Many people spend their holiday seasons inside shopping malls. More and more, kids, in particular, are passing up the opportunity to play outdoors during the rest of the year too. The trend could be contributing to serious health risks such as obesity. And so a movement of parents, teachers and lawmakers is trying to get young people back into nature.

You may listen to the “Nature Deficit” radio report online, as well as find additional links and resources. Also see Photos from the kids’ “Camping at the Presidio” trip on

Gabriela Quirós is a Segment Producer for KQED-TV, and is the producer for this radio report.

latitude: 37.797, longitude: -121.638157

  • jane gert

    Ethenal and biofuels are killing beuatiful people and the rest of the beuatiful life of Earth and killing the wealth of the earth which can save all of the beuatiful people and all of the rest of the beuatiful life of earth.


Gabriela Quirós

Gabriela Quirós is a TV Producer for KQED Science. She started her journalism career in 1993 as a newspaper reporter in Costa Rica, where she grew up. She won two national reporting awards there for series on C-sections and organic agriculture, and developed a life-long interest in health reporting. She moved to the Bay Area in 1996 to study documentary filmmaking at the University of California-Berkeley, where she received master’s degrees in journalism and Latin American studies. She joined KQED as a TV producer when QUEST started in 2006 and has covered everything from Alzheimer’s to bee die-offs to dark energy. She has shared two regional Emmy Awards, and nine of her stories have been nominated for the award as well. Independent from her work on QUEST, she produced and directed the hour-long documentary Beautiful Sin, about the surprising story of how Costa Rica became the only country in the world to outlaw in-vitro fertilization. The film is airing nationally on public television stations in 2015.

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