Previously on Forum

Environmental activists protest outside the Carrie Gosch Elementary School during a visit by U.S. EPA Adminstrator Scott Pruitt on April 19, 2017 in East Chicago, Indiana.

This Saturday, scientists and their supporters in San Francisco and cities across the country will hold a “March for Science” in response to the Trump administration’s policies on climate change and other issues. The unprecedented action has critics questioning whether scientists should play a role in politics, while supporters argue that scientists must take a strong stance in a time of intense polarization and “alternative facts.” In this hour of Forum, we discuss the upcoming march and hear from local scientists. Tell us what you think: should science and politics mix?

More Information:
Scientists Take to California Streets This Saturday (And Ask You to Join Them) (KQED Science)

Analyst Corey Weiss, who was disgnosed with Autism as a young boy, works at Mindspark on August 24, 2016 in Santa Monica, California.

The Centers for Disease Control estimates that one percent of the global population has autism spectrum disorder. And while events like Autism Awareness Month have raised the disorder’s profile, a Drexel University study found that about 40 percent of young adults with autism are unemployed. But some tech giants like SAP, Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard Enterprise are actively trying to hire employees with autism. In this hour, we’ll look how employers and employees can both benefit from closing the employment gap for those on the autistic spectrum.

Resources Mentioned on Air

University of California President Janet Napolitano is seen at an event on expanding college opportunity on January 16, 2014 in Washington, DC.

University of California President Janet Napolitano joins us this hour to discuss the UC system’s ongoing efforts to mitigate sexual misconduct by faculty, the possibility of an enrollment cap for out-of-state students and the newly-hired Chancellor of UC Berkeley. We’ll also talk to Napolitano about her recent trip to Mexico to promote academic partnerships. What is your question for the UC president?

Author Omar El Akkad poses for a portrait.

“You fight the war with guns, you fight the peace with stories.” That’s from Omar El Akkad’s novel, “American War,” which takes readers 50 years into the future, where the effects of climate change and limited natural resources have caused a second Civil War and split America in two. El Akkad, a longtime journalist who covered Guantanamo Bay, the Arab Spring and the aftermath of Michael Brown’s killing in Ferguson, Missouri, joins us to talk about the novel and how his work as a journalist influences his fiction.

President Donald Trump signs an executive order to try to bring jobs back to American workers and revamp the H-1B visa guest worker program during a visit to the headquarters of tool manufacturer Snap-On on April 18, 2017 in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

President Donald Trump signed his “Buy American, Hire American” executive order on Tuesday in an effort to prevent companies from choosing low-wage foreign workers over Americans. The order takes aim at the federal government’s H-1B visa program, which is supposed to help businesses hire highly-skilled, temporary workers from other countries. But critics of the program say it undercuts American workers and that most H-1B visas simply go to IT workers. But supporters say the program is vital to the tech industry, and argue that President Trump’s changes could hurt innovation. In this hour, we discuss President Trump’s order and how it could affect Silicon Valley.

Stanford mathematician and NPR Weekend Edition contributor Keith Devlin.

Over a decade ago, mathematician Keith Devlin, also known as “The Math Guy” on NPR’s Weekend Edition, set out to research the life and legacy of Leonardo of Pisa, better known as Fibonacci. The Italian mathematician introduced the Hindu-Arabic numeral system and arithmetic to the Western world. “Finding Fibonacci” details Devlin’s journey to revive the long-forgotten mathematician and the people who devoted their lives to understanding his legacy.

Thelton Henderson in his chambers during an interview with KQED's Scott Shafer.

Judge Thelton Henderson is retiring this year from his post as a U.S. District Court Judge in Northern California, saying that at 83-years-old he doesn’t have the stamina to do the job like he used to. The federal judge spent decades on the bench and was a staunch defender of civil rights, presiding over high-profile cases focused on abuse in California prisons and conduct within the Oakland Police Department. We’ll discuss Henderson’s career and legacy with Bob Egelko, legal affairs reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle. And we’ll also hear a recent interview guest host Scott Shafer conducted with Henderson in his chambers.

apartment-for-rent-sign

The San Jose City Council is set to vote Tuesday on new rules that would prohibit landlords from evicting tenants from residential properties without just cause, such as failure to pay rent. Supporters say the rules are needed to prevent retaliatory and arbitrary evictions and to protect renters amid the region’s housing crisis. Landlords say the rules would make it too difficult to evict problematic tenants. If passed, San Jose would join San Francisco, Los Angeles and other California cities that ban so-called no-cause evictions. We take up the debate.

Berkeley-protest-for-Forum

A pro-Trump rally in Berkeley on Saturday was met with counter-demonstrations, resulting in violent clashes and at least 20 arrests. Eleven people were injured and seven of those were taken to hospitals, according to police. John Sepulvado, host of KQED’s “The California Report” covered the so-called “Patriots Day” demonstration and “Antifa” counter-protest. He joins us in the studio to talk about the events.

CORRECTION: Early in this episode we referred to the rally in Berkeley as being permitted. That is inaccurate. Identity Evropa, the white nationalist group, organized the rally but the Berkeley Police Department has confirmed that the event was not issued a permit.

a male doctor and patient look at a screen and talk

All men between the ages of 55 and 69 should have the option of being screened for prostate cancer. That’s according to new guidelines from the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force. It’s a departure from 2012, when the task force discouraged screening for cancer with the prostate specific antigen (PSA) test. The procedure has a significant problem with false positives, which can lead to more testing, which in turn can cause impaired sexual functioning and incontinence. We’ll discuss the new recommendation, which is open for public comment until May 8.

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