Good Read: Google Is Having Trouble Trying to Trademark the Word ‘Glass’

googleglass

The Wall Street Journal reports the U.S. Trademark Office is balking at Google’s attempt to trademark the latest noun affixed to its corporate moniker.

Google, which has successfully trademarked the term “Google Glass,”  submitted an application last year for a trademark on just the single word “Glass,” displayed with the same futuristic font used in its marketing campaign. But the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is holding up the company’s bid.

In a letter to the company last fall, a trademark examiner raised two main objections. One concern was that the trademark was too similar to other existing or pending computer software trademarks that contain the word “glass,” creating a risk of consumer confusion.

Here’s the best part, if you’re thinking of entering a career as a patent and trademark civil servant:

Trademark attorneys for Google, Anne Peck and Katie Krajeck from Cooley LLP, wrote back to the trademark office examiner two weeks ago with a 1,928-page letter in defense of the application. (About 1,900 pages of the letter are just clips of articles about Google Glass.)

Franny, Zooey and Seymour Glass were unavailable for comment.

Read the full WSJ article here.

Author

Jon Brooks

Jon Brooks writes mostly on film for KQED Arts. He is also an online editor and writer for KQED's daily news blog, News Fix. Jon is a playwright whose work has been produced in San Francisco, New York, Italy, and around the U.S.

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