” credit=”Flickr: Flickingerbrad

No longer relegated to experimental programs, digital games are becoming much more commonly used in classrooms across the country, according to a survey by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center released today.

Half of the 505 K-8 teachers surveyed said they use digital games with their students two or more days a week, and 18 percent use them daily.

There will be further, more in-depth coverage of this report in the coming weeks, but in the meantime, some more statistics from the study:

  • Nearly 70 percent said that “lower-performing students engage more with subject content with use of digital games.”
  • Three-fifths reported “increased attention to specific tasks and improved collaborations among all students.”
  • Sixty percent said using digital games “helps personalize instruction and better assess student knowledge and learning.”
  • Though most use Apple or PC computers, 25 percent said their students use iPads or tablet computers, and less than 10 percent use other mobile devices or video game consoles.
  • 62% said games make it easier to level lessons and effectively teach the range of learners in their class.

Teachers mostly used literacy (50 percent) and math (35 percent) games in class, and said the games’ alignment with Common Core State Standards was the most valuable quality, the study showed.

Teachers said that the cost of digital games was the primary obstacle to integrating them into class. But only 17% of those surveyed said the school spent $100 or more on games, and 40 percent were not sure. Lack of access to technology resources and emphasis on preparing for standardized testing were also listed as obstacles.

The majority of teachers surveyed taught K-5, and 86 percent teach in public schools — 60 percent of which are Title I schools. What’s more, 80 percent of teachers surveyed have been teaching for at least five years, and 20 percent have been teaching for more than 25 years.

Researchers of the study conclude that teachers need to be trained on how best to use these digital games — not just those who are unfamiliar with them, but even those who feel they’re moderately comfortable with using games.

The online survey, conducted last month by VeraQuest, sampled 505 school teachers who taught kindergarten through eighth grade in the U.S., and was meant to investigate what teachers think about digital games and how games impact students beyond academic achievement. Teachers were randomly selected from a targeted panel of K-8 grade classrooms that are “generally proportional of the demographic strata of total U.S. teachers,” according to the news announcement.

The survey also included a series of videos featuring case studies that can be viewed here.

The Teacher Attitudes about Digital Games in the Classroom survey is part of research conducted by the Games and Learning Publishing Council, convened by the Cooney Center and E-Line Media, and funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. The survey also received additional support from BrainPOP, which creates games for classrooms.

 

  • http://www.mindfulstew.wordpress.com/ Paul B.

    What needs to be explored further is just how useful these games are in promoting meaningful learning.  I’ll admit that the student engagement factor is a strong one–and very tempting for many teachers, including myself–to take advantage of.   If a kid engages with a screen, what are they missing out on?
    I utilized games when teaching remedial reading several years back, and it was easy to differentiate.  I felt like I was able to give all the students in the class something to do that was on their level.  As a teacher, I also felt like I wasn’t doing much besides pointing them in the direction of the right website.  http://www.mindfulstew.wordpress.com.

  • http://www.mindfulstew.wordpress.com/ Paul B.

    What needs to be explored further is just how useful these games are in promoting meaningful learning.  I’ll admit that the student engagement factor is a strong one–and very tempting for many teachers, including myself–to take advantage of.   If a kid engages with a screen, what are they missing out on?
    I utilized games when teaching remedial reading several years back, and it was easy to differentiate.  I felt like I was able to give all the students in the class something to do that was on their level.  As a teacher, I also felt like I wasn’t doing much besides pointing them in the direction of the right website.  http://www.mindfulstew.wordpress.com.

  • Tim Erickson

    Are you surprised by this result? Good. Be careful about your headline! 

    It’s not clear what the sample is. Certainly not all teachers. The web site says the sample is from a “national survey of 500 teachers who use digital games in their K–8 classrooms.” So you already have to use games to be in the survey.The sample description says it’s drawn randomly from a “targeted group.” What group? It could be from an online survey asking for teachers who use games; suppose 10,000 teachers respond. They pick 500 to follow up, using an online survey, to ask more detailed questions.So of teachers who already use games and will respond to an online survey, half of THEM use games twice a week or more in their classrooms. That’s an interesting result. But it does not mean that half of all teachers use online games.

  • Tim Erickson

    Are you surprised by this result? Good. Be careful about your headline! 

    It’s not clear what the sample is. Certainly not all teachers. The web site says the sample is from a “national survey of 500 teachers who use digital games in their K–8 classrooms.” So you already have to use games to be in the survey.

    The sample description says it’s drawn randomly from a “targeted group.” What group? It could be from an online survey asking for teachers who use games; suppose 10,000 teachers respond. They pick 500 to follow up, using an online survey, to ask more detailed questions.So of teachers who already use games and will respond to an online survey, half of THEM use games twice a week or more in their classrooms.

    That’s an interesting result. But it does not mean that half of all teachers use online games.

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  • http://bestonlinestreamingsite.blogspot.com/ Ninna Principessa

    I think this kind of education is the best, its fun and educational, and its a plus to know computers now and days.
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  • tamara lorens

    People in general learn more when they want to learn, and by knowing that kids love games this is one of best ways they easily to learn.

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