(John Moore/Getty Images)
(John Moore/Getty Images)

Update, Feb. 19:

A Petaluma company’s recall of nearly 9 million pounds of beef is now affecting more than 1,000 establishments in 29 states and Canada, according to The Press Democrat. Nestle is voluntarily recalling some of its Hot Pockets because they might contain affected meat from Rancho Feeding Corp. The Press Democrat has published a list of products subject to the beef recall.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has deemed products made from meat processed at Rancho Feeding Corp. in 2013 unfit for consumption because it processed diseased animals without a full federal inspection. So far, no illnesses have been reported. But the closure of the North Bay region’s only slaughterhouse is having a profound effect on ranchers.

KQED’s Mina Kim talked on Wednesday with Stephanie Larson, director of the University of California Cooperative Extension for Sonoma County and livestock range management adviser:

Original Post, Feb. 9 from The Associated Press:

A Petaluma company is recalling more than 8.7 million pounds of beef products because it processed diseased and unhealthy animals without a full federal inspection, federal officials said Saturday.

That’s just over a year’s worth of meat products processed by Rancho Feeding Corp., which has been under scrutiny by the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service. The agency said that without full inspection, the recalled products are unfit for human consumption. It also said no illness associated with the products has been reported so far.

The products were processed from Jan. 1, 2013, through Jan. 7, 2014, and shipped to distribution centers and retail stores in California, Florida, Illinois and Texas. The food inspection service said in an announcement Saturday the following Rancho Feeding products are subject to recall:

  • “Beef Carcasses” (wholesale and custom sales only)
  • 2 per box “Beef (Market) Heads” (retail only)
  • 4-gallons per box “Beef Blood” (wholesale only)
  • 20-lb. boxes of “Beef Oxtail”
  • 30-lb. boxes of “Beef Cheeks”
  • 30-lb. boxes of ” Beef Lips”
  • 30-lb. boxes of “Beef Omasum”
  • 30-lb. boxes of “Beef Tripas”
  • 30-lb. boxes of “Mountain Oysters”
  • 30-lb. boxes of “Sweet Breads”
  • 30- and 60-lb. boxes of “Beef Liver”
  • 30- and 60-lb. boxes of “Beef Tripe”
  • 30- and 60-lb. boxes of “Beef Tongue”
  • 30- and 60-lb. boxes of “Veal Cuts”
  • 40-lb. boxes of “Veal Bones”
  • 50-lb. boxes of “Beef Feet”
  • 50-lb. boxes of “Beef Hearts”
  • 60-lb. boxes of “Veal Trim”

Last month the company recalled more than 40,000 pounds of meat products produced on Jan. 8 that also didn’t undergo a full inspection.

The problems were discovered as part of an ongoing investigation, the FSIS said.

A call to the company went unanswered.

There have been no reports of illnesses. A Food Safety and Inspection Service spokesman said because some of the products could still be frozen and in storage, a Class I recall was issued because the meat product could cause serious, adverse health consequences.

  • Naneki

    I think this company should be out of business. It is pathetic to think that they care so little for the consumer that they would do this to us. I am beginning to wonder, I purchased some beef and sausage to make a meatloaf yesterday and today we are both suffering from stomach illness. However, it says they didn’t ship it directly to the state of Washington? Still wondering……

  • Jeff

    There is more to this story..much more. Pretty strange that the only local meat processor is dealing with this.

    http://www.biteclubeats.com/rancho-recall-the-end-of-sonoma-county-beef/

  • Natalee

    Please please please reach out to the small farmers in Petaluma and get their side of the story. This recall happened because of paperwork, not because of diseased meat. There have been no illnesses. The first inspection is often where they catch sick animals, the second and third inspection is to ensure that the meat had been handled properly (i.e. not dropped on the ground and passed along).

    The statement that “A Petaluma company is recalling more than 8.7 million pounds of beef products because it processed diseased and unhealthy animals without a full federal inspection” is incredibly misleading and unfounded because there is absolutely no evidence released that any of the animals were sick or diseased. The “full federal inspection” part refers to the changed regulations that had not yet been put in place at this processing facility. I have a lot of respect for the reporting at KQED and I am very disappointed that there has not be more digging into this matter. This facility is the last local meat processor in the area, if it gets shut down all our meat will have to be shipped in from bigger ranches where there are most definitely diseased animals and the small, organic, grass-fed meat farmers will struggle if not unjustly lose their businesses all together if the media perpetuates this story without the proper investigation.

  • Natalee

    Please please please reach out to the small farmers in Petaluma and get their side of the story. This recall happened because of paperwork, not because of diseased meat. There have been no illnesses. The first inspection is often where they catch sick animals, the second and third inspection is to ensure that the meat had been handled properly (i.e. not dropped on the ground and passed along).

    The statement that “A Petaluma company is recalling more than 8.7 million pounds of beef products because it processed diseased and unhealthy animals without a full federal inspection” is incredibly misleading and unfounded because there is absolutely no evidence released that any of the animals were sick or diseased. The “full federal inspection” part refers to the changed regulations that had not yet been put in place at this processing facility. I have a lot of respect for the reporting at KQED and I am very disappointed that there has not be more digging into this matter. This facility is the last local meat processor in the area, if it gets shut down all our meat will have to be shipped in from bigger ranches where there are most definitely diseased animals and the small, organic, grass-fed meat farmers will struggle if not unjustly lose their businesses all together if the media perpetuates this story without the proper investigation.

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