Election officials forecast low voter turnout for San Francisco's election. (David Paul Morris/Getty)
Election officials forecast low voter turnout for San Francisco’s election. (David Paul Morris/Getty)

Four years ago, just over 22 percent of people registered to vote actually showed up for the off-year, no-mayor’s-race election. Analysts are predicting this year could be even lower. The silver lining: If you do show up at the polls, your vote could count more than ever. 

Chances are good you’ve seen the “No Wall on the Waterfront” or “Open Up The Waterfront” signs around town. But what do those slogans really mean? And what else is on the ballot? Here’s a quick look.

PROP A – RETIREE HEALTH CARE How the ballot reads: Shall the City change its Charter to allow payments from the Retiree Health Care Trust Fund only when the Trust Fund is fully funded or only under specified circumstances?

In a nutshell: This measure prevents officials and lawmakers from raiding the city retiree health care fund for other projects – at least until it is fully funded.

Arguments For:

Arguments Against:

8 Washington Street is currently home to a private tennis and swimming club. (Google Earth)
8 Washington Street is currently home to a private tennis and swimming club. (Google Earth)

PROP B – 8 WASHINGTON DEVELOPMENT Debate about who and how San Francisco’s waterfront should be used are not new, as Scott Shafer reported for KQED Newsroom.  The latest debate centers on a multipurpose development planned for 8 Washington Street.

How the ballot reads: Shall the City allow a development project at the 8 Washington Street Site that would include new housing, retail and recreational facilities, and open space, and would increase the legal building height limits on a portion of the Site?

In a nutshell: Do you want a new development along the waterfront that, in some areas, would exceed the current height limits? Or do you want to keep what is currently there, a walled-in tennis club and parking lot – at least until another proposal is made.

Arguments For: 

Arguments Against:

 

A rendering of the proposed 8 Washington development. (Courtesy of 8 Washington)
A rendering of the proposed 8 Washington development. (Courtesy of 8 Washington)

PROP C – 8 WASHINGTON DEVELOPMENT HEIGHT 

How the ballot reads: Shall the City ordinance increasing legal building height limits on an approximately half-acre portion of the 8 Washington Street Site along Drumm Street take effect?

In a nutshell: The Board of Supervisors already voted to allow the development at 8 Washington Street to reach 136 feet tall, 52 feet above current height limits in the area. Do you want to see their decision take effect?

Arguments For: 

Arguments Against:

PROP D – PRESCRIPTION DRUGS COSTS Though this proposition lacks real teeth, it sets an agenda for political leaders.

How the ballot reads: Shall it be City policy to use all available opportunities to reduce the City’s cost of prescription drugs and to ask state and federal representatives to sponsor legislation to reduce drug prices paid by the government?

In a nutshell: Should the city seek out opportunities to reduce the cost of prescription drugs?

Arguments For:

Arguments Against:

Author

Olivia Allen-Price

Olivia Allen-Price is an interactive and engagement producer at KQED News. She has previously worked at The Baltimore Sun and The Virginian-Pilot. Talk to her about running, curly hair and playing the ukulele. Reach her @oallenprice or by email at ohubertallen@kqed.org.

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