1 Part-Time Investigator in Oakland For 10,000 Burglaries and Other Findings From Bratton Report

Anthony Toribio, acting Oakland Police Chief talks at a press conference to release the Oakland Crime Reduction Project Bratton Group Findings and Recommendations. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)
Anthony Toribio, acting Oakland police chief, talks at a press conference to release the Oakland Crime Reduction Project Bratton Group Findings and Recommendations. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)

summary of the Bratton Report released today (the full report is due tomorrow) contains numerous basic criticisms of the Oakland Police Department.

One particular finding that stood out to us:

“Effectively, burglaries are not investigated in the City of Oakland with only one part-time investigator assigned to more than 10,000 burglaries last year.”

Other findings from the report:

  • OPD did not use data effectively.
  • The captains and other field managers at CompStat were not being held accountable for knowledge of crime in a designated district.
  • Captains, investigative commanders and special unit commanders should all be expected to come to CompStat meetings with a thorough familiarity with the crime patterns and crime conditions in their areas of responsibility, which is achieved by reading the incident reports about individual crimes.
  • Under the existing process there was no sense of coordination, information sharing or support from the centralized Criminal Investigation Division (CID). (Note: In January the chief of staff recognized in an interview with KQED that they are using unreliable data, and often could not accurately report crime numbers.)
  • Effectively, burglaries are not investigated in the City of Oakland with only one part-time investigator assigned to more than 10,000 burglaries last year.
  • Crime-scene technicians in Oakland work without direct supervision and therefore with little systematic organization.
  • The OPD’s digital photo file access, which could be a key tool in identifying robbery suspects, is extremely slow and is rarely used in current robbery investigations. Fingerprint evidence gathered at burglary scenes is not generally used in burglary investigations or submitted for comparisons by the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS).
  • blinkwonat2

    10,000 robberies or 10,000 burglaries? Or Both? You people do realize that the crimes are different. Robbery is the theft of property from a person’s control by force or fear. Burglary is entering into a premises with intent to commit theft. One is violent. The other non-violent. I sincerely hope you will clarify this. A “robbery” is a much more serious crime than a “burglary.” Anyone with a modicum of crime reporting experience would know the significant difference between the two terms.

    • Jon Brooks

      thanks for the correction

    • Sf2oak

      Are you saying that burglary is not a serious crime? Because if you are I disagree. When your home is burglarized you feel that your previously thought safe space has been violated. It is known that burglars return because you will have bought new stuff. You never know what a burglar might do if you catch them. The thought of somebody else in your space is very creepy.

      I agree that robbery is more serious but do not want to downplay the seriousness of burglary either.

  • armorbear

    Thank you for an extra good writing. What are the local people can get in such a perfect way to write the details? I have a presentation next week, and I look around this information and facts.

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