A protester at a fast-food wage protest in Oakland in early December. They are asking for $15 and the right to form a union. (Sara Hossaini/KQED)
A protester at a fast-food wage protest in Oakland in early December. They are asking for $15 and the right to form a union. (Sara Hossaini/KQED)

Our time at the top of the bottom is coming to an end — at least for now.

The Washington D.C. Council voted last night to raise its minimum wage to $11.60, effective in 2016.

That tops San Francisco’s minimum wage of $10.74 an hour, which goes into effect on Jan. 1, and makes D.C.’s the highest planned minimum wage in the country.

But Washington’s distinction may not be long-lived.

That’s because Mayor Ed Lee announced earlier this month that he’s planning a ballot measure for next year that would raise the city’s minimum wage¬† to as much as $15.

That’s in line with what Bay Area fast food workers asked for during a recent protest.

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