• California Watch delves into the history of the massive debt built up by the state under Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. California’s debt was one of the central issues in the 2003 recall election of then-Gov. Grey Davis. Whatever decisions, whether imprudent or unavoidable, were made, the post boils Schwarzenegger’s budgetary legacy down to this:

    (T)he elephant is still in the room. Seven years on, Schwarzenegger is in his final months as governor, facing basement-level approval ratings and the certainty of leaving office with California more deeply in debt and with outsize repayment costs for years to come.

  • SF Weekly’s The Snitch reports on a poll released yesterday that found that iPhone users are “two times more likely to be influenced by the Tea Party than those voters who carry an Android or Blackberry phone.” All I can say is that it must not have been a phone poll — I haven’t been able to get through to an iPhone user in months. Read the full poll results here.
  • On the Sacramento Bee’s Weed Wars blog, watch attorney general candidates Kamala Harris and Steve Cooley answer a question on whether they would defend in court Proposition 19, which legalizes marijuana. Harris basically sidesteps the question, saying she’ll call for an analysis by legal experts. Cooley is more definitive, stating he’s “inclined to advise that it is unconstitutional and pre-empted by federal law.” Which sound a lot like a “no” to me.
  • Streetsblog San Francisco reports that San Francisco has moved up to 4th and Oakland to 5th on the League of American Bicyclists’ list of top bicycle-commuting cities. The league takes census data and measures a population’s bike-riding to work relative to commuting by all modes of transportation. No. 1 on the list is Portland, Oregon. Here’s the complete list.

Author

Jon Brooks

Jon Brooks writes mostly on film for KQED Arts. He is also an online editor and writer for KQED's daily news blog, News Fix. Jon is a playwright whose work has been produced in San Francisco, New York, Italy, and around the U.S.

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