Ian Quillen

Parents Want Kids to Use Mobile Devices in Schools

Smartphones, tablets, and other mobile devices have gained popularity as educational tools in part because of the belief those devices could cut across the digital divide created by socioeconomic boundaries. Now a new study reinforces that perspective, finding that students’ access to mobile devices, in this country anyway, is more often a question of parents’ … Continue reading Parents Want Kids to Use Mobile Devices in Schools →

Game On: Physics Teacher Creates World of Classcraft

In creating World of Classcraft, a not-so-subtle nod to the world’s most popular online role-playing game, Quebec-based physics teacher Shawn Young has turned the everyday interactions of his classroom into a quest to gain special powers and avoid death. In a manner similar to other role-playing games, students assume a class—in this case a Mage, … Continue reading Game On: Physics Teacher Creates World of Classcraft →

A Design Challenge to Students: Solve a Real-World Problem!

Creating a safe recreation space for teens; protoyping a recyclable lunch tray; setting up a water delivery system to guard against urban fires; building a public awareness campaign to combat hunger. These are just a few of examples of the types of tasks students are taking on when they participate in the Design Learning Challenge, … Continue reading A Design Challenge to Students: Solve a Real-World Problem! →

Money Smarts: How to Promote Financial Literacy With Students

Those of us who just filed our taxes, or paid our bills, or calculated our monthly expenditures know the importance of having a solid base of financial literacy. For students, it’s just as important to have this base knowledge to prepare them for the real world, so in observation of Financial Literacy Month, here are … Continue reading Money Smarts: How to Promote Financial Literacy With Students →

Why Do Students Enroll in (But Don’t Complete) MOOC Courses?

Less than 10 percent of MOOC students, on average, complete a course. That’s the conclusion of Katy Jordan of Open University, who published her analysis, pulled together from available data of some Massively Open Online Courses, or MOOCs. But do completion rates matter? It’s not that course completion rates don’t inform observers about the nature … Continue reading Why Do Students Enroll in (But Don’t Complete) MOOC Courses? →

How Mozilla’s Open Badges May Work In the Real World

After 18 months in the darkness of beta world, Mozilla’s Open Badges project stepped out into the light recently with the unveiling of Open Badges 1.0. But will the concept of organizations bestowing their own virtual endorsements for the mastery of skills hold up to critical examination from a world that, even in an information … Continue reading How Mozilla’s Open Badges May Work In the Real World →

Study: Path Through College is Indirect and Stressful for Many Students

Despite a deeply held belief that success in college is crucial for success in life, the traditional path students assume they’ll take is more an exception than the rule, according to a new report. Though most students believe the college path — high school, college with chosen major, internship, job — will smoothly go from … Continue reading Study: Path Through College is Indirect and Stressful for Many Students →

Student Mentors: How 6th and 12th Graders Learn From Each Other

When Tracy Edwards posted on Facebook last October that she was searching for a part-time writing instructor for a middle school program, Kip Glazer jumped immediately at the chance. But Glazer wasn’t applying for herself. Instead, she envisioned her 100 senior high school English students, who were about to become virtual writing mentors to 200 … Continue reading Student Mentors: How 6th and 12th Graders Learn From Each Other →

How to Help Mobile Education Go Global

For many of us, the conversation around mobile learning has shifted from asking whether mobile devices present educational opportunities to how they might best do so. From that second question, a new initiative has been launched: SMILE, the Stanford Mobile Inquiry Learning Environment, an idea, which, in practice, is almost staggeringly simple. Essentially, SMILE is … Continue reading How to Help Mobile Education Go Global →

What Will It Take to Bring Mobile Ed to the Developing World?

In developing countries, where smartphones and dependable cellular networks are still scarce, it’s been difficult to gauge the real impact of the mobile education movement. But with the combination of different factors — the advent of new technology, decreased pricing for data, a worldwide lust for mobile education, and a persisting patience for smaller screens … Continue reading What Will It Take to Bring Mobile Ed to the Developing World? →

How to Fuel Students’ Learning Through Their Interests

For David Preston, the term “open source learning” — a variation on inquiry learning or passion-based learning —  is about helping students choose their own learning path, an approach that already has some well-known champions among educators. “When I think of ‘open source,’ it isn’t about software, but thermodynamic systems,” said Preston, who currently teaches … Continue reading How to Fuel Students’ Learning Through Their Interests →

Tips for Sharing Great Open Educational Content

While the open content movement in education continues to gain steam, more teachers are starting to learn about free content they can use and adapt to their own needs for their classrooms. But educators are focusing too heavily on acquiring content, rather than contributing and improving to it, according to a company that helps teachers … Continue reading Tips for Sharing Great Open Educational Content →