News Pix: BART Rally, Taxi Drivers Protest Ride-Share Apps and Berkeley P.O. Controversy

Bart Rally2 About 400 BART workers and union supporters gathered in Oakland at Frank Ogawa Plaza to rally in support of BART workers standing up for better wages, even if it means another BART strike. Then they peacefully marched to BART headquarters. (Deborah Svoboda / KQED)

 

Danny Glover Danny Glover was one of the speakers at a rally in support of BART workers in downtown Oakland Thursday, Aug. 1. “If we concede, that we will continue to concede. … We have to stand up now,” Glover said. (Deborah Svoboda / KQED)

 

taxi protest A protester mocks app-based ride company Lyft and its signature pink mustaches at a cab driver rally outside San Francisco City Hall on Tuesday, July 30. Many taxi drivers feel the ride apps are unfair competition and a threat to their business. (Alex Emslie / KQED)

Ridesharing CPUC decision The California Public Utilities Commission issued a draft decision to allow ride-for-pay apps like Lyft, Uber and Sidecar to operate legally in the state on Tuesday, July 30. If approved by the full commission in early September, the companies would have to comply with more safety rules and provide vehicles capable of caring for disabled passengers. (Deborah Svoboda / KQED)

 

PhotoWeek130802postoffice A group of about 15 people are camping outside the downtown Berkeley Post Office at 2000 Allston Way to protest the federal government’s plans to sell the historic Renaissance-style building. The encampment followed a 100-strong rally on Saturday July 27. (Ted Friedman / Berkeleyside)

 

PhotoWeek130802JesseTuesday

Jesse Tuesday, owner of Tuesday Tattoo on San Francisco’s Judah Street, pauses while tattooing a customer. Tuesday is one of the small business owners helping to make the last blocks of Judah Street before the ocean a thriving hub. (Daniel McElmury / Ocean Beach Bulletin)

Oakland recyclers About 100 recycling workers march in front of Oakland City Hall on Tuesday, July 30, demanding better pay and working conditions.  A Waste Management spokesman said if cities want recycling workers to get more money, then they’ll have to increase what they pay for the services. (Andrew Stelzer / KQED)

 

PhotoWeek130802WillardBilts After 18 years in prison, Willard Birts just came home. He was released through Prop. 36 resentencing laws that reformed California’s three strikes law in November 2012. In this photo, he is watching a video of his daughter, now 27, who will be able to have him physically in her life for the first time since she was 9 years old. (Raj Jayadev / San Jose Beez)

Author

Katrina Schwartz

Katrina Schwartz is a journalist based in San Francisco. She's worked at KPCC public radio in LA and has reported on air and online for KQED since 2010. She's a staff writer for KQED's education blog MindShift.

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