Some of the central cast members: (L-R) Mike (Jonathan Banks), Saul Goodman (Bob Odenkirk), Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul), Walter White (Bryan Cranston), Marie Schrader (Betsy Brandt), Hank Schrader (Dean Norris), Skyler White (Anna Gunn) and Walter White, Jr. (RJ Mitte) (Frank Ockenfels/AMC)
Some of the central cast members: (L-R) Mike (Jonathan Banks), Saul Goodman (Bob Odenkirk), Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul), Walter White (Bryan Cranston), Marie Schrader (Betsy Brandt), Hank Schrader (Dean Norris), Skyler White (Anna Gunn) and Walter White Jr. (RJ Mitte) (Frank Ockenfels/AMC)

Here’s a public media secret: Sometimes between episodes of Charlie Rose, “NewsHour,” “Sesame Street” and “Masterpiece Theater,” we sneak a look at what else is happening on television. Things like baseball, football, “The Colbert Report” and Fox News. It has not escaped our notice that AMC’s “Breaking Bad” is wrapping up its run tonight. Along with much of the rest of the viewing audience, we have occasionally binge-watched the show to catch up so that we’d be in sync with America for tonight. (Or almost in sync. We’re aware the final episode is on the air.) As we get ready to fire up the DVR, here are some of the things we’ll miss as “Breaking Bad” completes its run: 1. The weekly refresher on the periodic table of the elements. You know — those highlighted letters during the credits? 2. Wondering whether methamphetamine could really bring down an airliner 3. Blue crystal meth doughnuts. 4. The hat. 5. Pondering Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle as it relates to the birth of antihero/meth chemist Walter White. 6. The New Mexico locations. 7. The Walt Whitman plot line. 8. The ugly cars. 9. All those characters: Badger, Skinny Pete, Combo, Gus, Hector, Gale, Hank, Marie, Skyler, Walter Jr., Jane, Andrea, Jesse and Mike. But especially Saul Goodman, the garishly dressed and in his own way endlessly optimistic lawyer, his office decorated in U.S. Constitution wallpaper, who never let his clients or the audience down. Better call Saul. 10.You say you prefer spending your Sunday nights with “Downton Abbey”? This one’s for you:

Author

Dan Brekke

Dan Brekke (Twitter: @danbrekke) has worked in media ever since Nixon's first term, when newspapers were still using hot type. He had moved on to online news by the time Bill Clinton met Monica Lewinsky. He's been at KQED since 2007, is an enthusiastic practitioner of radio and online journalism and will talk to you about absolutely anything. Reach Dan Brekke at dbrekke@kqed.org.

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