SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) Gov. Jerry Brown will get his chance to let college students who entered the country illegally receive limited financial aid, under a bill approved by the state Senate.

Former Republican Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger repeatedly vetoed such legislation. But Brown, a Democrat, made a campaign pledge to sign bills allowing illegal immigrants to qualify for aid.

The Senate passed AB130 Thursday on a 26-11 vote.

The bill by Assemblyman Gil Cedillo, a Los Angeles Democrat, lets students who pay in-state tuition collect privately funded college scholarships.

A different Cedillo bill would make those students eligible for state-funded financial aid, but that measure is stalled in a committee.

Cedillo has introduced similar legislation each year since 2005.

Brown spokesman Gil Duran could not immediately say if the governor will sign the bill.

  • Brittanicus

    What the DREAM ACT lobbyists keep concealed?

    Its not the question of passing THE DREAM ACT that is the problem? Its the cause and effect afterwards of sponsorship of family members. It could accelerate hundreds of thousands of mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters to pour into our nation. Sponsors eventually don’t honor their commitment to financially support those they originally sponsored, so the burden falls upon the backs of taxpayers. Millions of old folk who came here under the surety of their sponsor, and are now being subsidized by SSI and Medicaid or Medicare–which they never, ever paid into. Eventually the DREAM ACT for students will cost Taxpayers billions of dollars, to cater with families. Learn more at NumbersUSA

  • NoDreamAct

    These Dream Act bills are an outrage, if you are a citizen. It’s the same old story; citizens will pay astronomical tuitions while illegal immigrants will not pay a penny. They have pushed themselves right to the front of the line.

    There is absolutely no doubt illegal immigrant students will get priority for financial aid and it will be next to impossible for citizens to go to college at any price. University of California, California State, and the California Community Colleges just keep increasing tuition for paying students, while giving illegal immigrants more and more tuition breaks

    Kids born here having illegal immigrant parents already get priority for college financial aid — while no one is paying attention. The FAFSA is the Federal Government’s form for financial aid. The instructions on the FAFSA to college kids with illegal immigrant parents is to fill out 000-00-000 for their social security numbers, and then report ALL income on their 1040 Tax return, which is none. If there is no social security number, there is no income on the 1040 Tax return.

    Obviously, all illegal immigrant students have illegal immigrant parents, so you guessed it, 100% will qualify for 100% of financial aid regardless of how much their parents earn on fraudulent social security numbers, cash jobs, or foreign income.

    It simply does not enable a state to work properly, when there is a huge illegal immigrant population that pays no net income tax (due to underreporting of income), who receives welfare (food stamps, Medi-Cal, and WIC) that they do not qualify for (because of underreporting income), and now full college tuition (because of underreporting income). What citizen could avoid jail time for repeatedly underreporting income to receive so many benefits? It is an outrage.

    Illegal immigrants using our own legislatures and courts take citizens to the cleaners. Citizens cannot continue to pay more, more, and more. Illegal immigrants are bottomless pits who want more than we have.

    • RidiculousBill

      I am a college student entering my last two years of school. I have already done four years, and throughout that four years, I have applied for over 800 unique scholarships, merit based and otherwise, and have reapplied as they become available every year. I graduated from high school with a 4.0, and from a community college with the same. To this date, I have no scholarships. I have nearly given up trying, and I am going to school on loans which will leave me in debt for many years.

      It is ridiculous that we are giving money to illegal immigrants when their are people like me out there.

      • Natasha

        “We are giving money to illegal immigrants” – Are you now? The bill did not allow for access to publicly-funded grants or scholarships or subsidized loans. The bill, AB130, allows undocumented students to apply for donor-funded scholarships, i.e. private. Do you get that? After 800 scholarship applications, you might have decided the opportunity cost was to too high not to just move on to a subsidized loan a tad bit earlier. (I know I had to get a loan 4 years to finish my BA; most of us do, unless we’re insanely wealthy.) At least pre economic crash and tuition hikes, the UCs frequently offered merit-based aid and scholarships. The decreased budgets available for our public CA universities is the fault of those that torpedoed the global economy into a crash. Madoff in the private sector and Geithner in the public is more at fault than any college student you think is skipping ahead of you in line. Maybe your next 2 years in college will give you a more global perspective about how public policy and lacking oversight on our banking industry intersects (and causes) the woes of low and middle income earners. Good luck with that! Civil society needs more critical thinkers.

    • Natasha

      “There is absolutely no doubt illegal immigrant students will get priority” – when will those rattled by their fears of what’s presumed to come look around at the world they live in today? Yes, I mean the present, as in a reality check. Beware! the undeserving will jump to the front of the line! It’s an alarming allegation. Students of color are still proportionally underrepresented in college – that’s unfair and unequal. Of this minority student population that’s in college, an even smaller percentage is undocumented (LAT reported only 600 students in the UC system). If you claim that preferential treatment is unfair, stop making projections, rein your fears in, and look at what is presently unfair and has been unfair for decades: being a taxpaying immigrant youth in the state of CA that has to work to go to college because there is no access to aide, from grants to scholarships to loans. Needless to say, the numbers speak for themselves: few undocumented youth make it college and less finish. If you’re working class, this hardship should resonate all the more. It does with me. Also, if you’re on payroll, you pay income taxes; if you don’t have an SSN, you can’t file a tax return. So as a population, undocumented immigrants don’t get tax credits (Earned Income Tax Credit), despite their low income bracket. So do the math: underreporting is not the issue, it’s not breaking the bank. As for welfare, even the most ignorant radio show host should know that the 1996 welfare reform bill disqualified undocumented immigrants from nearly all means-tested government programs including housing, Medicaid and Medicare-funded healthcare, and food stamps. The only public services available are K-12 education and emergency medical care. And it’s patently false that you can fill out FAFSA with 000-00-0000; that’s only possible with a public college app, but not for funding. You should try things out before blasting them; one’s identity is verified and a SSN is mandatory on FAFSA forms. You’re really letting your computer illiteracy and baseless resentment shine through. Maybe laying off the heavy dose of fear-mongering would would allow you to get your facts straight. Learn to determine what’s disinformation and become a critical thinker, please, I humbly ask, as a fellow citizen.

  • Arturo

    I’m glad to see these great bills supporting students being passed. It’s time that we realize that investments in students should be made no matter their status.

Author

Jon Brooks

Jon Brooks writes mostly on film for KQED Arts. He is also an online editor and writer for KQED's daily news blog, News Fix. Jon is a playwright whose work has been produced in San Francisco, New York, Italy, and around the U.S.

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