How Social Networks Might Change the Way We Read Books

Reading hasn’t always been seen as a solitary act. Our first experiences with books demonstrate that: before we know how to read, we often have people — a parent, a teacher — reading out loud to us. But once we know how to read, there’s a sense that we’re supposed to read silently and oftentimes, … Continue reading How Social Networks Might Change the Way We Read Books →

Welcome to the Fall Semester

A few tips to keep in mind for students, educators, and administrators. But perhaps the best part of this piece is the link to The Allegory of the Grade. Food for thought. Source: Wired Sharpen your pencils and charge your laptops. It is time for the next semester to start. How about some tips to … Continue reading Welcome to the Fall Semester →

Where Does Disruption Begin? With Teachers Who Teach Teachers

Disrupting the entrenched education system is daunting. There are 7.2 million teachers in the U.S., 76 million students, and more than 98,000 public schools, according to a government census (as of 2008). So what’s the most effective way to unshackle the current archaic system from ineffective tactics that no longer work in the digital age? … Continue reading Where Does Disruption Begin? With Teachers Who Teach Teachers →

Why Are Manholes Round? The 10 Toughest Interview Questions

Are today’s graduates prepared to answer these interview questions, testing resourcefulness and critical thinking skills? Source: Forbes Why are manhole covers round? How do you measure 4 gallons of water using only a 3 and 5 gallon jug? How many gas stations/dogs/windowpanes are there in the United States? According to career community Glassdoor.com, these are … Continue reading Why Are Manholes Round? The 10 Toughest Interview Questions →

10 Reasons to Ban Pens and Pencils in the Class

A classic tongue-in-cheek MindShift post from last November is making the rounds on Twitter. For those who haven’t seen it yet, I’m happy to repost here, just in time for back-to-school. [A PARODY]   By Katie Stansberry According to a recent MSNBC article, 69% of high school currently ban cell phones. But you’d be hard-pressed … Continue reading 10 Reasons to Ban Pens and Pencils in the Class →

The Most Anticipated Tech Tools of Back-to-School 2011

Over the course of the last few weeks, I have been asking educators to tell me which new technology tool they were most looking forward to bringing with them back-to-school this fall. These didn’t have to be new tools per se; just new to the survey respondent for this school year. And these didn’t have … Continue reading The Most Anticipated Tech Tools of Back-to-School 2011 →

Math and Science: Out of the Classroom, Into the World

It’s great to be a student these days. The opportunities to learn math, science, technology and engineering have come such a long way from the days of sitting through interminable hours of watching teachers solve equations and explain complicated theories on the chalkboard. Witnessing how technology has redefined learning makes me wish I could start school … Continue reading Math and Science: Out of the Classroom, Into the World →

Weekly News Roundup

Department of Education Secretary Arne Duncan announced earlier this week that he is willing to override part of the No Child Left Behind law. States can apply for waivers, but “only states the administration believed were carrying out ambitious school improvement initiatives would get them,” reports The New York Times. E-textbook app maker Kno introduced … Continue reading Weekly News Roundup →

Scratch: Teaching the Difference Between Creating and Remixing

The introductory programming language Scratch is on the cusp of having its 2 millionth project uploaded to its website. That’s an impressive number, and one that points not just to the widespread adoption of Scratch by novice programmers, but to the growth of a vibrant community surrounding the programming language along with the stories and … Continue reading Scratch: Teaching the Difference Between Creating and Remixing →

Move Over, Sal Khan: Sixth-Graders Create Their Own Math Videos!

Eric Marcos is a sixth-grade math teacher at Lincoln Middle School in Santa Monica, California. But his kids stay after school, spend hours on their homework, and accompany him to education conferences (and even sometimes lead his presentations). None of Marcos’ students are doing this for extra credit. They’re simply learning a lot about math … Continue reading Move Over, Sal Khan: Sixth-Graders Create Their Own Math Videos! →

The Road to Entrepreneurship – With or Without A Degree

By Anne Raith Does school prepare students for life? Not necessarily, young entrepreneur Andrew Hsu might say. “At Stanford, I took every business course I could get my hands on. But I’ve actually found interestingly, that they weren’t that useful,” says the 20-year-old, who holds three college degrees in in Neurobiology, Biochemistry and Chemistry. “There … Continue reading The Road to Entrepreneurship – With or Without A Degree →

Mozilla’s Open Badges Project: A New Way to Recognize Learning

The Boy Scout’s badges are something we’re all familiar with: accomplish a task, learn a craft, demonstrate a skill, and you’re awarded a badge. It’s a symbol of your achievement, and one that’s recognized and recognizable by others. The Mozilla Foundation and Peer-to-Peer University (P2PU), among others, are working to take the idea of merit-earned … Continue reading Mozilla’s Open Badges Project: A New Way to Recognize Learning →

Questioning Facebook in School

Last week, I posted an article by OnlineCollege’s Carol Brown listing reasons to bring Facebook into the classroom. But as the comments reflect, educators are wary of opening what could be a Pandora’s box — and whether it’s worth the tradeoff. With last week’s news about Missouri banning teachers from private communication with students on … Continue reading Questioning Facebook in School →

Study Shows Adaptive Software Improves Students’ Math Scores

Can adaptive software — computer programs that adapt to students’ learning levels as they progress — make an impact on student achievement? Rocketship Education, a group of charter schools in the Bay Area, says they have the numbers to prove it. Rocketship schools use DreamBox Learning as part of their hybrid learning program, and commissioned … Continue reading Study Shows Adaptive Software Improves Students’ Math Scores →