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Previously on Forum

U.S. Congressman Eric Swalwell

Democratic Congressman Eric Swalwell, who represents California’s 15th District in the East Bay, joins Forum to discuss his legislative priorities, including reducing student loan debt and fighting the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. We’ll also talk to the Congressman  about his bill to set up a bipartisan commission to investigate Russian interference in the U.S. election and about the fallout from the resignation of National Security Advisor Michael Flynn. The interview is the first in Forum’s series featuring Bay Area members of Congress.

A Greek coast guard captain, Kyriakos Papadopoulos, pulls refugees from the water.

Between 2015 and 2016, 600,000 migrants crossed the water between Turkey and the Greek island of Lesbos, many on small, dangerous inflatable rafts. In her short film “4.1 Miles,” UC Berkeley Journalism alumna Daphne Matziaraki documents the Greek Coast Guard’s overwhelming struggle to save these refugees from drowning. She followed a ship captain for three weeks as he “pulled family after family, child after child, from the ocean and saved their lives,” and looks at his own struggle to make sense of the trauma. Matziaraki joins us in-studio to discuss her film and the ongoing refugee crisis in Greece.

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Russian River Brewing Company customers clink their glasses in Santa Rosa, California.

State Senator Scott Wiener introduced a bill Wednesday that would allow bars, clubs and restaurants in California to serve alcohol until 4 a.m. The current cutoff time of 2 a.m. has been a longtime source of frustration for nightlife advocates, who say the rules disadvantage San Francisco against cities like New York, Chicago and Las Vegas. But critics of similar bills in the past have expressed concern about noise, and law enforcement officials have said that extended drinking hours could lead to more drunk driving. We discuss the proposed bill and hear from both sides.

Evacuees of Japanese descent carry their personal effects preparatory to setting up housekeeping at Manzanar Relocation Center in Manzanar, California.

This Sunday marks the 75th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066 by Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The order forcibly removed approximately 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry from their homes and sent them to live in prison-like camps. Here in the Bay Area, flower growers in Richmond, sweet shop owners in San Francisco’s Little Tokyo and others were packed into Greyhound buses and sent to assembly centers like Tanforan Racetrack in San Bruno, where they lived inside horse stalls before being moved to camps in the desert. We reflect on the legacy of that presidential order in the Bay Area and discuss its significance today.

The Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement: A Digital Archive (Bancroft Library, UC Berkeley)

Newport Beach, California

The West Coast is experiencing unprecedented erosion on many of its beaches, according to a U.S. Geological Survey report published this week in the journal “Nature Communications.” Scientists examined coastal changes at 29 beaches across Washington, Oregon and California, finding that the 2015-2016 El Nino caused unprecedented erosion. We discuss the findings and what can be done to protect California’s coastal areas.

More Information:

Extreme Oceanographic Forcing and Coastal Response Due to the 2015-2016 El Niño (Nature Communications)

Mountain-Bike-for-Forum

Mountain biking advocates in Marin County are frustrated at what they see as the slow pace of new trail openings, promised in a 2014 Marin County road and trail management plan. They say that the sport is growing at an annual rate of more than 11 percent and they need more technically challenging trails. But hiking and equestrian groups argue that they are the biggest users of the open space and that the bikers travel too fast for safety and disrupt nature. Forum discusses the issue and hears from both sides of the debate.

Anthony Rendon

Several weeks after the election of President Donald Trump, California Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon said in a speech to lawmakers that the state faced a “major existential threat.” Rendon has since taken vocal stands against the Trump administration’s immigration raids and travel ban, which is now on hold. We’ll talk to Speaker Rendon about the challenges California may face under President Trump and the Assembly’s priorities for this term.

Walter Murch stands behind a laptop.

Prolific film editor and sound designer Walter Murch has been in Hollywood for over half a century, working on such films as “Apocalypse Now,” “The Godfather” and “The English Patient.” But the three time Oscar-winner has another hobby: astrophysics. In his spare time, Murch steps away from the big screen and tries to prove Bode’s Law, a 240-year-old theory on the spacing of the planets in the solar system. Murch joins us to discuss his work in astrophysics and the connections he sees between astronomy and sound editing.

Michael Flynn

Michael Flynn resigned as President Trump’s national security advisor on Monday night amid allegations that he misled Vice President Mike Pence on conversations he had with the Russian ambassador about American sanctions in December — before Trump’s inauguration. Trump has named Lt. Gen. Joseph Kellogg acting national security advisor. Forum discusses Flynn’s resignation and its national security implications as Democrats demand a broader investigation into Russian ties.

This aerial view from a California Department of Water Resources drone shows water flowing over the auxiliary spillway at Oroville Dam on Saturday, February 11, 2017, after the lake level exceeded 901 feet elevation above sea level.

Evacuations of over 100,000 people near Oroville Dam remained in effect Monday, as engineers worked to repair damage to an emergency spillway that threatened to send torrents of water into nearby towns. State officials say that the 770-foot dam itself is not in danger and the threat of flooding lessened Monday as Lake Oroville’s water level dropped. But more storms are expected this week, prompting officials to continue to drain water from the lake. We discuss the state of the dam, the ongoing impacts on surrounding communities and the condition of the California’s water infrastructure.

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