To respond to the Do Now, you can comment below or tweet your response. Be sure to begin your tweet with @KQEDEdspace and end it with #DoNowInsects

For more info on how to use Twitter, click here.


Do Now

Would you eat insects as part of a sustainable, earth-friendly diet?

Introduction

As the California drought moves into its fourth year, the water shortage is shining a light on our agricultural industry–and the tastes and preferences of the people who drive it. Around the world, as countries’ economies develop and people gain the ability to purchase more expensive food, diets generally change to include more meat. With the global population slated to hit nine billion by the year 2050, and meat consumption increasing steadily around the world, our current land and water resources simply don’t supply enough animal protein to meet the future demand. While some people advocate vegetarianism or eating local to reduce agricultural waste and resource use, some scientists and chefs are suggesting a more extreme solution: eating insects, or “entomophagy.”

Before you gag, chew on this: nearly 80 percent of the global population eats insects as part of their normal diet, and insects are related to delicacies in western cuisine including shrimp, crayfish and lobsters. Insects are incredibly efficient as livestock; they convert a high percentage of their feed into protein, have less waste and consume less water. For example, raising a pound of crickets takes about a gallon of water, compared to the 2,500 gallons that goes into raising one pound of beef. And, less waste means that insects are more friendly for the planet because less waste means fewer greenhouse gas emissions, like methane and carbon dioxide. Depending on the variety, insects are also very nutritious — high in protein, low in fat and loaded with vitamins.

Many folks, though, worry about contamination and the cleanliness of insects in our diet. Insects collected from the wild may be exposed to pesticides and other chemical contaminants, and there are currently no regulations in place in the US to ensure that farmed insects are safe to eat, and little information is available about allergic reactions to insects. Furthermore, encouraging people to gather and eat wild insects comes with similar concerns as other wild edibles like mushrooms: many species may be toxic or venomous, and the resources and cultural know-how does not exist to keep consumers safe. At the same time, the FDA already has rules about how much insect protein is “acceptable” in the food we eat; any food processed in a factory, especially from plants, probably contains small levels of insect protein. (In the U.S., it’s acceptable to have up to 60 parts insect per 100 grams of chocolate — and that limit is for aesthetic, rather than health, reasons!)

What do you think? Would you eat insects as part of a sustainable, earth-friendly diet, or is it just a grub too far? What changes to your diet would you be willing to make?

Resource

VIDEO: Edible Insects: Finger Lickin’ Grub (KQED QUEST)
People around the world eat insects. This short video explores who eats what, and why some Americans are working to bring insect snacks into the mainstream.

Alternate video from PBS NewsHour: Incredible, Edible Bugs: Will Meals of Mealworms Catch on in U.S.?


To respond to the Do Now, you can comment below or tweet your response. Be sure to begin your tweet with @KQEDedspace and end it with #DoNowInsects

For more info on how to use Twitter, click here.

We encourage students to reply to other people’s tweets to foster more of a conversation. Also, if students tweet their personal opinions, ask them to support their ideas with links to interesting/credible articles online (adding a nice research component) or retweet other people’s ideas that they agree/disagree/find amusing. We also value student-produced media linked to their tweets. You can visit our video tutorials that showcase how to use several web-based production tools. Of course, do as you can… and any contribution is most welcomed.


More Resources

VIDEO: Should We Eat Bugs? (TED-Ed)
Need some compelling reasons to consider eating bugs? This short animated video explores the pros and cons of eating bugs, and why some scientists and chefs think we should.

INFOGRAPHIC: Beetlemania: Should We All Be Eating Insects? (The Guardian)
This infographic lays out the nutritional information and the environmental impacts of eating bugs.

AUDIO: Making Food From Flies (It’s Not That Icky) (NPR)
Hear how a company in Ohio turns fly larvae into food for animals and how this could be a step toward finding new sources of food for people.


KQED Education partners with phenomenal organizations to bring you the Science Do Now activities. The Science Do Now is posted every two weeks on Tuesday. This post was contributed by youth volunteers and interns in the Galaxy Explorers program at Chabot Space & Science Center. Explorers share science through live public demonstrations, hands-on activities, and outreach events in their schools and communities. Open to all Bay Area teens, the program focuses on providing support and opportunities in the sciences to Oakland youth historically underrepresented in STEM careers.

Chabot’s mission is to inspire and educate visitors about Planet Earth and the Universe through exhibits, telescope viewing, planetarium shows, interactive programs, and engaging experiences to connect visitors with the earth and environment, astronomy and space travel. Chabot’s education programs promote STEM literacy skills needed for a 21st-century society and workforce.

  • dan.b

    no what are we animals ill get my protein and such from other things.

    • Aaron lam

      i agree from other meats

  • aj

    I wouldn’t eat insect at all because it is just nasty period.

  • Ezra Quianzon

    I do not think I can eat insects at all. I’m not comfortable with insects dead or alive so I don’t think eating them wouldn’t make a difference on how i feel.

  • Preston Chu

    If I didn’t have a choice, I would eat insects. I’ve eaten them in foreign countries before and they pretty much taste like other foods (whether it be chicken or crab).

  • May N.

    I wouldn’t eat insects because just the thought of it sounds disgusting to me. I can barely handle seeing them and being near them, I can’t imagine eating them.

  • Erica Liang

    I would eat insects if they pose no threat to my health. I heard that they’re actually very nutritious and some are high in protein. I’ve eaten cricket when I was in China and it wasn’t as bad as I thought it’d be. I know that a lot of people think it’s gross, but people in various countries include insects in their diets. What we include in our diets might even be considered abnormal to them.

  • Darren H.

    I would be okay with eating certain insects, because I am sure that after I get used to eating something that I absolutely hate, I should be fine. However I would be patient and wait for regulations to come out first, or if I see them in the grocery market.

  • Chelsea

    I would never eat insects because it doesn’t seem very logical. When you think of a bug or a spider, most people get frighten or shocked of the insect. How could you ever possibly eat them. Insects have been everywhere, and it isn’t very sanitary to eat them no matter how much someone tries to clean it or cook them. Although, it is said that insects can be healthier for you it’s frightening to think of eating a creature we tend to kill constantly.

  • Ada Ouyang

    I think I would try eating insects but not as a diet. I would do that because I know that some insects are nutritious and high in protein, but I feel that if I eat them as part of my diet, I don’t know if I will be able to get used to it.

  • Libby Chuong

    No I would not because I don’t like insects even though it may be good for you.

  • Terri Tu

    I would eat insects because it’s really good and healthy, full of protein and less calories. This one time I went to Hong Kong and there was a restaurant that had cockroaches and I had tried it out, it was pretty crunchy but tasted so weird, I didn’t noticed it was a cockroach I though it was some beef.

  • SL

    Yes, IT TASTE HELLA GOOD. I LOVE IT SO MUCH

  • QiSheng Zhu

    I wouldn’t eat insects because whenever I think of consuming juicy insects I feel sick in my stomach.

  • Dennis Le

    I pray to god that I never eat bugs.

    Our Father, Who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy Kingdom come, Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

  • Lizzy Yoo

    I personally enjoy eating insects and eating insects is part of my country’s tradition. Korean eat the steamed and seasoned chrysalis as a daily snack. It tastes good and healthy. If people can get rid of the prejudice against eating bugs, it tastes same as other meet the market usually provides but more healthier.

  • Yahya Yusuf

    I personally think that it would be really cool to eat insects. They’re packed with protein and nutrition. They have more protein and nutrition then a cow ever would be able to supply you. They wouldn’t take too much space and don’t need as much food as other domestic animals would.

    • Bernhardt_MHS

      I agree, there are a lot of benefits to eating insects! Not only nutritional but economically. Farming insects costs much less than farming cattle and meat processing. Not only are bugs healthier but they’re the economically right decision for everyone.
      #APESwithHUTH
      #DoNowInsects
      #BugsBeforeBeef

    • Surratt_MHS

      I agree with you. The benefits that come from eating insects outweigh the costs by far. The only reason that anyone can find not to eat insects is that it’s gross to them. Insects have many nutritional values and are more sustainable. Eating more insects would be more nutritional, less expensive, and safer for the environment. There is no reason not to eat them!

      #APESwithHuth

      #DoNowInsects

      #Blindedbytheickfactor

      Bryant, Charles W. “Benefits of Eating Bugs.” How Stuff Works?. Web. 21 May 2015. .

    • Key_MHS

      Exactly! Bugs could be the new way to end hunger. If people would eat them, they would be healthier, stronger, and it would also help some cultures adapt into others. I truly wish people did not find eating bugs to be gross. I for one would eat then if they tasted half decent and were cooked. The more bugs humans eat, the better we could be off.

      #APESWITHHUTH
      #DoNowInsects
      #eatDEMbugs

      Bryant, Charles W. “Benefits of Eating Bugs.” How Stuff Works?. Web. 21 May 2015. .

    • Grise_MHS

      I agree. I think that people make a bigger deal out of insects than it really should be. It might seem gross, but when it really comes down to it, insects are a healthy and cheap option for humans as far as nutrition.

