Lake Oroville, the largest reservoir in the State Water Project, is pictured on Jan. 18, 2014, the day it hit its lowest point (so far) during the current drought. (Dan Brekke/KQED)
Lake Oroville, the largest reservoir in the State Water Project, is pictured on Jan. 18, 2014, the day it hit its lowest point (so far) during the current drought. (Dan Brekke/KQED)

As a California native, I am drawn to art that captures the landscapes and people I grew up amidst. It’s why I am drawn to Wallace Stegner and Joan Didion, why I never tire of Ansel Adams and trying futilely to recreate, in my own photography and prose, the lines of rolling hills, the silhouettes of aging oaks, the saltiness of the coast and my family.

I am not alone.

At KQED, we know our community is teeming with talent. So we’re asking all of you creative types to help us capture this historic moment in weather — the drought.

We’re specifically asking for haiku, given the form’s connection to nature. But if you’re more of a sonnet person, by all means, send us those, too. In fact, we’re interested in any art that’s being inspired by California’s lack of rain.

All of this genius is living on The State of Drought, our drought blog. To share your work simply visit and click on the submit tab. We look forward to reading yours.

Here is a sampling of the haiku we’ve already received:

Drought Haiku

turning up the heat we have upset Mother Earth sold my umbrella

– Submitted by vince alcouloumre

drought haiku #2

winter drought even sparrows tire of blue skies

– submitted by haikuandy

Drought Haiku

Showers should be short My son cannot remember Child of ample rain

– submitted by Edith Friedman

 Untitled

rain and rain and rain

Fresno facebook rejoices

I can breathe again

– submitted by fresnopolitics

 

  • janet butler

    beautiful photo, gorgeous muted colors, lovely composition – congrats!!!

    • Dan Brekke

      Thanks, Janet.

Author

Amanda Stupi

Amanda Stupi is an interactive producer for KQED News. She grew up in Northern California, where her mother would woo her inside on warm summer nights with promises of The Monkees and CHIPS. Stupi is fascinated with the intersection between popular culture and the fine arts. Her idea of artistic perfection includes The Beastie Boys' Check Your Head, Joni Mitchell's Blue, Bull Durham, several episodes of Cheers, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice and most of Wallace Stevens' poetry. Stupi's life goals include watching every episode of Law and Order, finishing a screenplay and thanking her mom in an Oscar acceptance speech.

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor