Good Read: Lessons From the Incredible Story of Caine’s Arcade

From the story: “A sudden explosion of community has likely turned Caine into both a mentor and mentee. And the kids who are building and sharing their own cardboard creations can instantly see themselves as part of a real movement.” Source: Macfound 4.14.12 | Nine-year-old Caine Monroy spent last summer creating an elaborate cardboard arcade … Continue reading Good Read: Lessons From the Incredible Story of Caine’s Arcade →

Where’s the Joy in Learning?

Flickr:WoodleyWonderworks A school is not a desert of emotions,” begins an article by Finnish educators Taina Rantala and Kaarina Määttä, published last month in the journal Early Child Development and Care. But you’d never know that by looking at the scientific literature. “In the field of educational psychology, research on feelings is lacking,” the authors … Continue reading Where’s the Joy in Learning? →

Good Read: The Homework Trap and What To Do About It

Excellent strategies for parents about how to help kids negotiate homework time: Create a fixed time period, reduce penalties for being late or incomplete, respect teachers’ authority.   “It is critical for teachers to understand that homework assignments are using borrowed ground. Homework requires the tacit permission of the parents to allow it in their … Continue reading Good Read: The Homework Trap and What To Do About It →

Facebook Groups for Schools Raises Concerns

Filckr:Birgerking By Katrina Schwartz The explosive growth of online social media sites specifically targeted at schools has compelled Facebook to edge its way back into the fertile ground of college campuses. Last week, the company announced a new feature available only to students and faculty with an active .edu email address, Groups for Schools. It’s … Continue reading Facebook Groups for Schools Raises Concerns →

Pictures, Polls and Videos: How to Use Mobile Phones for Learning

Kids are using Instagram and Twitter in their daily lives outside of school, so why not let them use it for class studies too? This is just one example of many featured in this second episode of Infinite Thinking Machine, a Web TV show for teachers produced by Computer Using Educators (CUE), which shows how … Continue reading Pictures, Polls and Videos: How to Use Mobile Phones for Learning →

When Technologies Collide: Consumer, K-12 and Higher Ed

By Frank Catalano Schools have been adopting iPads with lightning speed  — more than 1.5 million have already been distributed to students, a mere two years after the original iPad launch. But beyond Apple’s influence in education, the high-profile tablet appears to be the poster child for a different trend. Call it the consumerization of … Continue reading When Technologies Collide: Consumer, K-12 and Higher Ed →

Good Read: Do Current Math Teaching Techniques Fail Even the Smartest Kids?

“Students are rarely asked to solve a problem they are not thoroughly familiar with,” Carol Lloyd writes. “Instead, they come to think of math as a series of rules to be memorized. The trouble is kids don’t necessarily learn how to attack a new or different kind of equation.” Source: Greatschools As sure as one … Continue reading Good Read: Do Current Math Teaching Techniques Fail Even the Smartest Kids? →

Apps Aimed at Kids Raise Privacy Concerns

TB By Eleanor Yang Su The number of mobile apps marketed to kids is growing at a rapid pace, yet a recent report by the Federal Trade Commission raises new concerns about child privacy and the lack of disclosure about the personal data being collected. The FTC reviewed the promotional pages for 400 apps aimed … Continue reading Apps Aimed at Kids Raise Privacy Concerns →

Quick Look: New Crop of Digital Science Books Change the Way Students Learn

And not just books from the big publishing companies — these include open education books written by volunteer marine scientists, designed by a computer science class, and donated images and video. Source: Scientificamerican Science can advance quickly, rendering existing textbooks obsolete. Now new digital textbooks are emerging intended to better engage students and keep them … Continue reading Quick Look: New Crop of Digital Science Books Change the Way Students Learn →

Do Students Really Have Different Learning Styles?

Lenny Gonzales Learning styles—the notion that each student has a particular mode by which he or she learns best, whether it’s visual, auditory or some other sense—is enormously popular. It’s also been thoroughly debunked. The scientific research on learning styles is “so weak and unconvincing,” concluded a group of distinguished psychologists in a 2008 review, … Continue reading Do Students Really Have Different Learning Styles? →

Learning to Read Goes High-Tech

A computer voice guides 12-year-old Amir Accoo to spell the words he hears through his headphones: emergency, bulldozer,  minutes. Accoo spells “minutes” wrong and is asked to try that one again, several times. Later, he clicks on a proofreading button. “You check what you have wrong out of the spelling words I just did,” Accoo … Continue reading Learning to Read Goes High-Tech →

Using Musical Notes to Teach Fractions

Caitlin Esch/KQED By Caitlin Esch Math teachers know that fractions can be hard for the average third-grader. Teachers at a public school in San Bruno, Calif., just south of San Francisco, are trying something new. They’re teaching difficult math concepts through music, and they’re getting remarkable results. At Allen Elementary School, a roomful of third-graders … Continue reading Using Musical Notes to Teach Fractions →

Do Students Have the Right to Post Negative Comments Online?

By Corey G. Johnson Civil rights groups recently intervened in a free-speech controversy at the San Francisco Unified School District after a school suspended three high school seniors and banned them from graduation and prom over comments they made online. The students were suspended from George Washington High School after a teacher learned about postings on … Continue reading Do Students Have the Right to Post Negative Comments Online? →

Students Redesign Their Own Schools

By Chris Thompson Up until a couple of years ago, the Chicago Architecture Foundation’s strategies were pretty ordinary: tours of interesting buildings around Chicago, or publishing a high school architecture textbook. But the foundation staff wanted to do try more interesting, a project that would compel students to really be immersed in the world of … Continue reading Students Redesign Their Own Schools →