      #APESwithHuth
      #DoNowInsects

      Bryant, Charles W. “Benefits of Eating Bugs.” How Stuff Works?. Web. 21 May 2015. .

    • nick S

      I see why.. But super gross thinking about chewing on little insects every day.

  • It would take me some time to warm up to eating insects, but after I got past the initial shock factor, I think I could learn to enjoy it. I don’t think I would ever want it to become a significant aspect of my diet, but I’m not against at least trying it. It is a protein rich source of food that we may need to sustain ourselves in the future.

  • Rosbitt BDP

    Would you eat insects as part of a sustainable, earth-friendly diet?

    Yes I would and i’ve already tried the joke version. If you go to the zoo I can assure you will find Larvets a snack that are dried worms that have BBQ flavoring over the top. They are almost just like the crumbs at the bottom of your crisps. So yes I will try them again.

  • Victor Herrera

    I personally would eat bugs because they are a lot healthier and better for the environment then beef . It is a great source of protein . They dont take the space that it does to produce beef.

  • Rosbitt BDP

    Would you eat insects as part of a sustainable, earth-friendly diet?

    Yes I would and i’ve already tried the joke version. If you go to the zoo I can assure you will find Larvets a snack that are dried worms that have BBQ flavoring over the top. They are almost just like the crumbs at the bottom of your crisps. So yes I will try them again!

    • Henderson_MHS

      Once you get pass the notion that insects are gross and nasty, you’ll find out they don’t taste that bad after all, I have tried eating an grasshopper before, it taste it alright, but I don’t think I can eat insects now, I just got use to eating chickens, pork, beef, ham and turkey, so its hard for me to readjust, but eating insects is better for the environment. They take less resources to raise and they contain more nutrients than the meats I mentioned early. So as long as I don’t know it, I think I’ll be fine, because eating insects is more beneficial to the environment.

      #APESwithHuth

      #DoNowInsects

  • Frannie

    I understand that insects have great nutritional value and that a lot of countries already consume bugs on a daily basis, but personally I could never see myself indulging in a plate of roasted crickets. If it ever got to the point that animals couldn’t survive I would have an open mind and Humans could obviously survive off of insects, but I don’t think I would ever eat them unless I was totally forced to. That being said, I don’t find the countries or people who do enjoy them gross or disgusting, we are all entitled to our own form of delicacies.

    • Lopez_MHS

      I am the same way. I researched the health benefits of eating insects is and they are actually very healthy. But I could definitely not pick up a cricket, put some salt on it, and eat it. We used to eat insects all the time and we were much taller and healthier.

      #APESWITHHUTH
      #DoNowInsects
      #TheOldDays

      1. “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.
      2. Martin, Daniella. “The Benefits of Eating Bugs.” The Week. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

  • Jack Boomer

    Bugs are gross! And I hate them! When I see a bug in my house, I kill it, not eat it. I’m not going to eat something that u want to kill when I see it. Maybe if bugs looked like cows, I would be tempted to eat them, but they do not. I am a picky eater, personally. I don’t even eat lettuce because it looks like leaves. And people think I would eat bugs. No! They’re gross and really sketchy. I feel like they were crawling inside of me. Steak doesn’t crawl so I’m not really worried about that. In conclusion, Bugs are gross!

    https://edibug.wordpress.com/why-eat-bugs-2/ http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2015/02/06/this-college-student-is-eating-bugs-for-30-days-so-you-will-too/

  • Matthew Krump

    To be honest, bugs probably don’t taste that bad. I could get by with eating bugs, given the courtesy that I didn’t know it was a bug, or if it were to impress a girl. That’s the only way. They probably don’t taste too bad, and there’s probably a lot of nutrition and protein in bugs. It sounds like mass producing bugs for meals would help the world out agriculturally and economically. So if we can get past the “ick factor”, it may be a really good option.

  • anthony palmer

    I would eat bugs if it was a necessary. I think its awesome they are full of protein and could be a substitute for meat. I bet after you get over the psychological aspect the bugs would be pretty tasty. I am not against trying food, but if looks gross or slimy i can’t do it. I would be scared though that the it could be unsanitary or the bug would lay eggs in me. I would probably eat bugs as a sustainable food option. https://edibug.wordpress.com/why-eat-bugs-2/

  • carlos a

    Honestly I probably wouldn’t eat bugs unless it was the last option. But If it came to it I probably wouldn’t have a problem eating them. I do think if I was to try them I might actually enjoy them.

  • Kleiber Marroquin Sarceno

    I was hesitant at the idea to start eating insects at first, but i got to say, i never knew that insects had that much protein and nutrients. That made me reconsider at the idea and maybe it wouldn’t be too bad of a price to pay for the drought. #DoNow1

    • ValerieG

      I agree! The idea made me feel hesitant as well but it would actually help our planet.

  • Barajas_MHS

    Insects require a small portion of water to be raised and provide humans with the same amounts of protein or even more than other protein sources such as beef. Insects are already part of our diet without us even knowing about it. They are found in chocolate, peanut butter, macaroni and noodle products, popcorn, and other canned products. The FDA allows a certain amount of insect fragments in our food, we already consume fragmented insects, so why not try them whole? An insect based diet can provide us with protein, save water, and help the environment by reducing methane, and carbon dioxide emissions. Nearly 80 percent of the world already eats insects so this idea can be popularized. #APESwithHuth #DoNowInsects #bugalicious

    “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

  • smaktcat

    Ive actually used cricket “flour ” to up the protien in my home made pumpkin-granola bars, not weird or ikky . But not ready for anything i can actually see the “buggieness” of whatever i am eating;)

  • Lopez_MHS

    Although eating bugs appears to be healthy I do not think I could push myself to eat a bug. If you look in the past, our early human ancestors were more physically capable than the modern population. They averaged a height of 6 foot 5 inches, had stronger bones, had more robust immune systems, were leaner, tougher, and hardier. This was due to their “Paleo Diet” of wild game meat, gathered greens and fruits, and healthy fats such as nuts. You also have to factor in the higher level of physical activity but there seems to be a direct correlation to the physical wellbeing of these people and their diet. This is mainly because bugs are a much higher quality food than the beef or “salad” that we eat today. Insects are a trophic level two food source, they have eaten and have the nutrients of plants in their tissues. This provides us with protein, iron, calcium, and healthy unsaturated long-chain essential fatty acids. Yes you can just eat the plants that they are eating but you will have to eat a lot of them. The nutrients are concentrated in high amounts in these insects making it easier and more efficient to eat the insects and also get the necessary nutrients for survival. Could you push yourself to eat these nutritious creatures?

    #APESWITHHUTH
    #DoNowInsects
    #TheOldDays

    1. “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.
    2. Martin, Daniella. “The Benefits of Eating Bugs.” The Week. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

  • Alex Y.

    Although eating insects would be beneficial to our environment and bodies, it may be difficult for people to open their minds enough to include insects into their diets.

  • Evan Siegel

    I would eat insects because there a good source of food and nutrition and they could also help solve the world hunger problem in the world.

    • Elliot Barnes

      yes i agree

  • Elliot Barnes

    i would eat insects because they have a great source of protein(almost 20g more than salmon and beef) in them and by eating them the infographic resource said that the carbon dioxide levels would drop and the amount of water consumed would be dropped as well so essential its saying by eating insects we would not only be eating healthy but also solving other world problems

  • ValerieG

    Personally, at first the idea of eating insects made me a bit squeamish but after learning that 80% of the population eats insects as a part of their normal diet, I figured it couldn’t be too bad. If so many people enjoy eating insects already and it is statistically shown to help our planet, then those who wish to include insects in their diets should be able to. Our society should ensure the food is safe to eat and then it should not be a problem. #DoNow1

    • Shaniya Turner

      I agree with you when you said society needs to ensure that the insects are safe to eat in food. I just refuse to eat insects, but I’m not against others eating them. The only thing that worries me is that an article I read stated that the over eating of insects could lead to a collapse in insect populations. This may not be that big of a deal since the insect population is so diverse, but one day it could be a problem. As long as the rest of us who don’t want to eat bugs are still allowed to get our protein from animals then I’m fine with it. #IllKeepTheSteak #APESWITHHUTH #DoNowInsects
      -Ferris, Robert. “PROFESSOR: Here’s Why Insects Won’t Solve World Hunger.” Business Insider. Business Insider, Inc, 18 May 2013. Web. 21 May 2015. .

    • Glendenning_MHS

      I completely agree! With majority of the world already eating insects, it shouldn’t seem so gross. Insects would help ensure food as they only need 1 gallon of water to raise 1 pound of insects compared to the 999 gallons to raise just one pound of cow. This would help solve the lack of water problem in drought areas like California. Also, we already eat insects whether we know it or not in part like up to 300 insects parts are allowed in a gram of cinnamon so eating them shouldn’t really seem gross.

      #APESwithHuth

      #DoNowInsects

      #Insectsalltheway

      “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 May 2015.

