A.M. Splash: Oakland Running Festival Success; SF Man Arrested for 5 Killings; Feds’ Marijuana Crackdown

Among Sunday’s finishers in the third annual Oakland Running Festival were a man with a broken leg, a woman who gave birth six weeks ago, a homeless Iraq War veteran and an 11-year-old girl. All four completed either a full 26.2-mile marathon or a half-marathon, and they made a fitting sample of participants in a race that gave runners a full tour of Oakland’s diversity.

Police arrested a San Francisco man Sunday in the violent slayings of five people in a home in a quiet Ingleside neighborhood. Binh Thai Luc, 35, was arrested on suspicion of five counts of murder in connection with the killings discovered Friday at the home near City College of San Francisco, police said at a news conference Sunday evening.

For the school renowned as the Princeton of Pot and the Harvard of Hemp, the high times have wafted into a downer. Enrollment has plummeted at Oaksterdam University, the Oakland college that since 2007 has attracted 15,000 students to study cannabis cultivation and related careers, while boosting commerce in one of America’s most pot-friendly cities.

A 2012 deadline to start work on projects funded by state bonds means major fixes are coming soon to a bottleneck near you. Among the first jobs in a $5 billion building blitz will be extending carpool lanes on Interstate 880 between Milpitas and San Jose and from Oakland to San Leandro, followed next month by adding merging lanes along Highway 1 in Santa Cruz and on 101 from Mountain View to Palo Alto.

For two decades, Principal Paul Jacobsen was known as a no-nonsense, cut-to-the-chase, hard-nosed school administrator who didn’t hesitate to dole out strict punishment when students broke the rules. Then the San Francisco principal learned about something called the restorative justice approach.

Seeking to bring order and transparency to an area of the Internet that has become a Wild West of data collection, federal regulators Monday announced a sweeping set of new privacy standards designed to make it easier for consumers to see and understand what information is being collected about them.

The current pension system for Healdsburg city employees is not sustainable. That is spelled out plainly in the PowerPoint presentation that will be part of a City Council pension workshop on Monday, March 26.

Leading engineering advisers, who met in secret to assess the testing and safety of the new San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, maintain numerous financial and professional ties to the agency whose work they evaluate.

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