Audrey Watters

Is It Possible to Combine TV and Active Play?

Daniel Choo Earlier this fall, Microsoft announced that its Xbox 360 would soon offer special games and TV shows associated with several well-known children’s programs, including Sesame Street and Nat Geo Wild. The plan, says Microsoft, is to create shows that would foster a new kind of “playful learning,” tying them to the capabilities of … Continue reading Is It Possible to Combine TV and Active Play? →

Rewards of Role Reversal: Teachers Learn, Students Teach

Lenny Gonzales All too often, schools find that they’ve invested heavily in education technology only to see these tools unused or classroom instruction unchanged. That was one of the realizations of the Oak Hills Local School District (OHLSD), a tech-friendly district in Cincinnati, Ohio. Even though the district had adopted an “anywhere, anytime, any device” … Continue reading Rewards of Role Reversal: Teachers Learn, Students Teach →

Awesome New Apps for Building, Reading, X-Raying and More

A review of our favorite educational apps released or updated in the past month. (Read all of our Educational Apps series.) Below you’ll find a mixture of iOS, Android, and Web-based apps. MINECRAFT (POCKET EDITION). We’ve written before about the educational potentials of Minecraft, the open-ended, world-building game. November marked a couple of important milestones: … Continue reading Awesome New Apps for Building, Reading, X-Raying and More →

Libraries and Museums Become Hands-On Learning Labs

YOUmedia Earlier this month, we covered the Fayetteville Free Library‘s new Fab Lab, the public library’s plans to build a “makerspace” where library patrons could gain hands-on experience using 3D printers and other tools and could take programming and “shop” classes. It’s part of a larger movement to rethink and re-imagine what a public library … Continue reading Libraries and Museums Become Hands-On Learning Labs →

Considering College During a Recession? Think Again.

Flickr:BradleyGee “I’m going back to school.” It’s a common decision when someone wants a job promotion or a career change. And that’s especially the case during an economic downturn. Can’t find a job? Go back to school. More education can mean job re-training, or it can simply mean a time-out from the work world altogether … Continue reading Considering College During a Recession? Think Again. →

What Would You Pay for a Great Educational App?

Walk the aisles of any toy store and you’ll see miles of shelves lined with $20-$30 board games and toys. We’re accustomed to paying that amount because that’s where that the market set the price years ago. It’s predicated on production costs, overhead for toy manufacturers, distribution, and the store’s cut of the margin, among … Continue reading What Would You Pay for a Great Educational App? →

Teaching Kids About Entrepreneurship, One Ladybug at a Time

We start teaching kids about jobs and professions at an early age. By elementary school, they know what doctors, scientists, farmers and firefighters do. In some cases, there are supporting programs to help kids gain knowledge and hands-on experience needed for those careers and to put them in touch with those who work in the … Continue reading Teaching Kids About Entrepreneurship, One Ladybug at a Time →

Can 35,000 People Learn Anything from an Online Class?

This summer, Stanford University announced its plans to make three of its introductory computer science classes available for free to the general public. The classes — Machine Learning, Introduction to Databases, and Introduction to Artificial Intelligence — were to be taught by Stanford faculty and held online in conjunction with the regular on campus courses … Continue reading Can 35,000 People Learn Anything from an Online Class? →

The Public Library, Completely Reimagined

You’ll hear a lot of talk about the “death of the public library” these days. It isn’t simply the perpetual budget crises that many face either. It’s the move to digital literature, and the idea that once there are no more print books (or rather if there are no more print books), the library as … Continue reading The Public Library, Completely Reimagined →

Is New York City’s General Assembly the University of the Future?

What is a university? There’s a legal answer to that question, of course, as well as historical, philosophical, instructional, and civic. And strictly by some of these definitions, General Assembly doesn’t qualify as a university. There are no degrees awarded. There is no .edu Web domain. There is no football team. And yet the New … Continue reading Is New York City’s General Assembly the University of the Future? →

Why Aren’t Students Using E-Books?

Kathryn Though we keep hearing about a huge increase in sales of e-books, a recent survey shows that, for students, that needle has not really moved much. The library e-book provider eBrary released some of the preliminary results from its 2011 Global Student E-Book Survey last week. Among its findings: that students’ e-book usage has … Continue reading Why Aren’t Students Using E-Books? →

Some Help With Solving the Rubix Cube

Remember playing with the Rubix Cube as a kid? The 3D puzzle was invented in 1974 by Hungarian sculptor Ernő Rubik, but it wasn’t until the 1980s that the toy was licensed and sold widely. Since then, some 350 million Rubix Cubes have been sold. That figure doesn’t include the variations — the 2×2, 4×4, … Continue reading Some Help With Solving the Rubix Cube →

Plagiarism Differences in High School and College Students

A report released today by the plagiarism-detection tool TurnItIn confirms what a lot of teachers already know: that students are copying content from online sources. According to the report, for both high school and college students, Wikipedia and Yahoo Answers were the top two most popular sources of lifted copy. But another interesting fact emerged … Continue reading Plagiarism Differences in High School and College Students →

E-Readers Help Spread Literacy, No Apps Needed

Worldreader We often talk about the power of the Internet to spread knowledge and information globally, to make digital content accessible and affordable. But as we’re also often caught up in the “latest and greatest” gadgetry, sometimes we overlook that broad promise of global education and accessibility. Such is the case, one might argue, with … Continue reading E-Readers Help Spread Literacy, No Apps Needed →