  • Blocher_MHS

    There clearly has to be some sort of change in our diets. The amount of arable land in hectares per person has decreased in just about every country from 1980 to 2014. Insects are extremely efficient, as said by the article, and can take up very small room or even be raised in existing livestock areas. Their high nutrition also rivals that of meat, and will likely be healthier for us than most kinds of red meat. Insects are already allowed in the food we eat, so we know that insects aren’t dangerous. The real problem here is that we find bugs gross. We kill them, not eat them. I personally would be open to gradually eating bugs. I couldn’t eat them outright, but I would be ok with using them as a kind of flour. If the bugs, such as crickets, are ground up like flour and baked into foods, I would be more willing to try it. I think a gradual acceptance of eating bugs, like starting with the flour and graduating to more and more parts of insects, will get people interested and welcome them to eating foods. Would you be willing to slowly eat more and more insects?

    #InsectAcceptance

    #APESWITHHUTH

    #Donowinsects

    “Arable Land (hectares per Person).” Arable Land (hectares per Person). N.p., n.d. Web. 18 May 2015. .

  • Dr. Aaron T. Dossey

    The best way to try insects is incorporating a high quality insect powder (made from farm raised insects) into a recipe of one of your favorite foods. Here’s a place where you can get very good cricket powder / cricket flour ( All Things Bugs LLC ) :

    https://www.allthingsbugs.com/product/finely-milled-whole-cricket-powder/

  • Chris

    Yes,I would.I’ve already tried numerous insects,and even noticed the protein benefit from some larger ones,like giant centipedes.And I find the idea a whole lot more sustainable concerning our planet than veganism,as insects are already a staple food in so many countries all over the World.

  • Jennings_MHS

    I think that if it was completely necessary for sustainable life on earth I could make insects a part of my diet. However I don’t know if I could completely replace all meats in my diet with bugs and insects. And I think that we can look and draw from what we have done in the past with things like lobster and shrimp. People saw them similar to the way we see insects today. and if we look back even farther to our ancestors who survived on things they could find ( including insects), they were on average bigger and stronger than we are today. So there seems to be a variety of health benefits from eating insects. Also, since farming insects is much more ecologically friendly this could very well be a way we could help solve world hunger. Places with very little water would be able to produce more food from harvesting insects rather than beef.

    What would it take for you to eat insects?

    #APESWITHHUTH

    #Donowinsects

    Martin, Daniella. “The benefits of eating bugs.” The week . 1 Mar. 2014. Web. 18 May 2015. .

  • RZ3BABY_MHS

    I do not think I could bring myself to start consuming bugs/insects for a sustainable source of nutrition. I can recognize the potential benefits of the adoption of insects and bugs into our diet, however, I believe because of psychological reasons that American’s as a whole will never except the consumption of things like meal worms and crickets into mainstream diets. The safety question is another reason why I believe that this idea will never see the light of day. If you want to convince such a large amount of people to change their diets to something they have feared consuming since they were a child there needs to be an almost certain guarantee that the source is safe.

    How safe is it for Americans to consume large amounts of insects?

    #ThatsNasty

    #APESWITHHUTH

    #Donowinsects

  • Costa_MHS

    It is quite obvious that in the near future the world will be unable to produce enough meat to sustain the human population. A sort of taboo idea called entomophagy is the eating of bugs in various forms. This alternative form of food could be extremely beneficial to the earth. Insects multiply rapidly making them more renewable. Certain types of insects can also be nutritious as mentioned in the article. Many people are concerned about health risks of eating insects because it is not widely done, but insects are already allowed in the food we eat. According to he U.S. Food and Drug Administration, an average of thirty or more insect fragments per ten grams of food. I personally think that I would eat insects if they tasted good. Just like other regular food, there would some I would refuse to eat based on taste, appearance, etc. So depending on how they were prepared I would eat them. I would not be opposed to them being used in flour or other products like that. I think that the main reason people do not want to eat bugs is because they think they are “gross”. So in order to make this a more widely used food choice, then it needs to be more socially accepted.

    How can we make the practice of eating insects more acceptable?

    #APESWITHHUTH

    #DoNowInsects

    “U.S. Food and Drug Administration.” Defect Levels Handbook. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 May 2015.

  • lizzy_mhs

    Honestly the bugs aren’t that bad from a slight perspective. Bugs provide great protein source, and are cooked similarly to normal foods. Of course there are going to be people who disagree with the idea. Also being mindful, for some locations bugs may be their only choice. All choices will obviously vary with this topic. Although if it was the last source, I think we’d all give in. Personally I wouldn’t, but if it was the ONLY thing left…… Yeah.

    #APESwithHuth

    #DoNowDrought

    McCafferty, Keith. “Eating Insects For Survival.” Field & Stream. Field & Stream, 04 Aug. 2011. Web. 18 May 2015.

    • Jacobs_MHS

      I also don’ think I could see myself eating bugs. When we eat cows we don’t eat their cute little eyes or anything. So why would we eat whole bugs?

      #Itsnotdonowdroughtanymorelizzy
      #getwiththeprogramgirl

  • Blizard_MHS

    Although there should be a change in the way we eat in America, I don’t believe that humans should be swayed to the idea that eating bugs is the only way to do so. It can not be proven that eating bugs are safe to eat, even though they may be healthy. The chance that bugs can be carrying diseases or be contaminated with pesticides, is a high chance that people are not looking for when eating bugs. Most people who make bugs, get them shipped alive then kill them themselves, allowing them to be contaminated during delivery process. Also, you must consider the differing nutritional values between each source of meat. In the video above, it explains how bugs only have 1 gram more of protein than pigs, and pigs are the more widely excepted of the two.

    Are you willing to change your ethical stance for a better diet?

    @KQEDedspace

    #APESWITHHUTH

    #DONOWINSECTS

    “For and against Eating Insects – Would You Dine on Bugs?” Which? Conversation. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 May 2015.

    • Blocher_MHS

      Not only can it be proven that bugs are safe to eat, it has been proven and is allowed. I have attached a list that some people might want to see that includes the amount of insect parts, rodent hairs and parasites that are allowed in foods. I think it’s actually pretty impressive that such a small animal packs more protein than a pig. As to the question, my ethical stance doesn’t change whether I eat bugs or not, it’s just that I hold the same stereotype that a lot of people do in that I think bugs are nasty to eat.

      #APESWITHHUTH

      #Donowinsects

      #InsectAcceptance

      http://www.sixwise.com/newsletters/05/06/29/how_many_insect_parts_and_rodent_hairs_are_allowed_in_your_food.htm/

      “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food? N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2015. .

      • Blizard_MHS

        After going back and reading your initial post, I see that your main concern if we don’t eat bugs is the diets and nutrition in our country. I think some of the students that agree with this statement aren’t looking at the big picture of what people consider “nutritional value”. Fast food is a continuing rising industry where people can get food quick for a low price. McDonalds, Burger King, Cookout, these are the culprits of poor diet in our country, not red meat and poultry. I will admit, it is amazing that such a small creature contains so much protein, but because of moral standings, I believe eating insects can be a last resort when searching for a better nutrition diet. Its not that we lack food high in nutritional value, it’s that we lack those willing to eat it. I am not against those in favor of consuming insects, I only wish that they look at the bigger picture that is causing people in our country to search for more “nutrition”, when it has been right in front of them all along.

        #APESWITHHUTH
        #DONOWINSECTS
        #Dowenotseetheobvious

    • lizzy_mhs

      Very good point, there are many alternatives besides eating insects. Other option such as plants could seem more reasonable, we already eat plants. Dandelions are relish, and packed with vitamin C, and A. Also changing the way we eat is very key in America.
      #APESWITHHUTH
      #DONOWINSECTS
      #Dandydelish
      “52 Wild Plants You Can Eat – Updated – Waking Times.” Waking Times. N.p., 03 Aug. 2013. Web. 29 May 2015.

  • Henderson_MHS

    Even though there is scientific evidence that some edible insects are more nutritious for us than chicken, beef or ham, I don’t think I can eat those edible insects. I can eat shrimp, lobsters, and crabs, which some people called insects, but they are crustaceans, which is very close to insects, both in the Arthropod group. In this article, it talks about it less water to raise the same weight of insect than livestocks, for example it take one gallon of water to raise one pound of crickets, and it take 2,500 gallon of water to raise one pound of beef. So, if we switch our diets to insects, we can not only save water usage but also increase nutrient intake. Many insects are rich in protein, good fat, and high in calcium, iron and zinc. Insects are the most abundant organism in the world, there already over 2 billion people who are practicing this kind of culture. Insects are plentiful for people to eat, and easy to catch and raise. Wether you like it or not, if our population increase like we expected, reach 9 billion people in 2050, we will be running out of meat, so what will be our next food source?

    Judging that, insect doesn’t seem that bad for us to eat right?

    #APESwithHuth
    #Donowinsects
    #EdibleFood?

    “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

    Edible Insects: Finger Lickin’ Grub. Dir. Sheraz Sadiq. 24 Apr. 2012. KQEDeducation. Web. 18 May 2015. .

