An inmate at Chino State Prison sleeps on his bunk bed in a gymnasium that was modified to house prisoners on December 10, 2010 in Chino, California. (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
An inmate at Chino State Prison sleeps on his bunk bed in a gymnasium that was modified to house prisoners on December 10, 2010, in Chino, California. (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

A panel of federal judges has extended California’s deadline to cut its prison population until April 18.

The judges previously had moved the deadline to February, to allow a court-appointed mediator to work on a long-term solution with Gov. Jerry Brown’s administration and attorneys representing inmates.

According to the Associated Press, “the judges ordered that those talks continue until Jan. 10. But the one-paragraph order released Wednesday warns that they plan no further extension in the negotiations, ‘absent extraordinary circumstances.'”

“We are encouraged that the court has extended these deadlines and we will continue our efforts both with the court and with our partners in law enforcement and local government to build upon California’s landmark reforms to our criminal justice system,” said Deborah Hoffman, spokeswoman for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, in a statement.

The state must reduce the prison population to about 110,000 inmates by spring.

The Brown administration is pushing for a three-year delay in the court-ordered deadline to give rehabilitation programs time to work as an alternative to housing thousands of inmates in private prisons and county jails.

The entire statement from the order:

On September 24, 2013, this Court ordered the parties to participate in a meet-and confer process facilitated by the Honorable Peter Siggins. On October 21, 2013, the Court extended the meet-and-confer process to November 18, 2013. The Court now extends the meet-and-confer process to January 10, 2014. The Court does not anticipate any further extensions of the meet-and-confer process absent extraordinary circumstances. The deadline to achieve the ordered reduction in population is extended accordingly, to April 18, 2014,n again without prejudice to the parties’ requesting a further extension of this deadline or the Court so ordering.

Here is the Associated Press story by Don Thompson:

Sacramento — A panel of federal judges on Wednesday extended California’s deadline to cut its prison population until April 18, while ordering that negotiations continue over how best to reduce inmate crowding.

The judges previously moved the deadline to February while a court-appointed mediator works to find a long-term solution with Gov. Jerry Brown’s administration and attorneys representing inmates who say crowding leads to conditions so poor that they violate constitutional standards.

The judges ordered that those talks continue until Jan. 10. But their one-paragraph order warns that they plan no further extension in the negotiations “absent extraordinary circumstances.”

“The court is bending over backward to accommodate the state,” said Don Specter, director of the nonprofit Prison Law Office and one of the attorneys representing inmates in the case. “We’re anxious to either complete the negotiation process, or if that’s not successful, to resume litigation at the earliest possible time.”

With the extension, the state now faces a spring deadline to reduce the population of its major prisons to about 110,000 inmates. Despite recently announced plans to open several publicly and privately operated prisons, the state is still about 4,400 inmates over the population cap set by the courts.

The state has already reduced its prison population by about 25,000 inmates in the past two years, primarily through a law that sends lower-level offenders to county jails instead of state prisons.

Deborah Hoffman, speaking on behalf of the administration and the state corrections department, said officials are encouraged by the extension and will continue their efforts “to build upon California’s landmark reforms to our criminal justice system.”

The state has been pushing for a three-year delay in the court-ordered deadline to give rehabilitation programs time to work. A new state law lets the state spend $315 million this fiscal year to house thousands of inmates in private prisons and county jails unless the court postpones its deadline for reducing the prison population.

The judges have ruled that reducing crowding is the best way to improve care for sick and mentally ill inmates, and the U.S. Supreme Court has twice refused to intervene.

Specter said it is important that crowding be quickly reduced because what is now a 3-month delay in the court’s original year-end population reduction deadline is hurting inmates.

“Our clients need to have the court’s order enforced as soon as possible because overcrowding remains a serious problem,” he said.

  • http://www.facebook.com/LiberalsToRecallJerryBrown drBCayenneBird

    This extension is a big mistake. A prisoner has already died a preventable death at Sierra Conservation Center where 32 men are crammed into dormitories met for 16 people. Andrew Tisnado, a 31 year old father of two babies was found dead in his bed with a severe brain injury. There are two level 2 dormitories where there are no guards at night. The prisoners aren’t livestock. There is a death toll, almost daily due to these overcrowding problems. His crime? Two witnesses say that the corrupt East L.A. cops planted “ammo” on him. He shouldn’t have been in prison in the first place. We need a Governor who is going to re-try every case because the system is corrupt arrest through parole.

  • Gina

    Extension to have more inmates died preventable deaths is a Crime in it’s self, but most of the inmates end up doing life due to abuses, excessive force, instigated convictions on behalf of the C.O.s, corruption all across the state in the penal system. I do believe Christopher Dorner was telling the truth about corruption in law enforcement. Look what happen to Thomas Kelly caught on video, so why isn’t the public outraged?

  • Nina Courtney

    This is the perfect example of how the wheels of justice turn ever so slowly. If the current administration is asking for an extension to see if rehabilitation programs work, then why didn’t the administration put them into operation before they moved all the inmates? I think this administration wants re-alignment to fail, wants to keep jailing mentally ill and addicted people and wants to re enforce the already broken sentencing structure we have. I think they want to continue with the currant unsustainable system because it has politically worked for them.People of Calif.must find a leader that believes in restorative justice.

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