A.M. Splash: Berkeley Declares Bisexual Pride; SF Occupy Strikes Tents; A’s Fans Defy Team Owners; Great Whites Spotted in Monterey Bay

  • Berkeley ready to proclaim Bisexual Pride Day (Oakland Tribunte)

    Berkeley may become the nation’s first city to officially proclaim Bisexual Pride Day. If approved by the City Council on Tuesday, Bisexual Pride Day would be celebrated on Sept. 23 when there are bisexual pride events in Los Angeles, Boston and other cities.

  • San Francisco Occupy protesters dismantle tents (Bay Area News Group)

    Protesters in San Francisco took down tents overnight to meet a 6 a.m. Tuesday deadline set by police, according to media sources. Police are keeping an eye on a small group in Justin Herman Plaza, according to KGO-TV. The protesters had marched Monday evening in the Financial District to mark the anniversary of the Occupy Wall Street movement. As many as 500 marchers blocked streets and rallied for an end to financial inequality.

  • Fight over Oakland trees, views not over (SF Chronicle)

    By the time Phyllis Bishop won the right to trim and clear her neighbors’ trees and regain the panoramic bay view from her Oakland hills home, 25 years had passed, her husband Lloyd had died, and she was living in a retirement home. Bishop, 95, sighed with relief at the victory of an epic legal and political battle with her neighbors that went all the way to the state Supreme Court. Yet, once the neighbors’ trees were cleared this year, Bishop noticed that city trees blocked the view from her property, violating a city ordinance.

  • Forgotten fans embrace surprising A’s (SF Chronicle)

    The spirit of the 2012 Oakland A’s has been captured in a Hollywood movie, but it’s not “Moneyball.” It’s “Major League,” the fictional account of a Cleveland Indians team owner who must lower attendance to activate a contractual clause that allows the team to move. And just as in the 1989 movie, in spite of A’s managing partner Lew Wolff – and the trading away of the team’s top players and the filling of the roster with unproven rookies and veterans considered past their prime – this team is dazzling its fans. That’s the tale of the 2012 Oakland A’s.

  • FBI: Monitoring Occupy was within rules (SF Chronicle)

    The FBI says its newly disclosed surveillance of the Occupy movement in Northern California stayed within federal rules and did not result in “unnecessary intrusions into the lives of law-abiding people.” The American Civil Liberties Union, which obtained FBI surveillance documents on the movement in a lawsuit under the Freedom of Information Act, wants to know why the agency is withholding nearly two-thirds of the records it says it has, and why it is citing national security as one reason for the nondisclosure.

  • Economic woes hit some Bay Area companies; others prosper (SJ Mercury News)

    With the lackluster economy hurting many corporations here and elsewhere, Wall Street is expecting the gloomiest round of third-quarter earnings from the nation’s biggest businesses since 2009. So far, analysts say, there is no evidence the Bay Area is falling off the same cliff. “I think it’s kind of hard to bet against technology companies in Silicon Valley,” said Roger Kay, an analyst with Endpoint Technologies Associates, noting that in the past, “they have defied gravity pretty well.”

  • Cassidy: Space shuttle Endeavour expected to take final flight over Silicon Valley (SJ Mercury News)

    If all goes as planned, the Bay Area will be treated to the stunning spectacle Friday of the space shuttle Endeavour riding across the region’s sky and dipping low toward the ground on the back of a 747 carrying a piece of American ingenuity into retirement.

  • Great white sharks spotted up and down the Monterey Bay (Oakland Tribune)

    Having spotted a humpback whale just off the Moss Landing harbor mouth, Sunday’s four-hour Blue Ocean Whale Watch Tour was off to a good start. That’s when it got incredible — co-owner Kate Cummings saw a great white shark, something she hadn’t seen in four years touring the Monterey Bay. The sighting left passengers aghast, and capped a long weekend of local shark sightings.

  • San Rafael woman may be lone heir of Nevada recluse who left $7 million in gold (Marin Independent Journal)

    A San Rafael woman might have hit the jackpot after a discovery made in Carson City, Nev. this summer. A Carson City recluse whose body was found in his home at least a month after he died left only $200 in his bank account. But as Walter Samaszko Jr.’s house was being cleared for sale, officials made a surprise discovery: gold bars and coins valued at $7 million.

  • Menlo Park man buys Pacific Sun weekly newspaper (Marin Independent Journal)

    After eight years as part of a Palo Alto-based company, the Marin weekly newspaper Pacific Sun will again be controlled by a sole proprietor. Menlo Park investor Bob Heinen has purchased the Pacific Sun for an undisclosed price from Palo Alto-based Embarcadero Media, which owns several other newspapers in cities such as Palo Alto, Mountain View and Pleasanton.

  • Limits Placed on Immigrants in Health Care Law (NY Times)

    The White House has ruled that young immigrants who will be allowed to stay in the United States as part of a new federal policy will not be eligible for health insurance coverage under President Obama’s health care overhaul. The decision — disclosed last month, to little notice — has infuriated many advocates for Hispanic Americans and immigrants. They say the restrictions are at odds with Mr. Obama’s recent praise of the young immigrants.

  • Former youth corrections officer runs restaurant staffed by at-risk kids (Bay Citizen)

    As a juvenile corrections officer who worked with gang-affiliated youth, Teresa Goines kept bumping up against the same problem: Many kids often committed crimes for the money. To discourage them from returning to drugs, gangs and violence after doing jail time, she needed to offer a legal alternative… In 2004, she hatched the idea to launch a restaurant entirely staffed by at-risk youth… With nearly no restaurant experience, Goines cashed in most of her retirement fund and opened the Old Skool Cafe in 2005.

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