  • Emily M

    Do you really want something that eats houses in your body? Didn’t think so. #dontdonow

  • Bodine_mhs

    I would prefer not to eat bugs if I can help it. There is scientific evidence that insects are more nutritious for us than chicken, beef, or even ham. If it comes to the point where I have to eat insects, then I will, but I would prefer not to. Raising insects is more sustainable and eco friendly than raising other crops or animals. The article states that it takes one gallon of water to raise one pound of crickets, yet it takes 2,500 gallons to raise on pound of beef. Insects also emit less waste than other animals. Most insects are rich in protein, good fat, high in calcium, iron and zinc. Insects are a popular dish for over two billion people already, so why can’t we? WE are going to run out of meat, why not eat them?

    Would you rather starve or eat insects?

    #APESWITHHUTH

    #DoNowInsects

    #crunch&munch

    “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

    Edible Insects: Finger Lickin’ Grub. Dir. Sheraz Sadiq. 24 Apr. 2012. KQEDeducation. Web. 18 May 2015. .

    • Tang_MHS

      I agree, if there’s no other choice in life, I would end up eating insects. Even though I really really do not want to since I think that they are disgusting or maybe it’s just the fact that I am just not used to eating it as a daily routine. Eating insects can benefit both the ecosystem and our human body health. For our ecosystems, like you/article said, saves gallons of water. For us, it’s great proteins, good fat and high calcium. In my opinion, (if I had to) I would eat insects instead of just sitting there starving.

      #InsectsOrNah
      #APESWITHHUTH
      #DoNowInsects

  • Shaniya Turner

    I would not eat insects. The article stated that 80% of the nation already eat insects, and the video stated that a cow need 1,000 gallons of water to produce 1 pound of meat while insects need only 1 gallon of water for the same amount of protein. This is great but it’s hard to think about the environmental benefit when you can’t get past the idea of eating a bug. It’s a big difference in eating a cricket and eating a piece of steak. Some people can tolerate the taste of insects so I do think that insects should be marketed more for the people who are okay with eating them. Even if not everyone incorporates insects into their diet, the people that are and will in the future will be benefiting our environment. I think everyone plays their own part in creating a sustainable environment, some may recycle and use water saving techniques while others may give up meat all together for bugs. I don’t think it matters what we all decide, as long as we are all doing something to help the environment.
    -Is the 80% of the nation already eating insects not enough?
    #IllKeepTheSteak
    #DoNowInsects
    #APESWITHHUTH
    “Incredible, Edible Bugs: Will Meals of Mealworms Catch on in U.S.?” PBS. PBS, n.d. Web. 19 May 2015. .

    • Blizard_MHS

      I completely agree with you. Although no one notices, insects play an important role in the ecosystem and upsetting this would be unethical because it would hurt the environment. Insects are a base in the food chain for most meat eaters, certain insects provide a role where they sustain their environment. As eating insects, we have not taken into consideration how the drop in number of insects will effect the ecosystem. Because of this, eating insects should be a last resort in food shortage situations.

      #APESWITHHUTH
      #DONOWINSECTS
      #CravingSteakNow

      • Shaniya Turner

        Completely agree with you on it being unethical. Most people probably won’t think of the effects eating insects will have on the species. Sorry for making you crave steak btw.

    • Lynch_MHS

      This is a valid point. I understand that some people don’t like the taste and thats fine! However, I think we just need to start accepting them more in our diets and not judging people for eating them. I agree that everyone should do something for the environment and totally get it if people don’t want to eat insects. We just need to be more tolerable of them in our diets. However, I don’t agree that putting percentages is the right approach. Everyone should try it even if a large percentages already have. It could help the environment and result in a cheaper food source for the individual.
      #nastybutnutritious
      @KQEDedspace
      #APESWITHHUTH
      #DoNowInsects

      “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

      Edible Insects: Finger Lickin’ Grub. Dir. Sheraz Sadiq. 24 Apr. 2012. KQEDeducation. Web. 18 May 2015. .

      McCafferty, Keith. “Eating Insects For Survival.” Field & Stream. Field & Stream, 04 Aug. 2011. Web. 18 May 2015.

  • Gray_MHS

    Science has proven that the only reason to not eat bugs is the fact that we find it gross. I personally would not choose to eat insects but, I feel that if I were in a position where it was the only option I would possibly eat insects. Scientists say that the only reason we decide to not eat insects is because we find it gross, and I agree with that. I find bugs to be gross and would not want to be in contact with them, especially if they are being put into my mouth. I don’t feel that I would able to eat an insect knowing that I could be eating a food I am more familiar with. I do feel however that if I were in a position, such as living in an area where certain foods are not available, I would probably bring myself to eating insects. Although I am pretty set in my ways about not eating them, I do have to think that the FDA already allows a certain amount of bugs in foods. We have been eating bugs all of our lives and we will continue to, to some extent even if you don’t openly choose to stuff a cricket in your mouth.

    #APESwithHuth

    #DoNowInsects

    #Nothanks

    Hill, Kyle. “Don’t Bug Out, but Your Food Is Covered in Insects.” Saloncom RSS. N.p., 5 June 2013. Web. 18 May 2015.

    http://www.salon.com/2013/06/05/your_breakfast_of_champions_includes_bugs_partner/

    • McLelland_MHS

      I understand that we may not want to eat bugs but I’m afraid thats what may happen. We can’t run away from the outcomes of our growth and I believe we may have to start adding bugs as a natural part of our diets. If we are able to add the bugs to our diets it will save huge amounts of water and may relieve some of our water consumption problems. Also it may not be that bad, as we can see its already been brought to deli cases around the world. Bugs may in fact be a nutrias and green answer to the future.

      “Would You Eat Insects?” KQED Education KQED Public Media for Northern CA. Web. 28 May 2015.

      #APESwithHuth
      #DoNowInsects
      #BugsLifes2

  • Tang_MHS

    I would eat insects IF I didn’t have any other choice because that’ll be my only option left and from the article, it even says that it is high in protein, low in fat, loaded with vitamins and 80% of the global population are eating it as their normal diet. In my opinion, it seems like entomophagy is not even bad, as long as it is safe to eat and that you won’t end up getting diseases from it. The FDA researches shows that an average person unintentionally eats a pound of insects every year. I think that the thought of just looking at and touching it with your bare hands is probably one of the many reasons why people think that eating insects is just nasty and gross. I for one would not eat insects as part of my “earth friendly diet.” To persuade people in the future to eating insects as their diet, I think it’ll be best if you were to combine it with other items as well… Like for example, snails in France is cooked with garlic and it would just taste like garlic… literally.
    How can we persuade others that insects provides good nutrients for you?

    #InsectsOrNah
    #APESWITHHUTH
    #DoNowInsects

    “Behind The Scenes At Graveyard Point.” Rodale’s Organic Life. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 May 2015. .

    Edible Insects: Finger Lickin’ Grub. Dir. Sheraz Sadiq. 24 Apr. 2012. KQEDeducation. Web. 19 May 2015. .

    • Lynch_MHS

      I agree that combination and mixing them into our diet is the best way to generate acceptance of insects in our diet. As to the fact about the FDA, I honestly don’t mind eating insects if they are intentionally in my food. I would rather eat a meal that I knew had insects in it than one I had no idea. If it is not in the recipe, it shouldn’t be in the meal. The one pound scares me because I feel that if the insects are in our everyday food, they might contain diseases. Also, this fact I was unaware of leads me to believe that there is non-safe items in our food and that the industry can’t keep unwanted ingredients out.
      We need to start incorporating the insects into our food because of all the health facts you listed! We just might need to warm up to the idea first.
      #nastybutnutritious
      @KQEDedspace
      #APESWITHHUTH
      #DoNowInsects

      “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

      Edible Insects: Finger Lickin’ Grub. Dir. Sheraz Sadiq. 24 Apr. 2012. KQEDeducation. Web. 18 May 2015. .

      McCafferty, Keith. “Eating Insects For Survival.” Field & Stream. Field & Stream, 04 Aug. 2011. Web. 18 May 2015.

  • DJohnson_MHS

    A good thing about insects is that they do not take up a lot of water or space to harvest them. Beef on the other hand takes up a giant amount of water to raise. We can find insects in our food already and the FDA allows this. Even though we do not know this it is true. They are found in chocolate, Peanut butter, noodle products, and other canned products. Insects are a good source of protein and can help save water. This can in turn help out with the water crisis that is happening in California. We are already eating parts of insects, so why don’t we step up and try eating whole insects?

    #APESWithHuth

    #DoNowInsects

    #GotInsects

    “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

    • Jennings_MHS

      I agree, trace amounts of insects are already in the food that we eat so why should eating them on purpose be much different. That along with how much water and land is saved by farming insects rather than larger animals makes eating bugs seem like a possible option to feed every one.

      #APESWithHuth

      #DoNowInsects

      “Arable Land (hectares per Person).” Arable Land (hectares per Person). N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2015. .

