Calbuzz asks some good questions in this post called “How did the Armies of eMeg Blow the Nicky story?” Here’s the one I have been wondering myself:

Why didn’t Whitman and her husband, Dr. Griffith Harsh IV, do something for Nicky?

Why not spend $20,000 or so (or more, if need be) to hire her the best immigration attorney she could find to help her see what could be done to stay in the country or ease her return or whatever?

Why not offer her a year’s severance (about $18,000) or help her with re-settlement costs in Mexico? She was, in eMeg’s words, “a member of our extended family” (or as Meg said in one press conference, Freud never sleeping, “an extended member of our family”).

Okay, so Whitman and Harsh had to fire Diaz once they knew she was here illegally, if you buy their story. But they didn’t have to kick her to the curb. They might have avoided statements like this one from Nicky on Tuesday: “Meg, don’t say I was part of your family because you never treated me like I was.”

They could have tried to help her, which would have the advantage of being the right thing to do, would have made everyone feel better about themselves and – not insignificantly – would have demonstrated a measure of decency and compassion when the whole incident became public.

Yeah. Forget the moral/ethical question for a moment. Just on a political level, why not appease Diaz with a little financial help?

On the other hand, if Whitman had offered a big severance package, would everyone now be saying that, to keep her quiet, she had paid Diaz off?

Author

Jon Brooks

Jon Brooks writes mostly on film for KQED Arts. He is also an online editor and writer for KQED's daily news blog, News Fix. Jon is a playwright whose work has been produced in San Francisco, New York, Italy, and around the U.S.

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