A fan wears a San Francisco Giants t-shirt.
A fan shows off his Giants pride during game three of the National League Championship Series. Photo: Amanda Stupi/KQED

Update 4 p.m.: A jury has been seated in the Barry Bonds steroids perjury trial. U.S. District Court Judge Susan Ilston congratulated the eight women and four men and told them to be in court at 8:30 tomorrow morning. Two alternates—both women—were also chosen.

The prosecution and defense agreed on the panel after asking about potential jurors’ attitudes toward Bonds, steroids, and local teams. No Giants fans were seated on the jury, but one of those chosen for the panel said she’s bought Oakland A’s fan gear in the past.

Earlier: More than three years after Barry Bonds was originally indicted for lying to a grand jury, the perjury trial of the former-Giants’ slugger got underway Monday with jury selection. Bonds is accused of lying in 2003 about knowingly taking performance-enhancing drugs. He has pleaded not guilty.

Reporter Lance Williams, who arguably owns the story of the BALCO steriod scandal, spoke to KQED about the upcoming trial and wrote an exhaustive article on the topic. If, like me, you’ve been doing your best to ignore the Bonds story the last few years, Williams will get you caught up.

You can listen to Scott Shafer’s interview with Williams below:

If you’re an orange and black wearing Giants fan who has been waiting for months to hear Renel Brooks-Moon announce the team as “Your World Champion San Francisco Giants,” the trial couldn’t come at a worse time.

The Giants home opener against Seattle is 18 days away. Bonds’ trail is expected to last two to four weeks. Though local baseball fans — strike that — Giants fans never seemed to share the hate for Bonds that the rest of the nation seems to have, fans, or at least this fan, hated that the rest of sporting world could not associate the Giants with anything or anyone other than Bonds. From what I can tell, most Giants fans are more concerned about Brian Wilson’s pulled oblique than whether or not Bonds will have to serve time. But the rest of the country might not be so blinded by the Giants’ World Series title. Perhaps last season’s focus on a team of misfits will once again shift to focussing on the biggest misfit of all. Let’s hope not.

Author

Amanda Stupi

Amanda Stupi is an interactive producer for KQED News. She grew up in Northern California, where her mother would woo her inside on warm summer nights with promises of The Monkees and CHIPS. Stupi is fascinated with the intersection between popular culture and the fine arts. Her idea of artistic perfection includes The Beastie Boys' Check Your Head, Joni Mitchell's Blue, Bull Durham, several episodes of Cheers, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice and most of Wallace Stevens' poetry. Stupi's life goals include watching every episode of Law and Order, finishing a screenplay and thanking her mom in an Oscar acceptance speech.

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