  • Chandler_MHS

    Bugs really are not bad to eat at all. They’re actually really good. There is not one drawback to eating bugs. As the video states about eating bugs, the edible ones have more protein than even meat, and half the fat. Some have twice the vitamins as meat does as well. If that isn’t enough, they require 999 gallons of water less per pound to raise. This would be a critical help to California in the process of conserving water in its horrible drought after four long years, as stated in the article. To go further, edible insects have no chance of transmitting diseases since they are very genetically different from humans. Economically, physically, and socially, bugs are a huge bargain. They only drawback is psychologic. People aren’t really fond of even being around bugs. Most people would love to kill them, or just stay away from them. The fact that one would actually eat a bug is repulsive to others. We need to get past this psychological barrier somehow, someway. If we do this, we will understand just how beneficial bugs truly can be.

    What can we do to get past the psychological barrier of thinking bugs are disgusting and not fit to eat?

    #BugsAreLife

    “Edible Insects: Finger Lickin’ Grub.” YouTube. Web. 20 May 2015. .

  • Jacobs_MHS

    Bugs really disgust me. I don’t think I could see myself eating them at all. I am not trying to be ignorant and be not open to change, But when we eat meats it isn’t like we are eating the whole thing. We are just seeing the meat part of them. So the question would remain if I would eat insects. Maybe if they took all the creepy little legs off or something. They would also probably have to bread it. Just like people are saying we eat them all the time, But we don’t know we are actually eating them. If I wasn’t aware I was eating bugs I am sure I would be fine. It is good that they support sustainability because they account for more protein and need less water to “harvest”. Economically Bugs are good for us to eat.

    #APESwithHuth

    #DoNowInsects

    #CanIHaveALargeMcTarantulaWithASideOfFries

  • Surratt_MHS

    I personally do not think that I could bring myself to eat insects as part of a sustainable, earth-friendly diet. It’s not that this would be too grub for me, if I lived in an area where this was more acceptable to eat insects as a part of a typical diet, I most likely would. However, where I live this is considered very strange and gross, so I do not think that I could bring myself to do it. I do understand the argument behind it however. I realize that insects can be very nutritional and are more environmentally friendly to raise and produce. Insects were also eaten for several centuries by our ancestors in the past, just because the fad died away does not mean there is anything wrong with consuming insects for food or that it is disgusting. Insects are still eaten by more than 80% of the world’s population and I can understand it. Just because I personally do not live in an area where it is socially unacceptable to eat insects, does not mean that I am completely turned off to the idea. There are some changes that I would be willing to make to my diet, such as eating more fruits and vegetables than meat, but I am not sure that that eating insects as a part of my diet would be one of them. What reasoning is there behind not eating insects other than it is is “icky” and socially unacceptable?

    #blindedbytheickfactor

    #donowinsects

    #APESwithHuth

    #KQEDDONOW

    “Would You Eat Insects?.” KQED Education. 12 May 2015. Web. 21 May 2015.

    Bryant, Charles W. “Benefits of Eating Bugs.” How Stuff Works?. Web. 21 May 2015. .

  • Key_MHS

    I do not find the eating of bugs as a big deal. I believe that if you cook them right and make them tasty then nobody should have an issue with eating them. Bugs require less water and nutrients to support them and get them to the stage for people to eat them. This could fix many issues concerning economics and health of the world because they contain more protein and less fat then the animals we eat now such as cows. It will also make food prices drop super low and let more people stay away from hunger.

    #APESwithHuth
    #DoNowInsects
    #grubDEMbugs

    “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

  • Doolen_MHS

    Personally, I would not eat bugs. They are healthy and I think that developing countries should invest in bug farms because they are high in protein and are cheaper. I think that eating insects is an easy way to solve a food shortage issue. However, I personally would not be able to get over the fact that insects crunch in your month or crawl around on the ground. Insects however are an easy way to solve a hunger issue. They are easy to produce reducing land use, water use and time. Can you put aside thought of eating insects to become more healthy and save money?

    #APESWITHHUTH

    #savemoneyeatinsects

    #DoNowInsects

    “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

    “Would You Eat Insects?.” KQED Education. 12 May 2015. Web. 21 May 2015.

  • Glendenning_MHS

    Honestly if the insects were properly prepared, I don’t see anything wrong with eating them. Already 80% of the world does it anyways, so why not us. We are already eating insects even if we don’t now, for example for every gram of cinnamon there up to 300 parts of insects. Eating insects would also be part of the answer for drought areas like California as to produce a pound of insects only takes 1 gallon compared to 999 gallons it takes to produce 1 pound of beef. This would help California reduce their water use in their 4 year long drought. Also Economically, this would be great as insects do not require a lot of water or land to produce making them cheaper for the consumer. Plus insects do not carry diseases, unlike cows, to could make us ill. Insects provide more protein, less fat, and vitamins compared to cows which make insects ideal for us. If people could stop labeling insects as gross, I think with so many benefits insects could become part of everyones diet. How can we stop and get past labeling insects as gross and inedible?

    #APESwithHuth

    #DoNowInsects

    #Insectsalltheway

    “What Defects the FDA Allows in 11 Types of Food.” Mental Floss. N.p., 1 Nov. 2011. Web. 21 May 2015.

  • Parker_MHS

    I really hope that California, agriculture powerhouse, gets this drought under control so we do not have to resort to eating insects. However, eating insects would take a considerably less amount of time, energy, and effort than eating livestock. 2,500 gallons less, to be exact. Eating insects would also help reduce the United States’ greenhouse gas emissions. According to the EPA, 9% of the United States’ total greenhouse gas emission is allocated to agriculture, and cultivating livestock from cradle to grave. That is a 17% increase in greenhouse gas emissions since 1990. Part of this increase is due to the 54% growth in combined CH4 and N2O emissions form livestock manure management systems. So maybe eating insects is not such a bad idea. Is the process of harvesting and eating insects an unreasonable, short term, solution to rampant global warming and lack of proper water allocation?

    #DoNowInsects

    #LiveLongAndProsper

    #ApeswithHuth

    “Agriculture.” EPA. Environmental Protection Agency, n.d. Web. 22 May 2015.

  • Maguire_mhs

    At first it seems gross to think about eating bugs but after researching the topic there are many health benefits from it. I don’t think I would ever eat a living, uncooked bug but if it was cooked and seasoned I would probably eat them. I think it would be hard to eat them on a regular basis because it is taboo. Although how did humans decide what animals to eat and not eat? Insects fragments and parts are already allowed in some of our foods so people might be eating them and they don’t even know it. The only downside to eating bugs could be the possible spread of diseases but other than that they have nutritional value and have higher protein than most meats.

    “U.S. Food and Drug Administration.” Defect Levels Handbook. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 May 2015.

  • Crowel_MHS

    Generally, the people of the United States, informally known as America, are against change, whether it be social, political, or in this case dietary practices. Insects. A nutritious, yet seemingly gross, class of organisms that not only hold more protein per ounce than red meats, but also consume a minute fraction of the water. I propose that these Americans resistant to change reexamine this sustainable option and make themselves willing to change their own lifestyle, for the betterment of all others. I fully support and endorse the lifestyle of insect intake, as it may be essential for our future survival as a modern society.

    What will it take to convince the world about bugs?

    #BugBaklava

    #donowinsects

    #APESwithHuth

    #KQEDDONOW

    “Liberal Self-Identification Edges Up to New High in 2013.” Gallup Poles. Web. 22 May 2015.

    “Would You Eat Insects?.” KQED Education. 12 May 2015. Web. 21 May 2015.

    • Chandler_MHS

      I agree 100%. Bugs are definitely a way to go if things get worse with water management. There are no drawbacks of eating bugs. I would eat bugs in the future if I had to, and so should everyone else. People need to get used to eating bugs, especially if it is essential to survival in the future if water reserves get extremely low.

      #BugsAreLife

      “Benefits of Eating Bugs.” HowStuffWorks. Web. 28 May 2015. .

  • Carberry_MHS

    I would be lying if I said that when I saw this article I wasn’t skeptical. The thought of eating bugs to me and to a lot of other people is far from appetizing. However, that reasoning is only a psychological barrier. The benefits of incorporating insects in our diets would prove to be a positive change in a number of ways. If you consider eating insects from an ecological, economic, and global perspective, the benefits begin to outweigh any reservations one might have. “A United Nations report found that the livestock industry is responsible for generating more greenhouse gas emissions than transport.” This means that people’s consumption of livestock is worse for the environment than our cars. The consumption of livestock is continuing to grow as third world countries are developing. Not only does is this growth bad for the environment, but it is simply not an unsustainable practice. Bugs are nutritious, more efficient in producing protein, less likely to transfer diseases, inexpensive, much more environmentally friendly, and considered a delicacy in many cultures. With as many people currently eating and enjoying insects as there are, it can’t be that bad. We just have to be open minded.

    80% of the world’s cultures already eat insects as part of their diets, why can’t we?

    #donowinsects

    #APESwithHuth

    #Beopenminded

    1. “Why Eat Bugs?” Girl Meets Bug. 09 Jan. 2010. Web. 22 May 2015. .

  • Grise_MHS

    I think that so many people are grossed out by the thought of eating bugs for psychological reasons. From the time we are little, Americans are raised thinking that bugs are gross, scary and sometimes dangerous, we are told “don’t touch that bug” and it is definitely against social hierarchy if one were to EAT a bug. We allow this mental block and predisposed disposition to blind us from the fact that bugs could actually be a logical source of nutrition. As stated in the article, insects have high amounts of protein and raising them is much more efficient than livestock in terms of energy and financial expense. Eating insects is not completely appalling to me, I think that more people should be open to the idea because it has a lot more benefits and no apparent detriments.

