Napolitano Confirmed as UC President; Undocumented Students Disrupt Proceedings

Protesters speak out against Janet Napolitano as the next choice for the UC president at the UC Regents meeting at UCSF's Mission Bay campus. (Isabel Angell/KQED)
Protesters speak out against Janet Napolitano as the next choice for the UC president at the UC Regents meeting at UCSF’s Mission Bay campus. (Isabel Angell/KQED)

Janet Napolitano has been confirmed as the next president of the University of California. The confirmation proceedings were marked by student protests inside and outside the UC Board of Regents meeting in San Francisco.

During public comment, one student was arrested inside the conference room after he charged the board dais. Four other students were arrested for unlawful assembly after refusing to stop chanting. The students come from undocumented immigrant families, and shared stories of their families being torn apart by the immigration policies that Napolitano has enforced as head of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

The UC Board of Regents meeting was temporarily suspended, the students were cleared, the board reconvened, and then approved Napolitano’s appointment.

Napolitano then made her appearance to accept her new job. She said “one of the most important thing she brings to California is her ears,” so she can listen to the concerns and needs of faculty and students.

A student jumps the rope barricade and yells at the Regents, holding a sign. He was then arrested and led away. The students said that they did not feel the Regents were listening to their concerns over Janet Napolitano becoming the head of the UC system and particularly the effects it might have on undocumented students. Photo by Deborah Svoboda/KQED
A student jumps the rope barricade and yells at the Regents, holding a sign. He was then arrested and led away. The students said that they did not feel the Regents were listening to their concerns over Janet Napolitano becoming the head of the UC system and particularly the effects it might have on undocumented students. Photo by Deborah Svoboda/KQED
  • Kurt thialfad

    “Four other students were arrested for unlawful assembly after refusing to stop chanting. The students come from undocumented immigrant families…”.

    Hmmm, I wonder if these crimes and arrests make them eligible for deportation?

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