A.M. Splash: Anger Over Oakland School Closing Plan; Cops in BART Shooting Untrained for Crises; Rand Paul Blocks Pipeline Safety Bill; NRA vs. SF

  • Overflow crowd argues against district plan to close five Oakland schools (Oakland Tribune)

    Parents, teachers and children packed the auditorium of Oakland High School on Tuesday night to express their frustration, sadness and outrage about a school district plan to save $2 million by closing five elementary schools.

  • BART officers in shooting not trained for crises (SF Chronicle)

    Neither of the two BART police officers involved in the shooting of a transient at the Civic Center Station in July had received crisis intervention training, a specialized type of instruction that helps law enforcement interact with people who may be suffering from mental problems, the BART police chief said Tuesday.

  • Oakland Plans to stop use of liens for blight (SF Chronicle)

    Oakland plans to stop its controversial practice of placing prospective liens on properties that the city’s building inspectors deem as blighted, a decision that comes three months after a civil grand jury criticized the city for its code enforcement practices.

  • Tea Party conservative blocks pipeline safety bill (SF Chronicle)

    Tea Party conservative Sen. Rand Paul is blocking pipeline safety legislation intended to fix some of the problems that led to the rupture of a natural gas pipeline in San Bruno last year that destroyed a neighborhood and killed eight people.

  • Thousands of nurses return to work at Alta Bates (Oakland Tribune)

    Thousands of nurses returned to work Tuesday after a five-day labor dispute that turned deadly for one cancer patient. The cloud of Judith Ming’s death hung heavily over the returning staff at the Alta Bates Summit Medical Center in Oakland, where the 66-year-old died Saturday morning after a dietary supplement apparently was introduced into her intravenous line.

  • School officials say they’ll sue California over latest state budget (Sacramento Bee)

    Local school officials say they will sue California over $2.1 billion in education funding they believe state leaders should have provided in the June budget. Officials from the California School Boards Association, the Association of California School Administrators and school districts will hold a news conference today to explain their case.

  • NRA, San Francisco battle over gun-control laws (SF Examiner)

    San Francisco attempted to strengthen two local gun-control laws Tuesday to protect from legal challenges that could strike them from the books…The National Rifle Association has sued The City over these two laws in federal court as being unconstitutional.

  • Same-sex households up 80% in decade, census finds (SF Chronicle)

    Emboldened by advances in gay and lesbian legal protections and overall acceptance, the number of Americans reporting that they are living together as same-sex couples skyrocketed by 80 percent over the past decade, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

  • UC Alumni Reluctant to Donate (Bay Citizen)

    As the University of California’s regents look for new sources of money to make up for state budget cuts, they are finding that university alumni are not as willing to donate as they may have hoped.

  • Fallout widens from collapse of Fremont solar manufacturer Solyndra (SJ Mercury News)

    Fallout from the implosion of Fremont solar panel manufacturer Solyndra expanded Tuesday when California Treasurer Bill Lockyer called for a “pause” in the state clean-energy program that had provided Solyndra a $25.1 million tax break.

  • Watch out, Facebook; Google+ membership surges (SJ Mercury News)

    The Internet metrics company Experian Hitwise said traffic on Google+ surged 1,269 percent for the week after Google’s decision to open up membership to the 3-month-old site. On one day — Sept. 21 — Google+ was the third most popular social networking site, trailing only Facebook and YouTube, and surpassing Twitter.

Author

Jon Brooks

Jon Brooks writes mostly on film for KQED Arts. He is also an online editor and writer for KQED's daily news blog, News Fix. Jon is a playwright whose work has been produced in San Francisco, New York, Italy, and around the U.S.

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