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digital textbooks

5 Reasons E-Books Are Awesome – Even for the Most Reluctant

By Jenny Shank When Amazon first introduced the Kindle in 2007, I had no desire to own one. I was happy with regular papery books. When the iPad went on sale in 2010, it was harder for me to resist. I’ve been using Macs, and Macs only, since I was a 6-year-old trying to ford … Continue reading 5 Reasons E-Books Are Awesome – Even for the Most Reluctant →

Can Digital Comic Books Spark a Love of Reading?

It has been a bitter pill for me to swallow as a parent and as a bibliophile: my son does not love to read. Sure, I read to him daily when he was a toddler, and even once he learned to read to himself, we still spent many evenings reading books aloud as a family. … Continue reading Can Digital Comic Books Spark a Love of Reading? →

South Korean Schools Go Paperless. Can Others Follow?

South Korea’s Education Ministry announced last week that it plans to replace all printed textbooks with digital versions in the next four years. It’s part of a larger effort to integrate technology into all aspects of the South Korean education system, including moving all nationwide academic exams online and offering more online classes. The Education … Continue reading South Korean Schools Go Paperless. Can Others Follow? →

Watch Out, Print Textbooks: Here Comes Inkling

Whether it’s the iPad that will shake up the print book industry, or some other tablet, it’s evident that education textbook publishers are going to have to adapt to the digital world. Since the iPad is still the front-runner in the education realm, publishers have to learn to think of it not just as another … Continue reading Watch Out, Print Textbooks: Here Comes Inkling →

It’s Here: A Science Book That’s Always Up-to-Date

As much people still love their textbooks, there are inherent problems. They’re expensive. They’re heavy. And oftentimes, they’re woefully out-of-date. The latter is particularly true when it comes to science books — by the time a textbook hits store shelves (and appears in syllabi), new research outdates the text. Such is the changing nature of … Continue reading It’s Here: A Science Book That’s Always Up-to-Date →

Algebra, Meet the iPad: Part II

The iPad’s impact on the role of the teacher, paid content versus free online and open-source content, and the learning process. Will eighth-graders who use the iPad to learn algebra do better than their textbook-using counterparts? That’s what publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt’s Fuse pilot program will determine at the end of the school year. In … Continue reading Algebra, Meet the iPad: Part II →

How Free is “Free”?

The article about CK12’s open-source digital FlexBooks compelled a reader to respond with some  questions. He writes: I have developed a strong interest in open or free text ever since I purchased a brand new grey-market, European textbook for 60 dollars, a full third of what Americans pay for the same biology book. I also … Continue reading How Free is “Free”? →

The “Living Book” Movement: Free Education For All

By Sara Bernard They’re free, they’re customizable, and they meet state standards. Those are the three biggest selling points of CK12 Flexbooks, digital educational content for K-12 schools. FlexBooks are developed through a combination of author donations, licensing partnerships, university collaborations, and incentives for community-based authorship, and teachers can customize them to their hearts’ content. … Continue reading The “Living Book” Movement: Free Education For All →

Google and Amazon Battle Over the Book Market

Following in the heels of Google’s big headliner about its new eBooks software yesterday, Amazon announced its own web-based e-reader, according to the Wall Street Journal. From the article: Asked how the new Amazon feature might change the competitive landscape, Google spokeswoman Jeannie Hornung said, “Google eBooks is a competitive offering.” A key difference for … Continue reading Google and Amazon Battle Over the Book Market →

Will College Textbooks Be Obsolete?

By Sara Bernard These days, college students have many more options for buying less expensive versions of their required texts. With sites like Amazon, Half.com, and Craigslist, as well as textbook rental programs, they no longer have to rely on those heavy, expensive texts. Online textbooks that use open source software — which are becoming … Continue reading Will College Textbooks Be Obsolete? →

Getting E-Readers into Schools, One Class at a Time

Everyday, rolling carts full of laptops and mobile devices are wheeled through the halls of four high schools in the Acalanes Unified School District, delivering gadgets to students who use them to study science, English, and foreign language, among other subjects. The mobile devices — whether it’s the iPod Touch, the iPad, the Kindle or … Continue reading Getting E-Readers into Schools, One Class at a Time →

Students Need Both Tech Tools and Teachers

In the age of the technology avalanche, what happens to a teacher’s role? Cheryl Davis, District Curriculum & Instruction Technology Specialist at Acalanes Unified School District says they’re crucial to the equation. “A good teacher is a good teacher. The added value they bring as our kids move forward in this world, to have experiences … Continue reading Students Need Both Tech Tools and Teachers →

What Do Teenagers Think About E-Books? Not Much.

Would you trade your textbooks for e-books, asks the New York Times Learning Network of students 13 years or older. The responses are all over the map depending on whether they’re reading for school or for pleasure. Anecdotal quotes like those below are predominantly against e-readers, from what seems to be kids who haven’t had … Continue reading What Do Teenagers Think About E-Books? Not Much. →

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