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Reading

Why Kids Should Be Allowed to Act Out (Scenes) In Class

For children, acting out words on the page can yield benefits. Especially for beginning readers, physically moving objects or one’s own body can provide a crucial bridge between real-life people, things, and actions, and the printed words meant to represent them. Fluent readers take this correspondence for granted, but many children find it difficult to grasp.

How to Get Kids Hooked on Nonfiction Books This Summer

The long hot days of summer are the perfect time for kids to hone their knowledge of the wizard world, King Arthur’s court or the magical land of Narnia. And while many summer reading lists are sent home with the hope that students will bone up on fiction during the dog days, reading nonfiction can be just as beneficial -- and just as exciting -- as a great novel.

The Case for Preserving the Pleasure of Deep Reading

The deep reading of books and the information-driven reading we do on the web are very different, both in the experience they produce and in the capacities they develop. Recent research has demonstrated that deep reading—slow, immersive, rich in sensory detail and emotional and moral complexity—is a distinctive experience, different in kind from the mere decoding of words.

Going Retro: Reading Apps for Real Books

Reading Rainbow app YouTube clips. Texting. Twitter. Facebook status updates. The prevalence of short-attention-span media — easily scanned or consumed — has led to much hand-wringing over how students will develop that lifelong love of reading perceived to be so critical to lifelong learning. One answer (in addition to “it’s not as bad as you … Continue reading Going Retro: Reading Apps for Real Books →

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