It’s not often that the U.S. government goes all out to entertain its citizens, but that’s more or less what happened over the weekend when the U.S. Navy’s Blue Angels zoomed over the Golden Gate as part of Fleet Week.

The squadron doesn’t go into combat — individual pilots might when on other assignments — and the Navy considers the show part of its recruitment efforts.

Many Californians love the aerial display, judging from tweets like this one by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom:

On the other hand, so many people hate the booming and roaring of the jets that the outgoing message of the information line for the event starts by inviting people to leave noise complaints.

So in this era of budget cutting, it seemed a fair question to ask how much tax payers laid out for the spectacle. “I have no idea,” said Mary Hickey, a public relations contractor hired to handle calls from the news media by the Airshow Network, a private company handling the crowds. The Navy’s press office didn’t return our calls.

The Blue Angels budget from the Finance Department.

The Finance Department, however, published this document showing that the Navy budgeted $39 million for the Blue Angels in 2012. Traveling around the country, the squadron planned to put on shows for 69 days in 2012.

Hickey said the Airshow Network estimates that about 1 million people watched the Blue Angels, not only at Marina Green but also standing on rooftops and everywhere else they could glimpse the sky.

Watching the Angels was free for anyone with a view of the sky. And the money collected for a seat on the viewing stand ($15 to $195) in Marina Green, along with concessions sales and sponsorship, went to pay for portable toilets, trash pickup, fencing and other logistics, Hickey said.

The Navy pays to buy the jets, fill them with fuel, train the pilots, etc. If a million people watch two-day shows that cost about a $1 million each, that works out to something in the neighborhood of $1 per audience member.

Worth it? Let us know your opinion.

  • Rosie

    Definitely worth it!

  • Alamo Lady

    Absolutely worth it. We don’t have a lot of things to be proud of these days, but the Blue Angels and the Endeavor shuttle reminded us of the number of intelligent, highly educated and hard-working people we have in the U.S., accomplishments that need to be seen by our youth.

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