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Project Based Learning

Educators use Project Based Learning to allow students to make projects as they learn certain subjects.

Video: “The Future Will Not be Multiple Choice”

Educator Jaime McGrath and designer Drew Davies explain how to create a “classroom of imagination” by turning lessons into design problems and giving students space to be creative in this Tedx video. In a New York Times op-ed The MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning Competition’s co-director Cathy Davidson said she thinks it’s possible that … Continue reading Video: “The Future Will Not be Multiple Choice” →

How Can Teachers Prepare Kids for a Connected World?

Educators are always striving to find ways to make curriculum relevant in students’ everyday lives. More and more teachers are using social media around lessons, allowing students to use their cell phones to do research and participate in class, and developing their curriculum around projects to ground learning around an activity. These strategies are all … Continue reading How Can Teachers Prepare Kids for a Connected World? →

What Project-Based Learning Is — and What It Isn’t

Screenshot/High Tech High The term “project-based learning” gets tossed around a lot in discussions about how to connect students to what they’re learning. Teachers might add projects meant to illustrate what students have learned, but may not realize what they’re doing is actually called “project-oriented learning.” And it’s quite different from project-based learning, according to … Continue reading What Project-Based Learning Is — and What It Isn’t →

The Far-Flung Reach of Caine’s Arcade

Who knew a YouTube video of a nine-year-old boy’s cardboard creation would hit such a nerve? Caine’s Arcade, which has gotten more than 7 million views on YouTube and Vimeo since it was posted last April, inspired a global movement, compelling kids across the world to create their own versions of the cardboard masterpiece in … Continue reading The Far-Flung Reach of Caine’s Arcade →

Should Math and Science Teachers Get Special Training?

By Anne Jolly Excited and inspired about the subjects they teach, math and science educators ideally want their classrooms to dive into real-world challenges. But they’re faced with the predictable realities of the school day when designing their curriculum. Each year, students seem to lose interest as the subjects become more difficult and abstract. “And … Continue reading Should Math and Science Teachers Get Special Training? →

Why Learning Should Be Messy

The following is an excerpt of One Size Does Not Fit All: A Student’s Assessment of School, by 17-year-old Nikhil Goyal, a senior at Syosset High School in Woodbury, New York. Can creativity be taught? Absolutely. The real question is: “How do we teach it?” In school, instead of crossing subjects and classes, we teach … Continue reading Why Learning Should Be Messy →

Why Kids Need Schools to Change

The current structure of the school day is obsolete, most would agree. Created during the Industrial Age, the assembly line system we have in place now has little relevance to what we know kids actually need to thrive. Most of us know this, and yet making room for the huge shift in the system that's necessary has been difficult, if not impossible because of fear of the unknown.

Lessons Learned: How a Progressive New School Adapts to Realities

When we envision a well-rounded, progressive education for our kids, we think of a vibrant environment that nurtures students’ passions, provides structure for rich and deep learning, a place where kids can get their hands on projects that are meaningful to them. That’s the goal at Brightworks, a small, K-12 private school just starting its … Continue reading Lessons Learned: How a Progressive New School Adapts to Realities →

Seven Fun (and Cheap) Class Projects to Try with Video

By Hall Davidson For educators interested in incorporating video into classroom lessons, here are seven projects to dive into. 1.   TURN AN iPAD OR (OTHER MOBILE DEVICE) INTO A VIDEO MICROSCOPE. For less than $8, an iPad can be used as a 45x microscope to capture still images or videos from leaves, household objects, insects, … Continue reading Seven Fun (and Cheap) Class Projects to Try with Video →

What’s the Best Way to Practice Project Based Learning?

TB By Peter Skillen Project Based Learning can mean different things to different people, and can be practiced in a variety of ways. For educators who want to dive in, the good news is that a rich trove of resources are available. In order to create your own definition and practice, here are some parameters … Continue reading What’s the Best Way to Practice Project Based Learning? →

Building a Bridge to Summer with Projects

By Matt Levinson The month of May can be a tough time for schools. The end of the year brings mixed emotions for students, teachers and parents, as they prepare for transition into the summer months. Keeping the same routines can be reassuring for some, but recasting school in terms of time and space can … Continue reading Building a Bridge to Summer with Projects →

Life in a 21st-Century English Class

Creating a Common Craft-style video is part of the classroom assignment. By Shelley Wright I  teach in an inquiry, project-based, technology embedded classroom. A mouthful, I know. So what does that mean? To begin with, I don’t lecture. My students don’t take notes, at least not in the traditional sense, and we don’t read a … Continue reading Life in a 21st-Century English Class →

Can Learning How to Blog Change Makeal’s Life?

How can learning to blog make a lasting impact on a 12-year-old boy living in a rough, East Oakland neighborhood? In the second installment of MindShift’s My Education series, which examines whether technology in learning can have a lasting impact on low-income kids through the perspective of one child, the question focuses on Makeal Surrell, … Continue reading Can Learning How to Blog Change Makeal’s Life? →

What Does a Great School Year Look Like? Ask the Students

This past school year, Shelley Wright, a high school educator in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, made a number of big changes in her teaching practice. The class went paperless and used a Wiki, she incorporated project-based learning and collaboration into her lessons, she experimented with “vessays.” All along the way, she documented everything on her blog … Continue reading What Does a Great School Year Look Like? Ask the Students →

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