A recent Gallup Poll found that 14 percent of Californians plan on moving to a new state within the next 12 months. And 34 percent of residents would like to move if given the opportunity.

That puts California well above the nationwide average (6 percent) of people who will probably relocate and slightly above the U.S. average (34 percent) for those who would like to pack up and go. Although the state is not in the top 10 in either category, it’s also not an oasis of complacency and contentment.

Are you wanting to leave? If not, what makes you stay?

KQED is partnering with public media stations around the country to explore what keeps people in place or  what motivates them to move. Do you love California’s natural beauty? Or are you tired of paying so much for housing? No matter what your story is, we want to hear it on Instagram or Twitter.

How You Can Participate:

  • Snap a photo that illustrates why you stay or what is driving you to move.
  • Use the hashtag #WhyIStay when you post it to Instagram or Twitter.
  • Tell us your story in a few sentences.
  • Include which Bay Area city you’re living in.
  • Tag us: @kqednews. We may regram your pic! (Tip: While you’re at it, be sure to follow our main account, @KQEDofficial )

We’ll compile some of our favorites and share them on May 23.

Be sure to check out our partners in this project on Instagram:

WFAE (Charlotte, N.C.) - @wfaepublicradio Boise State Public Radio - @boisestatepublicradio WBUR (Boston, Mass.) – @wbur WESA (Pittsburgh, Pa.) – @905wesa St. Louis Public Radio – @stlpublicradio Michigan Radio – @michiganradio KUOW (Puget Sound Region, Wash.) – @kuow WNYC (New York, N.Y.) – @wnyc WVEP (West Virginia) – @wvpublicnews WLRN (Miami, Fl.) – @wlrn KTOO (Juneau, Alaska) – @ktoopubmedia  

  • julieg

    I already moved. Couldn’t afford the cost of housing in SF or anywhere else that I liked in the Bay Area. I moved to Pittsburgh, PA last year and was able to afford the home of my dreams for the cost of a down payment in SF. Pittsburgh is not unlike SF and home prices are about 75% lower.

    • OhSay CanuSee

      Pittsburgh has this silly little thing called “weather” so expect to pay an extra 2-3k a year for heating and cooling. That’s an extra 90k over a 30 year period.

      But if you don’t mind being indoors most of the time than Pittsburgh is for you.

      P.S. Olivia, most real Californians are not going to tweet or hashtag stuff to your poll, just kids and tech transplants maybe. You’re a carpet bagger yourself and probably think all Californians are wired to the hilt and have nothing better to do than play social media.

  • Michelle Hanson

    I’m a 4th generation Californian. I hope to move to Nashville, TN, soon from my current home in Willow Glen (San Jose). I made a list of pros and cons. Pros – CA has nice weather. Cons – CA has high taxes, Unions dictate public policy, state is gerrymandered, Jerry Brown’s third term, Jerry Brown’s train to no-where, Central Valley Dust Bowl created by public policy, poor fiscal policies, political correctness instead of common sense, Liberals who talk about tolerance and understanding, but are intolerant of differing opinions. Pros – TN has incredibly nice people, who are honest and helpful, no state tax, great schools like Vanderbilt, same great stores as CA like Costco, Home Depot, etc., hip, trendy restaurants, culture and music without the trash, beautiful homes for 1/3 of the price of CA, lower property taxes (by percentage). Cons – TN does not have the great weather of CA, but they have more interesting weather. I can’t wait to light a wood fire in fireplace without the worry of my ‘neighbor’ ratting me out. Farewell comrades -

Author

Olivia Allen-Price

Olivia Allen-Price is an interactive and engagement producer at KQED News. She has previously worked at The Baltimore Sun and The Virginian-Pilot. Talk to her about running, curly hair and playing the ukulele. Reach her @oallenprice or by email at ohubertallen@kqed.org.

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor