Photo Anita Hart

It wasn’t the staging of a nature-gone-amok sci-fi film over at Ocean Beach this weekend And — as far as we know — it wasn’t the first of a series of Biblical plagues being visited upon San Francisco.

It was just a whole lot of dead jellyfish — thousands of them — that washed ashore near Pacheco Street. From the Chronicle:

More than 10,000 of the gooey invertebrates, each about the size of a dinner plate, drifted onto the beach Friday evening. By Sunday, they had attracted hordes of the curious, the repulsed and the fascinated.

Kids stomped them. Dogs rolled in them. Surfers tossed them at each other. Some people tiptoed fearfully around them, while others pressed in with cameras for close-ups. Read full article.

A marine biologist at the Aquarium of the Bay at Pier 39 told the Chronicle that jellyfish have been washing ashore around the Bay for 500 million years or more.

Photos and videos at links below.

  • Thanks for the mention of the Ocean Beach Bulletin. We’ve got an update today as well, with input from a California Academy of Sciences researcher.

Author

Jon Brooks

Jon Brooks is the host and editor of KQED’s health and technology blog, Future of You. He is the former editor of KQED’s daily news blog, News Fix. A veteran blogger, he previously worked for Yahoo! in various news writing and editing roles. He was also the editor of EconomyBeat.org, which documented user-generated content about the financial crisis and recession. Jon is also a playwright whose work has been produced in San Francisco, New York, Italy, and around the U.S. He has written about film for his own blog and studied film at Boston University. He has an MFA in Creative Writing from Brooklyn College.

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