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Technology in Schools

What Works in Tech Tools: Spotlight on ClassDojo

ClassDojo With the thousands of ed-tech tools available to teachers, it can be difficult to find those that work well and complement teaching strategies. It takes a lot of time to research and integrate, and for teachers in cash-strapped schools, access to some technology is completely out of their reach. Sam Chaudhary and Liam Don, … Continue reading What Works in Tech Tools: Spotlight on ClassDojo →

What’s Worth Investing In? How to Decide What Technology You Need

Lenny Gonzalez The promise of technology in the pursuit of learning is vast — and so are the profits. The SIIA valued the ed-tech market at $7.5 billion. With daily launches of new products promising to solve all manner of problems — from managing classrooms to engaging bored students with interactive content to capturing and … Continue reading What’s Worth Investing In? How to Decide What Technology You Need →

Survey: Despite Budget Cuts, Schools Prioritize Technology

By Karen Billings, Vice President of Education, SIIA Despite having to contend with deep budget cuts, schools are able to maintain current levels of technology growth, a surprising find from a recent survey by the Software & Information Industry Association. In its annual Vision K-20 Survey, which included 1,600 responders and comparisons over three years of … Continue reading Survey: Despite Budget Cuts, Schools Prioritize Technology →

Schools and Students Clash Over Use of Technology

By Katrina Schwartz When it comes to using technology in school, the tension between what students and parents want and what schools allow is becoming more apparent — and more divisive. Students want more control over how they use technology in school, but many classrooms are still making it difficult. That’s according to the most … Continue reading Schools and Students Clash Over Use of Technology →

When Technologies Collide: Consumer, K-12 and Higher Ed

By Frank Catalano Schools have been adopting iPads with lightning speed  — more than 1.5 million have already been distributed to students, a mere two years after the original iPad launch. But beyond Apple’s influence in education, the high-profile tablet appears to be the poster child for a different trend. Call it the consumerization of … Continue reading When Technologies Collide: Consumer, K-12 and Higher Ed →

Teaching Without Technology?

Lenny Gonzales By Aran Levasseur New technology is a lightning rod and polarizing force because it not only begins to influence what we see and how we see it, but, over time, who we are, writes Nicholas Carr in his book, “The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains.” It makes sense then, … Continue reading Teaching Without Technology? →

Deconstructing “What Works” in Education Technology

TB Over the weekend, The New York Times published the second story in its series on “Grading the Digital School.” The first story in the series questioned the massive expenditures schools make on education technology, pointing to stagnant test scores as an indication that these investments might not be worth it. Last weekend’s story extends … Continue reading Deconstructing “What Works” in Education Technology →

Applying the 7 Golden Rules: One Teacher’s Take of Technology

TB In response to the article The 7 Golden Rules of Using Technology in Schools, teacher Patti Grayson wrote a point-by-point summary of exactly how it plays out in her class. Here’s her take. By Patti Grayson Along with some colleagues in our lower school division, I lobbied to use money normally spent on workbooks … Continue reading Applying the 7 Golden Rules: One Teacher’s Take of Technology →

In Classroom of Future, Outdated Testing Can’t Keep Up

Flickr:AlbertoGP Sunday’s New York Times article, “In Classroom of Future, Stagnant Scores” by Matt Richtel had the wrong headline. When describing a classroom in Arizona’s Kyrene School District, which invested $33 million from a ballot initiative dedicated to technology upgrades, Richtel laments the district’s “stagnant scores” in reading and math. He writes: “Critics counter that, … Continue reading In Classroom of Future, Outdated Testing Can’t Keep Up →

Students Demand Change in Their Own Education

In January, a group of gifted middle school students in North Texas hatched a plan. They decided to send a message as far and wide as it could go on the Internet about an issue that affects them personally: their education. “We need a new school system, one that mixes collaboration with achievement, excellence with … Continue reading Students Demand Change in Their Own Education →

Technology: Not a Silver Bullet, But Makes Learning Relevant

“I don’t believe that cyberlearning is the silver bullet to take over schools and make us better,” says Kenneth Eastwood, Superintendent of Middletown City School District in Ohio. “It is to make us more efficient and relevant to the process related to the learners of today, and once, I think, that everybody agrees upon that … Continue reading Technology: Not a Silver Bullet, But Makes Learning Relevant →

Where Does Informal Learning Fit In?

With so much rich information for learners available and accessible on the Internet — everything from how to play the guitar to applications of the Pythagorean Theorem — how can the formal education system leverage all this within schools? There are tremendous obstacles in the way. A shortage of high-quality K-12 STEM teachers, dwindling interest … Continue reading Where Does Informal Learning Fit In? →

Tech and Learning: At Odds in School, in Sync Everywhere Else

The culture of current public school model can’t be more different than the culture of technology, says Allan Collins, co-author of Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology. In most public schools, every student learns the same things at the same time. The teacher is the content expert and controls what students learn. Testing is … Continue reading Tech and Learning: At Odds in School, in Sync Everywhere Else →

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