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Technology in Schools

What’s Our Excuse?

Adding to the pile of reading for work and for pleasure, I’d like to add this video to watch: Sugata Mitra’s TED Talk presentation, as pointed out by Huffington Post, which begs the question: “In the world’s richest country – indeed, in all ‘Westernized’ societies – what are our (pitiful?) excuses, again, for not putting computers in the … Continue reading What’s Our Excuse? →

Tech or No Tech: A Great Teacher is Key

“Even within the United States, the best schools are not the most tricked-out ones,” writes Amanda Ripley in a Slate article called “Brilliance in a Box” posted yesterday. Here’s more: “In most of the highest-performing systems, technology is remarkably absent from classrooms,” says Andreas Schleicher, a veteran education analyst for the Organization for Economic Cooperation … Continue reading Tech or No Tech: A Great Teacher is Key →

Learning Better, One Kid at a Time

What if each student had her own teacher at school? Would she benefit from individual attention, progressing at her own pace, learning the way that best suited her? Clearly, it’s economically and physically impossible to provide each student a separate teacher, but technology can be a powerful tool in helping that process along. In today’s … Continue reading Learning Better, One Kid at a Time →

Telling Tales Together: 4 Great Collaborative Writing Tools

By Sara Bernard Storytelling is taking on all kinds of new forms in the Web 2.0 era. Now, thanks to a range of new software, students can not only flex their writing wings, but do it together,  by creating group-led e-books, fictional stories, blogs, op-eds, and petitions, and, in some cases, see their edits and … Continue reading Telling Tales Together: 4 Great Collaborative Writing Tools →

5 Ways to Link Up With Kids and Educators Across the Globe

By Sara Bernard The Internet is crammed with collaborative projects for kids, from music-making to drawing, mashups to Wikis, “pen” pal partnerships to citizen science. Some sites are designed specifically for students and teachers to connect across oceans; some just work well for that. The good news is that while some sites charge fees, most … Continue reading 5 Ways to Link Up With Kids and Educators Across the Globe →

Why It’s Time to Change the Role of Education

Veteran teacher, blogger, and educational technology expert Will Richardson was recently interviewed by Edweek. There are so many, but here are some of my favorite quotes: “I look at my kids’ tests all the time—it’s just factual stuff. You know, “What was the third ship that Columbus sailed?” I can’t stand it, because it doesn’t … Continue reading Why It’s Time to Change the Role of Education →

Digital Distraction or Helpful Classroom tool?

By U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Tracy DeMarco By Katie Stansberry I was in the middle of a lecture on blogging today when an all-too-familiar sound broke the flow of my presentation – the mechanical music of a ringing cell phone. To make the situation all the more annoying, the phone belonged to me. Despite … Continue reading Digital Distraction or Helpful Classroom tool? →

Using “Gee-Whiz” in Learning

A Q&A with Mike Looney, Vice President of Vertical Markets at Wolfram|Alpha. Q. For those who don’t know about the company, tell us about Wolfram Alpha and the products that are used in the education space. Wolfram|Alpha is a “computational knowledge engine” which we sometimes refer to as an “answer” or “fact” engine. You pose … Continue reading Using “Gee-Whiz” in Learning →

How Technology Can Help Push Past Test Scores

Flickr: peruisay Anthony Armstrong is an eighth-grade social studies teacher at Del Mar Middle School in Tiburon, Calif. I’ve asked him to check in regularly about all the ways in which he uses the benefits of technology in his classroom. By Anthony Armstrong For the past few years, I’ve been using Quia ($49.99/year) for online … Continue reading How Technology Can Help Push Past Test Scores →

What Should the Classroom of the Future Look Like?

Pushing for fundamental changes in education, panelists at the Silicon Valley Community Foundation regional meeting yesterday talked about what classrooms of the future should look like. The panelists: Anne Campbell, San Mateo County Schools Superintendent; Reed Hastings, CEO of Netflix; Salman Khan, founder of the Khan Academy; and Glenn Singleton, Executive Director of Pacific Educational … Continue reading What Should the Classroom of the Future Look Like? →

After the Media Moves on, What Next?

A week after the intense media spotlight of Education Nation, NBC’s foray into the education reform movement, conversations in the robust online community are going full force. Though there’s broad criticism of the event — of teacher-bashing, of political duals trumping important issues, of grandstanding and finger-pointing, of media’s fickle attention span — the topic … Continue reading After the Media Moves on, What Next? →

Wii in lieu of P.E.?

From the Fort Morgan Times: Fort Morgan School District students will have a chance to use the Wii video game system for some physical education classes starting soon. Not every student can play soccer or kickball during physical education due to their disabilities, and the Wii system is helpful for disabled kids to learn eye-hand … Continue reading Wii in lieu of P.E.? →

Teens Use Social Media to Protest Media Ban

By Sara Bernard If you ask a typical teenager, iPods and MP3 players are essential technologies and important part of their lives. That’s why, when a high school in Natick, Massachusetts proposed a ban of the audio devices on campus, students staged a protest — using, what else, technology. To make their case against teachers … Continue reading Teens Use Social Media to Protest Media Ban →

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