Previously on Forum

Tom Hayden poses before signing copies of his book, 'Ending The War in Iraq' at Book Soup June 24, 2007 in Los Angeles, California.

Activist Tom Hayden died Sunday night in Santa Monica of complications from a stroke he suffered a year and a half ago. Hayden was a civil rights advocate who rode with the Freedom Riders in the South during the 60s. He became most famous as an anti-war activist and founder of Students for a Democratic Society, and for his marriage to actress Jane Fonda. Hayden was very active in California politics serving in the California Assembly and Senate and mounting a failed bid for the Governor’s office. Joining us to remember Tom Hayden is Todd Gitlin, Professor of Journalism and Sociology at Columbia University. Gitlin succeeded Hayden as president of Students for a Democratic Society.

More Information
Longtime Progressive Activist Tom Hayden Dies At 76 (KQED News)

A man dressed up as Uncle Sam on Super Tuesday.

Although they may not be voting in it, people outside America are keeping a close eye on who becomes our next president. In this hour, we talk with foreign journalists about how the election is being perceived outside the U.S. and what impact our next president might have on foreign policy, human rights, trade and other policies of particular interest to the international community.

an illustration of a red elephant and a blue donkey butting heads

Discussing politics with friends and family always has the potential to be awkward, but this political season, it can feel absolutely treacherous. In this hour, we want to hear how the election is affecting your relationships — have you sworn not to discuss politics with certain friends? Have you had to delete family members from your Facebook feed? We’ve gathered a panel to share their stories and offer advice on how to handle political differences in personal relationships.

David Adjaye poses for a portrait.

British-Ghanaian architect David Adjaye has designed buildings and structures all over the world. His recent work, the new National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C., is a long-awaited monument whose design itself brims with historic import. Adjaye has also been tapped to transform San Francisco’s Hunters Point Naval Shipyard. We’ll speak to Adjaye about his designs, past and present, and on becoming the “starchitect” of his time.

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"Yawnah" by Ed Drew is one of they tintypes featured in the "Native Portraits: Contemporary Tintypes" exhibit.

While Ed Drew was deployed in Afghanistan, he created tintype photographs of his comrades — the first known use of the tintype process in a combat zone since the Civil War. Drew’s recent series, “Native Portraits,” depicts members of the Klamath, Modoc and Pit River Paiute tribes of Northern California and Southern Oregon. The series is currently on exhibit at the California Historical Society in San Francisco. We speak with Ed Drew and curator Erin Garcia about the exhibit and media representations of Native people.

Images from “Native Portraits: Contemporary Tintypes”

Ed Drew, "Monica," 2014-15. Tintype. Courtesy of the artist and Robert Koch Gallery
Ed Drew, “Monica,” 2014-15. Tintype. Courtesy of the artist and Robert Koch Gallery
2 - Plummie
Ed Drew, “Plummie,” 2014-15. Tintype. Courtesy of the artist and Robert Koch Gallery
3 - Spayne
Ed Drew, “Spayne,” 2014-15. Tintype. Courtesy of the artist and Robert Koch Gallery
4 - Yawnah
Ed Drew, “Yawnah,” 2014-15. Tintype. Courtesy of the artist and Robert Koch Gallery


WATCH: Photographer on a Mission: Ed Drew (KQED Arts)

Drag queen Scarlett Letter performs on stage during the GX4 Kitty Powers Drag Show.

For decades San Francisco has embraced drag performance, while most of America shunned it as perverse. Now, drag is veering into the mainstream with the TV show “RuPaul’s Drag Race” earning an Emmy and a recent Fox remake of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.” But in San Francisco, drag has remained subversive with a new wave of queens, to whom drag is more like punk performance art than glam dress-up. We’ll talk with San Francisco Chronicle style reporter Tony Bravo and local drag queens about the past and present of San Francisco’s drag scene.

Mentioned on Air:

SF’s New Wave of Drag Queens Rebel Against Glam

This combination of pictures created on October 09, 2016 shows Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri on October 9, 2016.

Republican nominee Donald Trump’s supporters are hoping Wednesday’s third and final presidential debate in Las Vegas will help him regain momentum against Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton. We’ll analyze the debate and discuss the ongoing fallout of the Clinton campaign’s leaked emails and the continued allegations of sexual assault against Trump.

KQED’s Complete Election Coverage

Marcus Samuelsson poses for a portrait.

Chef Marcus Samuelsson’s background is a tableau of different tastes and experiences: Born in Ethiopia and raised in Sweden by adoptive parents, his culinary influences are a swirl of Ethiopian spices and smoked mackerel. When he moved to America and fell in love with Harlem, Samuelsson decided to mix those same flavors into the comfort food he cooked at his restaurant, Red Rooster. Sameulsson joins us to talk about the diverse influences on his cooking and about his new “Red Rooster Cookbook,” which features recipes alongside stories of Harlem’s past.


Twenty five years ago Wednesday, a small, mostly-extinguished grassfire was stoked by a hot, dry wind, that ignited a firestorm in the Oakland and Berkeley hills killing 25 people and destroying more than 3,400 homes. In this hour Forum invites listeners to share their memories from the fire and its aftermath and any lessons learned since the tragedy.

A fan holds a sign in the stands imploring the team to stay in Oakland during the NFL game between the Oakland Raiders and the Kansas City Chiefs at O.co Coliseum on December 6, 2015 in Oakland, California.

The tug of war over the Oakland Raiders continues. On Monday, the Nevada governor signed a bill approving a $750 million tax subsidy to help build a $1.9 billion stadium in Las Vegas, furthering the city’s bid to convince the Raiders to relocate. Raiders owner Mark Davis has already pledged to move the team to Las Vegas, pending approval by the NFL and a vote by team owners. Meanwhile, Oakland mayor Libby Schaaf says she is working to keep the team “where they belong.” We get an update on the Raiders’ status.

Cataract Falls on Mt. Tamalpais.

A first of its kind study of the ecological health of Mt. Tamalpais finds that while birds are thriving, Coho salmon, steelhead trout and some frog species are struggling. We’ll discuss the study, which also looked at the the impact of sudden oak death, invasive species, fires and floods. And we’ll hear what can and should be done to preserve and maintain this favorite destination for Bay Area bikers and hikers.

More Information:
Mt. Tam Health Report Yields Hope — And a Warning (KQED Science)

Measuring the Health of a Mountain

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