Strikers blocked traffic at the Port of Oakland Tuesday morning, but did not disrupt operations at Oakland International Airport, officials said.

“In the maritime area, we are seeing disruptions and impacts on truckers and longshore workers trying to get to their jobs, but it is still a very fluid situation,” the Port of Oakland said in a statement. The Port of Oakland operates the airport as well as the seaport.

The Oakland Tribune reported that picket lines by the Service Employees International Union “brought traffic to a halt” at the gates of the seaport. It appeared that both longshoremen and teamsters were honoring the picket line.

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“In the maritime area, we are seeing disruptions and impacts on truckers and longshore workers trying to get to their jobs, but it is still a very fluid situation,” the Port of Oakland said in a statement. The Port of Oakland operates the airport as well as the seaport.

The Oakland Tribune reported that picket lines by the Service Employees International Union “brought traffic to a halt” at the gates of the seaport. It appeared that both longshoremen and teamsters were honoring the picket line.

The Port, facing a deficit, is asking SEIU workers to make a 5 percent contribution to their retirement funds. The workers began their strike at 9:30 p.m. Monday night and plan to continue until 7 p.m. on Tuesday.

“Local 1021 members have fought back against unfair labor attacks from port executives, who have illegally withheld vital information related to bargaining and have unilaterally changed the terms of our contract,” the SEIU said in a statement. “Executives refuse to bargain, dragging on negotiations with Port Workers for the last 16 months.”

Here’s the port’s version of the events:

The Port negotiated in good faith and reached a tentative agreement with SEIU 1021 for a new contract in March 2012, which had the following elements: preserved jobs, and no furloughs; preserved above average salaries vs. comparable agencies and classifications; employees would begin making a 5% contribution to their own retirement, as the Port currently pays the 8% employee share as well as the employer share of retirement costs. That agreement was rejected by the membership.

Within two weeks, a mutually-agreed-upon arbitrator is scheduled to begin the non-binding fact-finding phase of impasse proceedings between the Port and SEIU because Local 1021 members rejected the Tentative Agreement reached at the bargaining table in March. The meetings with the arbitrator are scheduled for Nov. 29, 30 and Dec. 3.

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