Previously on Forum

Young fans wait for autographs from Coco Crisp #4 of the Oakland Athletics before the game against the Tampa Bay Rays at the Oakland-Alameda Coliseum on July 22, 2016 in Oakland, California.

The Oakland A’s would like to build their new stadium within walking distance of downtown Oakland, next to Lake Merritt. The A’s say the location, on Peralta Community College District land, is “uniquely Oakland” and well-served by public transportation. The proposal is drawing cheers from many fans after decades of the team trying to move out of the city. But critics of the plan worry the new stadium will destroy existing neighborhoods and affordable housing as well as speed gentrification. Forum talks with A’s president Dave Kaval about the proposed stadium plan and the A’s future in Oakland.

More Information:
OaklandBallpark.org
Guests:
Dave Kaval,
president, Oakland A’s
Nina Thorsen, producer, KQED News and the California Report
Robert Gammon news editor, East Bay Express

US President Donald Trump listens during a meeting on United Nations Reform at the UN headquarters on September 18, 2017 in New York City. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

For the first time since taking office, President Trump will address the 193-country General Assembly of the United Nations on Tuesday. In comments at the U.N. on Monday, Trump said the organization is too costly and needs to better define its global mission. We’ll discuss Trump’s speech, including what was said about North Korea, the deterioration of democracy in Venezuela, and climate change.

Guests:
Somini Sengupta,
United Nations bureau chief, New York Times; author, “The End of Karma: Hope and Fury Among India’s Young”
Stewart Patrick, senior fellow and director of the program on International Institutions and Global Governance at the Council on Foreign Relations; author, “The Sovereignty Wars: Reconciling America with the World”
David Rennie Washington bureau chief, The Economist

a man wearing a tie yells at a man at a desk

Robert Sutton specializes in dealing with difficult people. Specifically, working with them–or around them. In “The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal with People Who Treat You Like Dirt,” his sequel to the bestselling “The No Asshole Rule,” Sutton provides tips on how to outsmart bullies and how to stifle one’s “inner jackass.” The Stanford professor of management science and engineering joins us in studio.

Guest:
Robert Sutton,
professor of management science and engineering, Stanford; author, “The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal With People Who Treat You Like Dirt” and “Good Boss, Bad Boss: How to Be the Best and Learn from the Worst”

Katy Tur is the author of "Unbelievable: My Front-Row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American History."

When NBC News and MSNBC correspondent Katy Tur was assigned to cover the Trump presidential campaign, her editors assured her it would be short-term–no more than six weeks. Forty states and a year and a half later, Donald Trump was elected president. Now, Tur has published “Unbelievable: My Front-Row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American History,” replete with campaign trail gossip and stories of being singled out by Trump at campaign rallies. Tur joins us in studio to discuss her experiences trailing Trump, today’s media landscape and the latest political news.

Guest:
Katy Tur,
correspondent, NBC News; Anchor, MSNBC Live; author, “Unbelievable: My Front-Row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American History”

Supporters of U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) hold signs during an event on health care September 13, 2017 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Sen. Sanders held an event to introduce the Medicare for All Act of 2017.

On Wednesday, Senator Bernie Sanders presented his “Medicare for All” bill to promote single-payer health care. We’ll discuss Sanders’ bill, the arguments for and against the single-payer system and the plausibility of it ever coming to fruition in the United States. We’ll also discuss the larger topic of health care markets with medical doctor and Kaiser Health News editor Elisabeth Rosenthal.

Guest:

Elisabeth Rosenthal, medical doctor and editor-in-chief, Kaiser Health News; author of “An American Sickness: How Healthcare became Big Business and How You Can Take it Back”

More Information:

Here’s What’s in Bernie Sanders’ ‘Medicare For All’ Bill (NPR)

Mina Kim and Michael Krasny in conversation during Forum's 30 year celebration on September 12, 2017.

Forum turns 30 this year and we marked the milestone with a celebration Tuesday night at SFJazz. In this segment, we’ll bring you some highlights from that show, which featured a conversation between Friday host Mina Kim and Michael Krasny, who reflected on his nearly 25 years behind Forum’s microphone. Guests included author Salman Rushdie, performer and activist Rhodessa Jones, and a performance by tabla master Zakir Hussain and acclaimed saxophonist Joshua Redman.