    #APESWITHHUTH #DoNowInsects

    “Frequently Asked Questions.” IAF What Is Entomophagy? N.p., n.d. Web. 22 May 2015. .

    “Would You Eat Insects?.” KQED Education. 12 May 2015. Web. 21 May 2015. <http: angel.mgsd.k12.nc.us="" section="" content="" default.asp?wci="pgDisplay&WCU=CRSCNT&ENTRY_ID=D47EB1FAA0ED4230A04AC2AE

  • Lynch_MHS

    It is so valuable and efficient to eat insects. However, they are not in our diet because they are gross. Who would want to hear the crunch and they don’t taste the best so I understand why people are hesitant. However, they are such a good source of protein and they aren’t difficult to process. The only bad thing about promoting the eating of insects is if someone tried to eat a wild insect and it was poisonous. If it is going to become part of the culture, we would probably need to educate people a little bit on which insects to eat and so on. Insects would help cut down on the extremely excessive amount of hectares farmed each year. I would be ok with eating bugs because I am aware of their nutritional value. We could cut back so much on the processed food by eating insects. I’m not sure I’m comfortable with them being in our food without us knowing but if they are in there for purpose I’m not against it. I also don’t know if I’m quite there with eating them alone yet but that might develop with the change in culture.

    Could we try to start incorporating this into our meals instead of just eating them plan? Would that be more acceptable?

    #nastybutnutritious

    @KQEDedspace

    #APESWITHHUTH

    #DoNowInsects

    “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

    Edible Insects: Finger Lickin’ Grub. Dir. Sheraz Sadiq. 24 Apr. 2012. KQEDeducation. Web. 18 May 2015. .

    McCafferty, Keith. “Eating Insects For Survival.” Field & Stream. Field & Stream, 04 Aug. 2011. Web. 18 May 2015.

  • Sons of Liberty

    I already have – during jungle training (USMC).

  • Norton_MHS

    I see nothing wrong with it. The only reason it seems absurd to most people in the US is because we didn’t grow up eating it. If we had grown up eating it, it would seem completely normal. If there was an only vegetarian island somewhere that heard we eat animals, they would think it’s disgusting. If 80% of the world can do it, we most certainly can too. Once the psychological barriers are broken, I think that will be most of the fight. To quote most parents, “How do you know you don’t like it, if you haven’t tried it.”. Happy eating.

    Got insects?

    #donowinsects
    #APESwithHuth
    #justeatit

    “Edible Bugs and Insects: Are These High Protein Critters the Future of Food? | Precision Nutrition.” Precision Nutrition. N.p., 27 Aug. 2014. Web. 22 May 2015.

  • Dixon_MHS

    I personally find the thought of eating bugs disgusting. Although there is absolutely no reason not to eat bugs except for people’s general dislike of bugs. I personally think that just disliking their appearance is a great reason not to eat them. Unless I were starving to death and had no food around me, I would not eat bugs. If other people want to eat them, I think thats great. They are rich in protein and good fats and high in calcium, iron and zinc so if you want to eat bugs go ahead. I however will have to pass.

    What would it take to get you to eat bugs?

    #APESWITHHUTH
    #DoNowInsects

    “Would You Eat Insects?.” KQED Education. 12 May 2015. Web. 21 May 2015.

    “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

  • Interdonato_MHS

    I don’t think eating bugs is all that bad. Bugs are a great source of nutrients and protein and for countries who can’t afford to have meat look to eating bugs to get what they need so they don’t starve. A lot of people think bugs are really gross and nasty, and I happen to be one of those people. However, I would be willing to try and eat a bug because it’s not like it will crawl back up your throat. People’s main problem is that bugs are creepy crawly creatures and that’s all they can focus on which they fail to see what great nutritional value they have. For example, 1 kg of beef has 320g of protein, however, 1 kg of termites has 350g of protein! Bugs also take considerably less water than beef does to cook so that saves poor countries a lot of water that they could use for something else. Overall, I think that eating bugs really isn’t that bad and all people need to do is forget about the crawling aspect and think about how good they are for you. As someone who is very creeped out and terrified by bugs, I would be willing to try bugs. The question is, how do we get everyone else on board?

    #What’scrawlinginmymouth?

    #APESwithHUTH

    #DoNowInsects

    @KQEDEdspace

    “Beetlemania: Should We All Be Eating Insects?” The Guardian. N.p., 13 Sept. 2013. Web. 21 May 2015.

  • Castanho_MHS

    I would be willing to eat insects for the future. The population is constantly increasing. It is proposed that by 2050, current agrictulure rates would have to double. Insects could thus be raised in great quantities to make up for nutrients, protein, etc. Insects require far less land and water to sustain compared to livestock. Insects are also about 80% edible whereas livestock is about 40%. Many say that eating insects is not bad, especially when they are cooked in a dish. I don’t picture myself ordering a side of maggots at a restaurant, however I would still be willing to try this for the greater cause. I feel that America will still think of consumption of insects as a disgusting act however we fail to realize that we eat insects all the time without even realizing it. In reality, insects could overall contribute as a more healthy and more eco-friendly alternative to satisfying our needs.

    Would you eat insects for the better cause?

    #DoNowInsects

    #APESWITHHUTH

    #meetingourneeds

    Alford, Justine. “Will We All Be Eating Insects In 50 Years?” IFLScience. N.p., 28 Aug. 2014. Web. 22 May 2015.

  • McLelland_MHS

    i would personally never eat bugs. Just the Sheer thought of eating them brings me to a cringe point and I will never do it. As to other people they are more eligible to have a bug diet. It is smarter and more conservative because of the land and water they use compared to cows. I would probably not encourage any other people to eat them but I wouldn’t judge them if they did it because they can do whatever they want and that’s not any of my business. This will defiantly combat the drought problem in California. If the citizens of the state can step up beyond the fear of bugs then they may be able to save thousands of gallons of water.

    Do you think U.S citizens can overcome fears and eat bugs?

    #DoNowInsects

    #APESWITHHUTH

    #BugsLife2?

    Alford, Justine. “Will We All Be Eating Insects In 50 Years?” IFLScience. N.p., 28 Aug. 2014. Web. 22 May 2015.

  • Herring_MHS

    I would not eat bugs if I had the choice. I think that they are gross, and the mental barrier is too big for me to pick up a squirmy big and take a juicy bite out of it while it squirts in my mouth. No, thank you. Maybe if bikes were fried or baked, and the had the texture of nuts or something, but otherwise they would be just gross. I hope that I don’t have to eat bugs now as part of a “balanced diet.” Although they may be healthy, and a great source of protein, here in America we already have other sources of protein such as beef, and pigs. We may start adding bugs, to salads and such, but otherwise, they should be introduced slowly. Why take a giant leap, when we can integrate?

    #DoNowInsects

    #APESWithHuth

    #BabySteps

    Alford, Justine. “Will We All Be Eating Insects In 50 Years?” IFLScience. N.p., 28 Aug. 2014. Web. 22 May 2015.

    • DJohnson_MHS

      I do not agree with you Van. I believe that bugs are a good source of protein and are sustainable. They take less land and water so therefor they are better for the environment.

      #DoNowInsects

      #APESwithHuth

      #GotInsects

      Alford, Justine. “Will We All Be Eating Insects In 50 Years?” IFLScience. N.p., 28 Aug. 2014. Web. 22 May 2015.

  • McNeely_MHS

    Personally I wouldn’t want to eat bugs, but I can understand that there are benefits to a grub diet. If you compare the nutritional value of insects to beef and even fish bugs are much more healthy. However, there are certain things to be aware of when eating bugs. Some insects can be toxic, and can cause you to get sick. Also, anything in an urban area will most likely have pesticides in it. For the sake of flavor, most bugs should be cooked before eaten. A food barrier exists for most people because bugs are not a commonplace food. The texture is uncommon and most people just think it’s gross. But that doesn’t mean it isn’t good for you. What’s stopping you from eating bugs?

    #DoNowInsects

    #APESWithHuth

    #BugsAreGross

    Bryant, Charles W.. “How Entomophagy Works” 15 April 2008. HowStuffWorks.com. 26 May 2015.

    • Herring_MHS

      Emory,

      Same. I agree that I would not want to eat bugs, however, bugs are very sustainable and are good sources of protein without requiring much water. In first world countries, like the great one we live in, there is a huge mental barrier about eating bugs. It will be had, But I believe that everyone, even the great Americans can, and will do what is necessary to be sustainable if need be.

      #WhenTheTimeComes

      “Frequently Asked Questions.” IAF What Is Entomophagy? N.p., n.d. Web. 22 May 2015. .

