Good Read: How To Speak Like A Native

Can’t roll your R’s when speaking Spanish? Maybe you don’t need to: “Pronunciation can be learned—but it should be learned with the goal of communicating easily with others, not with achieving a textbook-perfect accent. Adult students of language should be guided by the ‘intelligibility principle,’ not the old ‘nativeness principle.'” Source: Time Can an adult … Continue reading Good Read: How To Speak Like A Native →

Is Learning Facts a Trivial Pursuit?

By Tasha Bergson-Michelson Dear Savvy Searcher, You wrote recently about the importance of teaching search skills. What do you make of the whole idea that kids no longer need to learn facts because they can find answers so easily online? Do you think that is true? Concerned Teacher When I was growing up, we used … Continue reading Is Learning Facts a Trivial Pursuit? →

Good Read: What Effect Do Hyperaddictive Games Have On Us?

The author of this article straddles two camps of thought about games: “Gamification seeks to turn the world into one giant chore chart covered with achievement stickers — the kind of thing parents design for their children — though it raises the potentially terrifying question of who the parents are” — and — “Part of … Continue reading Good Read: What Effect Do Hyperaddictive Games Have On Us? →

The Importance of Teaching Mindfulness

Flickr: ssoosay By Aran Levasseur Think of sitting quietly in a spartan room. There are no TVs, computers, smartphones, books, magazines or music. If you’re like most people, this probably sounds like a recipe for boredom. In our culture, we avoid moments of “not-doing” because we don’t associate boredom with having any value. And our … Continue reading The Importance of Teaching Mindfulness →

What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains

Getty Neuroscience may seem like an advanced subject of study, perhaps best reserved for college or even graduate school. Two researchers from Temple University in Philadelphia propose that it be taught earlier, however—much earlier. As in first grade. In a study published in this month’s issue of the journal Early Education and Development, psychologists Peter … Continue reading What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains →

Teachers and Students As Media Producers

Need a quick, fun dose of inspiration? Check out this video, The Infinite Thinking Machine, a new (well, technically, it’s re-launched) Internet TV show for educators. This eight-minute episode focuses on teachers and students as media producers, creating photos, videos, animation, and multi-media projects as storytelling devices. Produced by CUE, the host is Ramsey Musallam, … Continue reading Teachers and Students As Media Producers →

Quick Look: An Ivy League-Caliber Online College?

More disruption in higher ed, on the heels of MITx and Stanford’s free online courses: “Minerva Project, a for-profit undergraduate college based in San Francisco will offer rigorous courses designed by academic superstars. But Minerva will also require students to teach themselves everything from Spanish to macroeconomics.” Tuition has yet to be determined. Source: Mercurynews … Continue reading Quick Look: An Ivy League-Caliber Online College? →

What’s Inside Your Computer? These 6th-Graders Can Tell you

By Sheena Vaidyanathan Have you ever looked inside a laptop? Have you ever held a CPU or studied the components on a computer motherboard? Though we use computers everyday, many of us know little about the fascinating world inside. RELATED READING: WHY SHOULD FIFTH-GRADERS LEARN TO PROGRAM? INTRODUCING PROGRAMMING TO PRESCHOOLERS 5 TOOLS TO TEACH … Continue reading What’s Inside Your Computer? These 6th-Graders Can Tell you →

Quick Look: A Field Guide on How to Create an Innovator

Food for thought: “Every student starts school with unbounded imagination, curiosity and creativity – until he or she learns that knowing the right answer is far more important than asking a thoughtful question. So it isn’t so much about ‘think different,’ as Apple says, but acting differently and understanding where the reactions take you.” Source: … Continue reading Quick Look: A Field Guide on How to Create an Innovator →

Turning Teacher-Student Roles Upside Down

Upside Down Academy By Chris Thompson It’s a typical school day in Oakland, Calif., and Aaliyah is about to show how to solve two-step equations. Circling the three numbers in the equation 4x + 10 = 30, she says, “So one, two, three? Is a hater. They’re like haters… We trying to get rid of … Continue reading Turning Teacher-Student Roles Upside Down →

Quick Look: Kids Fail Less When They Know Failure Is Part of Learning

More research that backs the idea of redefining failure as part and parcel of learning rather than something to deride. Source: Go Kids perform better in school if they know failure, and trying again, is part of the learning process, according to a new study published by the American Psychological Association. The research included several … Continue reading Quick Look: Kids Fail Less When They Know Failure Is Part of Learning →

Student-Created Video Games Enter Science Class

Globaloria By Jennifer Roland Identifying bones in a skeleton, learning how chemical elements react, understanding alternative energy uses. These lessons have jumped out of the textbook and into the hands of students who created video games that teach the concepts to their peers. It’s part of Globaloria, a national program that allows middle school and … Continue reading Student-Created Video Games Enter Science Class →