A.M. Splash: Feds Raid Oaksterdam; Occupy SF Takes Building; FBI Intelligence Gathering Decried

Federal agents have converged on Oaksterdam University in downtown Oakland this morning, serving several warrants. Agents with Internal Revenue Service, U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency and U.S. Marshals are inside Oaksterdam University on Broadway, according to media sources.

Occupy SF activists put the mostly moribund movement back in the spotlight Sunday, taking over an unoccupied building owned by the Archdiocese of San Francisco with plans to establish a “permanent occupation” that would serve as shelter and a center for services for homeless people.

Newly disclosed intelligence-gathering on Bay Area Muslims by FBI agents who took part in “community outreach” programs is a dangerous practice that the Justice Department should look into, says Michael Yaki, a former San Francisco supervisor now on the U.S. Civil Rights Commission.

First lady Michelle Obama has appeared at a presidential campaign reception at San Francisco’s California Academy of Sciences. San Francisco Chronicle reporter Joe Garofoli, the pool reporter for Friday night’s event, says the first lady was introduced by California Attorney General Kamala Harris, an early supporter of President Obama in 2008.

When California’s high-speed rail leaders on Monday unveil their fourth and final business plan on the state’s controversial quest to link the Bay Area and Los Angeles by bullet train, they’ll be slashing $30 billion off the price tag and speeding up the first leg of construction beyond what’s been dubbed a train to nowhere in the Central Valley. They’ll also be delivering a message to Bay Area travelers looking forward to boarding a bullet train from here to Southern California: You’ll just have to wait.

Sobering photographs of her bruised forehead and neck, new text messages of a tempestuous affair and a police report of a volatile marriage all emerged this week, adding new layers of recklessness and despair to the public fall of Alameda County Supervisor Nadia Lockyer. In her first descriptions of the night that made her private troubles public, Lockyer told this newspaper this week through a series of emails that she was “violently assaulted” at a Newark hotel by her ex-lover, Stephen Chikhani, who sent text messages trying to woo her back.

The San Francisco Muni is turning 100 this year. And in that century of great technological progress, in which an aircraft broke the sound barrier in 1947 and a supersonic car did the same in 1997, Muni has actually become slower. In 1920, the F-Stockton streetcar carried passengers from the Financial District at Market and Stockton Streets all the way to the Marina at Chestnut and Scott Streets in a zippy 17 minutes. Today a very similar trip on the 30-Stockton, the successor to the F-Stockton, takes a half-hour if the stars are properly aligned.

After an extended delay, the Citizens Police Review Board will “tentatively” hold its Occupy Oakland public forum on May 16. The focus of the forum is expected to be the Oakland Police Department’s response to the Occupy Oakland encampments and protests between Oct. 25 and Jan. 28.

The San Francisco Ethics Commission will soon face its biggest test: recommending whether suspended Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi should be permanently removed from office for official misconduct.

Former Supervisor Denis Rice, who warned three decades ago that the pension program at Marin County Civic Center was “running in arrears” and has watched as county pension debt ballooned from $36 million to more than $700 million, said he wants to help “sharpen public debate” at a county pension forum Tuesday.

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