  • Garcia_MHS

    I feel that the World is quite a long way away from needing to resort to eating insects for survival. If the proper methods are taken to regulate the amount of food that the world is currently consuming, and through proper rationing we can avoid eating insects all together. Eating insects should be a last ditch effort to sustain our food supply when all else fails, but if the amount of food people have access to is limited and through proper regulation we can sustain our current food supply with more appealing food sources. #DoNowInsects #ApesWithHuth @Huth_MHS

  • Owen Waldron

    I feel that if we didn’t have the option such as the world was running out of water and we couldn’t maintain the water level to support animals such as cows and pigs, I might be able to eat bugs and insects but in the current condition we are in I don’t think I would have the heart or will to eat insects.

    • Parker_MHS

      Dearest Owen,
      It may turn out that we need to eat these insects. In all reality, our planets projected population by 2050 is 9.6 billion. That is a very scary number. That is also a lot of mouths to feed. Do you think we can feed all of them without some miraculous change in environmental engineering? No “Owen”. I’ll tell ya something, ya better get ready to eat some bugs because the time is coming.

    • Jacobs_MHS

      Owen,

      Due to the population increase in the next coming decades, you will surely be eating bugs. There is no “current condition” here. You are being close minded to only consider bugs if we had a shortage of water. You need to change your ways and start sautéing some grubs.

      kind regards,

      Mitch Jacobs

      • Owen Waldron

        I was in the mind that the current condition is the now in we can eat meats not for the future where as later we will probably not have a choice to switch and I’m not necessarily being close minded just hesitant

    • Crowel_MHS

      I hate to tell you this bud, this isn’t about what you have the “heart or will” to do. This. Is. About. BUGS. We have reached a point in population that we have over 7 billion people, yet we still consume copious amounts of red meats, namely beef. This pound of beef requires two THOUSAND five HUNDRED gallons of water. Obviously, this is not sustainable. One pound of crickets requires one gallon. Not one thousand, one. There is no waiting for the water level to reach the point of crisis, as it will no longer matter. We need to change our lifestyles now, so we have sustainable water in the future.

      “Would You Eat Insects?” KQED Education KQED Public Media for Northern CA. Web. 28 May 2015.

      #BugBaklava

      #APESwithHuth

      #DoNowInsects

    • Doolen_MHS

      The current condition of the world is that we are growing in size and to feed all of those people we need to come up with ways to use less energy and resources. To solve that problem many people have turned to eating insects. Now personally I would not eat insects but for some people it is cheaper and very nutritional.

      #APESWITHHUTH

      #savemoneyeatinsects

      #DoNowInsects

      “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

      “Would You Eat Insects?.” KQED Education. 12 May 2015. Web. 21 May 2015. <http: angel.mgsd.k12.nc.us="" section="" content="" default.asp?wci="pgDisplay&WCU=CRSCNT&ENTRY_ID=D47EB1FAA0ED4230A04AC2A

    • Carberry_MHS

      Because eating insects isn’t traditionally in the American culture, there is a large psychological barrier for a lot of people. However, if you look at the issue from a global, economic, and ecological point of view, the thought of eating bugs isn’t so bad. They are packed with protein and besides that, they are a lot more ecologically friendly when considering the amount of water and land it takes to raise them. It wouldn’t mean diet consisting only of insects but rather incooperating them more and more. 80% of the world’s cultures already eat and enjoy insects. It is definitely worth the try because the current condiiton is serious and getting worse.

      #donowinsects

      #APESwithHuth

      #Beopenminded

      1. “Why Eat Bugs?” Girl Meets Bug. 09 Jan. 2010. Web. 22 May 2015. .

  • Bernhardt_MHS

    As gross as it is to think about eating bugs, it is bound to become a part of many American’s diets in the future. With their nutritional value (equal if not greater than the amount of protein found in beef with significantly less fat) insects will become a global food source. And with the thousands of different species and their abundance the source will be cheap and plentiful for everyone. Beef is much more expensive and limited and will eventually become too scarce to provide for the majority of our population. Bugs will inevitably work their way into our food chain, the question is when will we accept it?
    #APESwithHUTH
    #DoNowInsects
    #BugsBeforeBeef
    Alford, Justine. “Will We All Be Eating Insects In 50 Years?” IFLScience. N.p., 28 Aug. 2014. Web. 22 May 2015.

    • Vazquez_MHS

      I agree with you. Is better for the environment and for us. Although bugs a not very appealing to eat, there will come a time where we will get pass the appealing part and eat bugs. I’m positive that people back in the old days thought that chicken was gross and unappealing but look at us now; we eat chicken everyday. We eat so much chicken that we compare it to other things. Next thing you know will be saying “hmm, this taste like grasshopper”.

    • Guzman_MHS

      I too believe that eating insects is bound to become apart of many American’s diets in the future. People are already eating bugs in their favorite foods without even knowing it! Eating insects is a sustainable way of life. They have as much protein, or more, as beef has and it is not as expensive to raise bugs. Although eating bugs does not seem appealing it is bound to happen because of the lack of resources we are facing. I hope we, as Americans, accept this idea of eating insects soon because not only is it earth friendly, but it puts us on the path to a sustainable society.

      #APESwithHuth

      #DoNowInsects

      #TastesLikeChicken

      “U.S. Food and Drug Administration.” Defect Levels Handbook. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 May 2015.

      “Would You Eat Insects?” KQED Education KQED Public Media for Northern CA. Web. 28 May 2015.

  • Guzman_MHS

    Although the idea of a fried grasshopper is not as appetizing as a nice t-bone steak, I think I would eat insects as apart of a sustainable, earth friendly diet. Not only does it save tons of water, but bugs are filled with all sorts of protein and vitamins. And with the drought that is going on in California, bugs are becoming to look tastier and tastier. You cannot compare raising cattle to raising bugs. Cattle require land mass, gallons and gallons of water, their reproduction time is longer, and they are limited. While bugs reproduce quickly, they do not require a lot of water and a lot of land. Eating bugs only puts us on the best path to a sustainable future. And I mean hey, there are already bugs in our food, so why not take it a step further? What will it take to get people to change their minds about consuming insects?

    #APESwithHUTH

    #DoNowInsects

    #TastesLikeChicken

    “U.S. Food and Drug Administration.” Defect Levels Handbook. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 May 2015. .

    “Would You Eat Insects?” KQED Education KQED Public Media for Northern CA. Web. 28 May 2015.

    • Bodine_mhs

      I completely agree! Insects may not appeal to the normal diet for Americans, but it is more earth friendly. Not only is it earth friendly, it is also economically friendly! It costs much less to farm these insects than other meat related animals. They are packed with all different kinds of nutrients and protein.

      Would you rather starve or eat insects?

      #APESWITHHUTH

      #DoNowInsects

      #crunch&munch

      “How Many Insect Parts and Rodent Hairs Are Allowed in Your Food?” SIxWise. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 May 2015.

      Edible Insects: Finger Lickin’ Grub. Dir. Sheraz Sadiq. 24 Apr. 2012. KQEDeducation. Web. 18 May 2015. .

  • Courtney F

    Mrs Day, Period 5.
    In order to help reduce animal consumption and to save the environment, I think it would be ideal that everything eats insects. However, I personally think that I would not participate in this delicacy myself due to my upbringing. The fear instilled in many people remains today because there is not enough information about allergic reactions. There is also the possibility of toxins and pesticides to be present in insects as well.

    For more information: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/picture/2013/sep/13/eating-insects-infographic-flies-entomophagy#zoomed-picture

    • Castanho_MHS

      Although there are some hazards with consuming insects, we would make sure to identify potential threats. The overall benefit of incorporating insects into our diet goes beyond just the nutrition. Insects would essentially replace some agriculture techniques due to the fast reproduction rates of insects. We could essentially industrialize this reproduction and obtain a almost unlimited food supply that are packed with nutrients. Overall, this new “agriculture” would use less water and energy than it would take for traditional cattle.

      “Frequently Asked Questions.” IAF What Is Entomophagy? N.p., n.d. Web. 29 May 2015.

    • Norton_MHS

      I hadn’t that about the physical barrier due to allergies and reactions. I’m sure if eating insects ever became a global thing, the information regarding allergies and reactions would be gathered quickly. I still feel that the larger barrier for the rest of the 20% of the world is the psychological one. People have grown up learning that you don’t put insects in your mouth, so now people aren’t doing it.

      Got insects?

      #APESWITHHUTH

      #DoNowInsects

    • Maguire_mhs

      Over 80% of the world eats bugs and although there are probably some complications with allergies you don’t hear about any. If the US was to start implementing insects as food there would most likely be extensive research to make sure they are safe to eat. There are many upsides to eating bugs and it could help the economy as well as the environment. Some bug fragments are already used in food already.

      “U.S. Food and Drug Administration.” Defect Levels Handbook. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 May 2015.

  • Tatum

    Would you eat insects as part of a sustainable, earth-friendly diet?

    Besides the initial “grossness” of eating insects there really aren’t any draw backs. They are abundant ,high in protein, and economical. I think once people get over the fact that they’re eating bugs this won’t be a big deal at all since there are so many positive reasons for eating insects. I would definitely eat insects for protein I think it’s pretty much the same thing as eating chicken or fish or whatever other creatures we eat.

    If the insects as food thing ends up catching on how would it be regulated as far as restaurants or grocery stores selling them to people?

