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STEM

More Doodling Makes For Better Learning

Science Doodling is often seen as a sign of distraction. If you’re doodling, you’re not paying attention. If you’re drawing, you’re not taking notes. You’re not listening. You’re not learning. But research published in the latest edition of the journal Science challenges the anti-doodling stance. It contends that not only can doodling help students learn, … Continue reading More Doodling Makes For Better Learning →

A Web-Based Microscope for the Pros is Open to All Students

One of the promises of the Internet is to put resources into the hands of those who wouldn’t otherwise be able to access them. We often think of that in terms of information and data. But as the Imaging Technology Group at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign demonstrates, the Internet can … Continue reading A Web-Based Microscope for the Pros is Open to All Students →

Math and Science: Out of the Classroom, Into the World

It’s great to be a student these days. The opportunities to learn math, science, technology and engineering have come such a long way from the days of sitting through interminable hours of watching teachers solve equations and explain complicated theories on the chalkboard. Witnessing how technology has redefined learning makes me wish I could start school … Continue reading Math and Science: Out of the Classroom, Into the World →

What Role Do Corporations Play in Supporting STEM Education?

Last week, as part of the Imagine Cup award ceremony, Hal Plotkin, the Senior Policy Advisor in the Office of the Under Secretary of Education, praised Microsoft for its commitment to STEM education with its hosting of the global student technology competition. Plotkin encouraged other companies to step up and invest in these sorts of … Continue reading What Role Do Corporations Play in Supporting STEM Education? →

Computer Science With a Twist: Students Hack into Kinect

Within the first 60 days of its release, Microsoft sold some eight million Kinects, making it the fastest selling consumer electronics device in history (beating out the iPad and the VCR). For those who aren’t familiar with it yet, Kinect is a sensor input device for the popular Xbox gaming console that allows gamers to … Continue reading Computer Science With a Twist: Students Hack into Kinect →

Preventing the Summer Slide with DIY Tech and Science Projects

Continuing our summer slide series, in which we’ve offered ideas on how to keep learners’ math and literacy skills sharpened, we now turn our focus to science and tech-related ideas. The summer months provide a great opportunity for students to work on projects that help extend some of the ideas they might have learned during … Continue reading Preventing the Summer Slide with DIY Tech and Science Projects →

It’s Here: A Science Book That’s Always Up-to-Date

As much people still love their textbooks, there are inherent problems. They’re expensive. They’re heavy. And oftentimes, they’re woefully out-of-date. The latter is particularly true when it comes to science books — by the time a textbook hits store shelves (and appears in syllabi), new research outdates the text. Such is the changing nature of … Continue reading It’s Here: A Science Book That’s Always Up-to-Date →

Animal Dissection? There’s an App for That

Animal dissection is one of the most controversial topics in science education. Scientists, teachers, animal rights activists, and parents and students all have a opinion about whether animal dissection is necessary or even educational. But despite strong arguments on both sides, it remains a core part of many schools’ biology curriculum. In addition to controversies … Continue reading Animal Dissection? There’s an App for That →

Can Cell Phones Fry Your Brain? Ask Student Scientists!

Teenagers love to sleep with their cell phones under their pillows. Knowing this, high school chemistry teacher Tanya Katovich from Palatine, Illinois, decided to leverage it as a way to get her students interested in conducting a science experiment. “For a student, the second you bring up a cell phone, that’s fascinating to them,” she … Continue reading Can Cell Phones Fry Your Brain? Ask Student Scientists! →

“Mystery Device” Makes Math Fun

Proving that learning math can be fun, Dor Abrahamson, assistant professor of cognition and development at UC Berkeley, demonstrates Kinemathics from the Mathematic Imagery Trainer at the recent Cyberlearning Tools for STEM Education conference. The premise is to teach kids in grades 4-6 how to remote-manipulate virtual objects on a computer screen in order to … Continue reading “Mystery Device” Makes Math Fun →

Can a Smart Phone Program Really Close the Achievement Gap?

Students from different geographic regions communicate socially, but also to help each other achieve the common goal of succeeding at Algebra 1. When asked what tech tools students would like to use in learning science and math, their reply was no surprise: “They said they wanted something that would utilize social networking technology — something … Continue reading Can a Smart Phone Program Really Close the Achievement Gap? →

Virtual Worlds in the Hands of Student Scientists

Can video games really work as a learning tool? If so, what happens to the role of the teacher in this realm? Chris Dede and his colleagues at Harvard Graduate School of Education have been working on testing these theories and have come up with fascinating results. I spoke with Dede at the Cyberlearning Tools … Continue reading Virtual Worlds in the Hands of Student Scientists →

Video Games and Simulations Bring Science to Life

Science textbooks might be gathering dust in some classrooms across the country, but that doesn’t mean students aren’t learning. Whether it’s determining if cell phone radiation is harmful or it’s using the premise of Space Invaders to calculate probabilities, some lucky students are using the latest high tech to learn science and theories. As the … Continue reading Video Games and Simulations Bring Science to Life →

Scientists Recruit Students for Research

By Sara Bernard Scientists have figured out a way to leverage student enthusiasm in the sciences: conduct research that can be used for data collection. So when ornithologists at Cornell University study breeding and nesting behavior, when NASA researchers need an extra few thousand pairs of eyes on a telescope, and when biologists and gardeners … Continue reading Scientists Recruit Students for Research →

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