A.M. Splash: Oakland Mayor Rejects State of Emergency; Facebook Plans Big Announcement; Campos Wants Airport Named for Harvey Milk

  • Oakland not ready to declare state of emergency over crime wave (Oakland Tribune)
    City leaders rejected calls Monday to declare a state of emergency over a surge in violent crime they say is being driven by two warring criminal gangs. The gangs, which authorities refused to name, are responsible for about 90 percent of Oakland’s shootings, robberies and murders since summer, including four of this year’s six homicides, police Chief Howard Jordan said.

  • What’s Facebook’s secret? Company tells all today (SF Chronicle)
    Facebook’s mystery “press event” on Tuesday could reveal a more robust search feature that would intensify the competition between the social networking giant and its rival Google Inc. Facebook is holding the event at 10 a.m. (1 p.m. EST) at its Menlo Park, Calif., headquarters. The company has not said what it plans to announce. Last week, it invited bloggers and journalists to “come see what we’re building.” The company probably won’t be showing off a new office building —unless it decided to make its invitation very literal.

  • Campos wants Harvey Milk’s name on SFO (SF Chronicle)
    A San Francisco supervisor wants to rename the city’s airport in honor of civil rights leader Harvey Milk, a change supporters said would send a global message about the importance and struggles of gays and lesbians for equality. Supervisor David Campos will introduce legislation Tuesday that would place the proposal to rename San Francisco International Airport as Harvey Milk San Francisco International Airport before voters in November. To send the name change to voters, Campos needs the support of five other supervisors, and Monday he already had four co-sponsors.

  • Pilot in oil tanker accident switched course near Bay Bridge, during particularly difficult currents (SJ Mercury News)
    Shortly before a 752-foot oil tanker collided in the fog with the Bay Bridge last week, the pilot of the huge ship changed course in a risky maneuver that placed the vessel into a difficult turn even as strong currents swirled around the bridge towers. The new information, revealed Monday in interviews with the Bay Area News Group, points to pilot error, although thickening fog, a faulty beacon and dangerous currents also appear to have contributed to the accident that raised fresh questions about oil tanker safety in the bay.

  • PG&E trial unlikely for lawsuits brought by San Bruno blast victims, attorneys say (Bay Area News Group)
    In the wake of a major court ruling against PG&E, it now appears unlikely any of the survivors’ lawsuits stemming from the deadly 2010 San Bruno explosion will go to trial. During a Monday hearing in San Mateo County Superior Court, attorneys involved in the suits said they’ll come up with a process that could take about 90 days to settle the remaining legal claims lodged by more than 320 residents. Mediation efforts so far have netted settlements for some 120 other plaintiffs.

  • Muni delays’ economic impact sought (SF Chronicle)
    Supervisor Scott Wiener hasn’t had the best luck lately convincing his board colleagues that Muni is in desperate, desperate need of more money to make its service more reliable, so on Tuesday he plans to take a new tack: link any disruption in transit service with cold, hard cash. Wiener plans on asking for a hearing where Muni would report on all recent service problems, including the transit agency’s infamous Metro meltdowns – and the city controller would detail how much money those meltdowns cost in lost productivity.

  • Iconic journalist Belva Davis to be honored Feb. 23 (Contra Costa Times)
    Iconic California journalist Belva Davis will be honored by the Yerba Buena Arts Center in San Francisco on Feb. 23. The first black female television reporter in the West in 1964, Davis was the anchor for 19 years of KQED’s “This Week in Northern California.”

  • CalPERS’ investments bounce back (Sacramento Bee)
    Boosted by stocks and real estate, CalPERS’ investments bounced back strongly last year. The big pension fund said Monday it earned a 13.3 percent profit on its portfolio in calendar 2012. That’s significantly higher than the California Public Employees’ Retirement System’s official investment forecast of 7.5 percent.

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