    Other Resources:

    http://angel.mgsd.k12.nc.us/section/content/default.asp?WCI=pgDisplay&WCU=CRSCNT&ENTRY_ID=D47EB1FAA0ED4230A04AC2AE8FD73F3B

    http://angel.mgsd.k12.nc.us/section/content/default.asp?WCI=pgDisplay&WCU=CRSCNT&ENTRY_ID=D47EB1FAA0ED4230A04AC2AE8FD73F3B

    @KQEDedspace

    #APESWITHHUTH

    #KQEDDONOW

  • nick S

    I personally would not eat insects as a part of my daily diet since insects have always been known to be dirty and disgusting. If my whole I had a more positive intro into insects it would be more of a possibility for insects to be a part of my diet. Insects seam to be the most environmentally friendly food source but the largest con is that the majority of the worlds population find insects to be disgusting.

  • Maybe Him

    I will never eat bugs, well maybe, but only if everybody else is forced to eat them, and I have proof that everybody (including the rich and famous) are eating them on a daily basis. But this will never happen. Truth is, psychologists will have celebrities endorse eating bugs (which they won’t really eat themselves), marketers can come up with fancy packaging to sell bugs, they will sell them at a high price to give us the illusion that it is a high quality food, etc… I will not be swayed by these sneaky schemes. I don’t live in a third world country, I’m a skilled engineer and I didn’t work my ass off for years to trade my hard earned cattle meat for insects. What is happening is that demographics are pushing the middle class to the pits, and cattle meat is slowly becoming the food of the “gods”, only available to the richest. Believe me, these hypocrite “celebrities” will fine dine on steak far into the future while the working class (with college degrees) will be convinced or forced to eat these disgusting insects. I will not eat your disgusting insects unless I’m stuck in a survival situation. Give me my steak. Unless everybody eats insects, I will never do it. Over my dead body. I will not accept this hypocrisy, this blatant attempt to push the middle class into eating humiliating garbage, no matter how many “celebrities” endorse it.

  • Samantha Calderon

    Mrs. Day’s 5th period
    The benefit of the bug make it all sound better about eating them but the initial thought of putting a bug in my salad or in my tacos and feeling the texture in my mouth gives me the “ick factor”. I’m open minded about eating bugs just have to over come the texture of the bugs in my mouth.

  • Paola Lopez-Solorzano

    eating insects instead of greenhouse livestock is a better idea. #5

  • Naomi K

    It maybe gross but when you get out of your psychological perception of insects, and focus on what the world is going through especially environmental issues, insects are more likely to maintain sustainable environments in communities than animals like cattle. In addition to that they have more protein and less fat which is good.

  • Jonathan Perez

    I would eat insects at a certain time because they are rich in nutrition’s. Also because they consume less resources to grow and reproduce.

  • Beethoven Gerber

    It is essential to the future of our generation and generations to come that we prioritize the most sustainable options available to us in every aspect of our lives. By relying on GH gas/water-heavy products like meat and dairy for nutrition that we could just as easily receive from insects, we are wasting time, land and money. An insect diet would allow us to reclaim land used by the livestock industry, reduce GH gases, and cut food prices. A global shift to entomophagy comes with innumerable benefits that will no doubt benefit future generations as all resources are put forth to protect and save the planet.

  • Lexus M

    I personally think that eating Insects is a good idea for the environment and for yourself, but i wouldn’t want to eat any insects unless i’m in a situation where I have to.

  • Beth Dolin

    I’d love to say that I’d eat bugs. I really would. But you know, the psychological factor is just to strong for me. I think that it may be a good cost effective way, especially in food insecure countries, to get the sources of protein and nutrients that are necessary for a healthy diet. However, personally, I know that never in my life will I eat bugs. Never. But to all of you that would, you go.

  • Jessica Chavez

    Bugs should be eaten by Americans! They are beneficial not only to the human body since they are loaded with protein, vitamins, and iron, but bugs are also earth-friendly to produce. Its vital that Americans start to introduce bugs into our diets, because Americans use lots of the world’s natural resources.

  • Jorja

    I personally would not eat insects at this time. As a vegetarian, I already try to make an effort to help the environment, and I am fortunate to have a sufficient enough diet that I would not need to eat insects for nutrition. However, I believe this idea should be encouraged for people who are food insecure, as it is environmentally efficient and a cost effective solution.

  • Luis Ramirez Gomez

    Ms Day period 5

    Bugs should eaten as part of a earth friendly diet. They are packed with tons of protein and way less fat than most beef or pork. Also takes way less water to raise insects than some cows. Especially with the drought going on in California we would be preserving more of water by cutting down on the production of meats.
    #DonowInsects

  • Taylor Foster

    Bugs most definitely should be eaten. They are very nutritious in which they have more protein and less saturated fat then meat does which is a good thing. Already 80% of the world eats insects so I don’t see why we shouldn’t start eating them too. Not only do they benefit people’s health, but they have a positive impact on the environment as well. Insects produce less waste which potentially means fewer greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane being emitted into the atmosphere. As a result, insects have a positive impact on humans and the atmosphere.

  • Orbelina Alvarado

    I might consider the possibility to eat insects at some point because they are rich in nutrition and are healthier than other meats. They also consume less resources to grow and to reproduce which would benefit the environment. #5

  • Hyu

    I would be willing to eat bugs, but I would prefer not to have to eat an actual bug. I would much rather eat the products of the bugs, such as flour. This is still healthy for the environment and a good compromise for those who do not wish to eat an actual bug, such as I. This option was showed in the “Edible Insects: Finger Lickin’ Good” video displayed above. Everyone should at least try to eat bugs in order to help preserve the environment and help the earth. #donowinsects
    MAHS HumBio5th Per

  • Luis Acosta-Linares

    As the world’s population continues to grow, we should consider eating insects as part of our diet because not only do they require less water to raise, but also they provide us with more protein and vitamin B-12 than a hamburger or ground beef would. In addition, they generate less gas emissions such as methane and carbon dioxide.

  • Jennifer G

    I would consider eating insects, although I would have to overcome the psychological factor and there is not a widely available market for it. In general it would be beneficial for more bugs to be consumed as a replacement for other livestock but many people would resist it
    #5

  • Miranda Dobberstein

    Not only will many people be starving in the future due to the rate that the global population is growing, but the earth will continue to be destroyed by the pollution that goes into trying to create enough food. Luckily, there is a solution. Everyone needs to eat insects. “Ew” you say? Not only are insects healthier choices for people (since they contain more protein and less fat) but they are significantly better for the environment. There are 1,900 types of insects that can be eaten. Not only do all those insects produce more with 1lb of feed, but they take way less water and produce way less CO2. 1 pound of beef takes 2,900 gallons of water to produce, while 1 lb of cricket takes only 1 gallon of water. And 1 kg of increased weight on a cow produces 2,850 gallons of CO2, and 1 kg of increased weight on a meal worm produces only 8 gallons of CO2. Isn’t it obvious what the better choice is?

  • Allison Collins

    Entomology has been around for thousands of years…but not in America. We are known fro our agriculture and our live stock, Why would we get rid of the plentiful resources and switch to bug farming? Our world is evolving, people are more open to different social ideas, new laws are being passed allowing more freedom, we even have a black president…and now society is trying to convince the country to drop beef and pork and crunch on some bugs. Other societies eat insects because that is their way of life or it’s what the land has provided for them. We have the opportunity to have more than insects so we should take advantage of that.This may be my feminine side talking but I truly think the thought of eating bugs is revolting.

  • Russell Wong

    The production of insects for human consumption is a fantastic idea and should be implemented much more than it already is. Bugs are many times more efficient than cattle or pigs at producing a source of food that is higher in protein and lower in fat. Instead of having to keep their bodies warm, bugs are cold blooded so they don’t need to expend energy on warming themselves and more of their food is turned into protein. People would be able to grow their own food without having to own a ranch or a farm, sacrificing only a few boxes in which to keep those slimy, sqirmy, tasty little giblets I squash nearly every week.
    Now after all of that being said, I am never, ever going to take part in consuming even one nasty little fly. The psychological aspect of putting something in my mouth that I see flying around my room or sitting on a leaf does not sit well with me and I’m probably gonna puke. Others are free to do as they please, just know that there will never be anything like that in or around my body, dead or alive, ever.

  • Nikolai Tarran

    Bugs are a great alternative to producing meat. It takes over 1,000 gallons of water to make one beef patty, where as bugs use a fraction of that number to live. Bugs also contain more concentrated protein than beef, which makes them an extremely healthy option in a diet. In addition to the protein they contain, bugs are also rich in vitamins and iron which are crucial to a healthy diet.

    I would only eat bugs in a powered form combined with other foods. I would never eat a plain bug still in its natural form because I would never be able to get past the fact that I would be eating an actual bug.

  • Joe Freeman

    No I wouldnt because its just gross and its not right to kill bugs and eat them. They also have feelings. Why would you do that? Instead of trying to create a replacement to meat, you start eating insects? I would never eat a poor insect. It belongs to nature and its not our right to just take it from its natural place.

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