More Information on Zakir Hussain and Joshua Redman’s SFJazz Shows

Guests:

Salman Rushdie, author most recently of “The Golden House”
Rhodessa Jones, founder and director, The Medea Project: Theater for Incarcerated Women
Zakir Hussian, tabla master; 2017 SFJAZZ Lifetime Achievement honoree
Joshua Redman, jazz saxophonist

A woman holds a US flag and a constitutional pamphlet in her hands during a special naturalization ceremony in honor of Citizenship Day and Constitution day on Ellis Island in New York on September 16, 2016.

The new Annenberg Constitution Day Civics Survey finds that more than a third of respondents do not know what is in the First Amendment, and that only a quarter of Americans are able to name all three branches of government. We’ll discuss the survey’s findings, the importance of civic education, and take your questions about the Constitution.

Guests:

Jack Rakove, professor of history, American studies and political science, Stanford University; author, “Revolutionaries: A New History of the Invention of America”
Kathleen Hall Jamieson, professor of communication, Annenberg School for Communication; director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania

Resources Mentioned on Air:

A black and white photo of Julie Lythcott-Haims, author of "Real American: A Memoir." She has dark, curly hair and is wearing a necklace.

Julie Lythcott-Haims sold Girl Scout cookies and later ran track in high school. But as a black and biracial woman, Lythcott-Haims says her identity was often questioned, even though she felt as American as her peers. As the descendant of a South Carolina slave and her owner, Lythcott-Haims writes, “I’m so American it hurts,” She joins Forum to talk about her book “Real American: A Memoir”, what it means to be a real American and the racism and microaggressions she faced throughout her life.

Guest:

Julie Lythcott-Haims, author & public speaker, “Real American: A Memoir” and “How to Raise An Adult: Break Free of the Overparenting Trap and Prepare Your Kids for Success”

Related Links:

KQED’s MindShift: Stepping Back from Overparenting: A Stanford Dean’s Perspective

fingers holding social security card

Equifax, one of the country’s main credit reporting companies, revealed last week that a data breach exposed up to 143 million Americans’ social security numbers and other personal information. Lawmakers are now calling for stricter rules protecting consumer data and for a probe of Equifax, three of whose managers reportedly sold company stock in July. We’ll discuss the scope and impact of the breach and what consumers should do to protect themselves.

In just over two weeks, more than 300,000 Rohingya refugees have fled from Myanmar into neighboring Bangladesh, due to state violence against the Muslim minority group. The Myanmar military says the violence is only a response to attacks by a militant group associated with the Rohingya, and that innocent civilians haven’t been targeted. But the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights said this week that the situation looks like a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing.” We’ll bring you the latest on the situation in Myanmar and discuss the future of the Rohingya, a stateless group that has faced decades of abuse and discrimination.

Guests:
Joshua Kurlantzick, senior fellow for Southeast Asia, Council on Foreign Relations

Anbarasan  Ethirajan, South Asia editor, BBC

San Diego State University psychology professor Jean Twenge has been studying generational differences for decades. Her latest research focuses on what she calls iGen: the age group that has not known life without the internet. Born between 1995 and 2012, members of iGen have grown up inseparable from their smartphones and according to Twenge are “on the brink of the worst mental-health crisis in decades.” Twenge joins Forum to discuss her new book: “iGen: Why Today’s Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy – and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood.”

Guests:
Jean Twenge, professor of Psychology, San Diego State University; author, “iGen:Why Today’s Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy – and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood”

An exterior of the state capitol is shown on January 5, 2006 in Sacramento, California.

One in five employees at the tax-collecting Board of Equalization works with a relative, according to a report from the Sacramento Bee. The Board, whose tax administration functions were stripped away by lawmakers in June, has been subject of a series of audits exposing financial misconduct and mismanagement. We’ll discuss the status of the audits and get an update on how the Board’s successor agencies are serving California’s taxpayers.

an Oakland police patrol car

Bay Area filmmaker Peter Nicks’ new documentary “The Force” takes a close look at the Oakland Police Department during a tumultuous period marked by a sexual exploitation scandal, serial resignations, and ongoing federal scrutiny. The filmmakers embedded with the agency for two years, and sat in on trainings and witnessed internal debates on the use force by officers. We discuss what the film reveals about the culture and inner workings of the department, and how OPD is working to rebuild the public’s trust.

A deal was reached Monday on Senate Bill 54, the so-called sanctuary state bill, which was crafted to prevent California law enforcement officials from cooperating with federal immigration agents. We’ll discuss what the amended bill looks like, including a compromise between Governor Brown and bill author Senator Kevin de Leon to allow local police at their discretion to hold an arrestee for federal agents.

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