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digital-divide

Alex Tu, left, an Advanced Placement student, works during a computer science class in Midwest City, Okla. There's been a sharp decline in the number of computer science classes offered in U.S. secondary schools.

Demand for Computer Science Classes Grows, Along With Digital Divide

It's estimated that only about 10 percent of K-12 schools teach computer science. Some companies are trying to fill a void in American public education by teaching kids computer programming basics. The push comes amid projections that there will be far more tech sector jobs than computer science graduates to fill them.

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Internet Access for All: A New Program Targets Low-Income Students

Getty Technology has often been called a democratizer in education, allowing students from all backgrounds to access the same resources and tools. Others see potential for technology to do great harm, widening an already substantial achievement gap related to issues of equity. Access to technology costs money and some fear lower-income schools and students will … Continue reading Internet Access for All: A New Program Targets Low-Income Students →

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For Low-Income Kids, Access to Devices Could Be the Equalizer

No device should ever be hailed as the silver bullet in “saving” education — nor should it be completely shunned — but when it comes to the possibility of bridging the digital divide between low-income and high-income students, devices may play a pivotal role. Access to the Internet connects kids to all kinds of information … Continue reading For Low-Income Kids, Access to Devices Could Be the Equalizer →

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