(McGraw-Hill)

Some parents in Fremont are demanding the removal of a newly adopted health textbook that deals with sex education topics such as masturbation and bondage. While the book also covers other topics such as nutrition, stress and body image, some parents say the sex education portions are inappropriate for 14 year olds. District officials said this week that they may delay adoption of the textbook.

Guests:
Ann Crosbie, clerk for the board of the Fremont Unified School District
Asfia Ahmed, parent and Fremont School District employee

  • Beth Grant DeRoos

    One need not be a prude to find this one book troubling. Why do teen ager’s need to know about bondage and other fringe sexual issues?

    Sad how the USA produces high school students who rate so low worldwide on math and science, yet schools do all they can to teach about sexual issues that have nothing to do with preventing STD’s, pregnancy etc.

    • Lance

      Teaching kids about prude subjects educates them about relationship power, and consent. With our very litigious work environments, and consent issues over any age group, subjects such as these should not be glossed or ignored because parents feel uncomfortable.

      • Tara Dadd

        Have you reviewed the text yourself to determine its content? This topic has been sensationalized and overblown, in many cases by people who have not actually seen this book’s content and are misrepresenting the portions that might be considered objectionable.

        • Tara Dadd

          Sorry – my reply was aimed at Beth DeRoos, not Lance. Participating via mobile devices which is always challenging for me.

    • Sean Dennehy

      1) These aren’t fringe sex topics. They’re fairly mainstream at this point.

      2) You’d rather teens learn about this from the internet or porn sites? Because they’re going to learn it early regardless. A classroom setting is healthier and safer for teenagers to learn this.

    • Why? Because understanding how other people live helps one navigate in the world–whether or not you participate in auto racing, folk dancing, bondage, cross-dressing, bicycling, or gardening, to chose a few similar examples. Information DOES NOT lead to the behavior when it is presented calmly in an open and accurate way. ( I had several people ask me for help in the hardware stores where I worked: they were initially embarrassed about the purpose of the “heavy weight” they wanted to hang from hooks in the ceiling, but it was much easier for me to help them be *safe* after they provided me worth more of the details of the loads involved: “safe sex” in this case meant making sure the hardware would not fail, causing serious injury. Helping them did not make me want to go home and try these activities myself…)

  • You can’t just pick and choose what you get out of education. What’s next, censoring evolution & global warming?

    • Lance

      Unfortunately states that push creationism have already done this.

  • Sean Dennehy

    Topics like bondage are pretty mainstream topics in modern day. Teenagers are going to learn about these topics at 13 anyways. Wouldn’t it be better for them to learn this in a classroom setting, where correct information can be given, rather than learning about it on the internet from random people or from pornography?

  • sally

    It is ignorant to think that teenagers are not aware of oral sex and bondage. These things are mainstream concepts now and not allowing teenagers to learn about them in a safe setting where they can ask questions is doing a disservice to our children.

  • Whamadoodle

    Jeez! I agree with Ann Crosbie on everything, but for crying out loud, finish a sentence! On and on and on…

    • Whamadoodle

      The parent Asfia keeps asking, “what about gangs?” Well… that’s not the subject of the book!

      I think this is just a case of someone getting freaked out, and trying to spread their feelings to everyone else. Others have the option to opt out, as Ms. Crosbie mentions.

  • Al

    Scones? Really? Is the proponent of keeping the book really trying to equate scones with a sex-ed book?

    • I was trying to explain that the fact that the book was written for college students does not necessarily mean it is inappropriate for high school students.

      • Al

        That argument is a complete red herring. You wouldn’t give a scone to an infant – why? because an infant is developmentally incapable of digesting (quite literally) that food item. You wouldn’t give a skill-saw to a 4-year-old – why? because a 4-year-old is developmentally incapable of handling the tool (which was made for somebody else) in a safe and productive manner. There certainly are audiences other than the intended audience (college students) for which this material would be age/developmentally appropriate, but adolescents 5 years younger than the age of consent are not such an audience.

        • Mood_Indigo

          I agree. If one argument sticks to my craw from this discussion, it’s this one that you have demolished quite well.

        • The average student in our health education class is 14-16 years of age. As we know, students do not always wait until the age of consent to be sexually active. This is why instruction is required to law starting in Junior high. Parents have options but school districts have to flow the law in order to avoid expensive law suits. See – https://www.aclunc.org/news/parents-and-physicians-declare-victory-end-clovis-sex-education-lawsuit

      • shesa

        You should go back to school and get some training on how to talk on a public channel! 🙂 You were more of an entertainment then getting point across. I have no sides in the matter but you need more patience when dealing with people. Your family may think you are amazing the whole world cannot take what you come up with as the gospel. Learn to take some criticism. Seriously grow up!

  • Fay Nissenbaum

    The option to “opt out” of health ed class is no good choice because then these kids will not get contraceptive education – and contraceptive instruction and how girls need to voice their insistence that condoms be used IS the most important part of any health ed curriculum. All students should have instruction in contraception and STD prevention. The rest is softer “finding yourself” twaddle. If the book keeps some kids away from that basic educational goal, then this book is a polarizing element that should be replaced.

    • It is my sincere hope that, by modifying the text to remove information which will not be taught, more parents will feel comfortable having their student in class.

  • trite

    Might be nice to let Asfia Ahmed participate a little more, moderator.

    • shesa

      Moderator does not see the board in action over the years. She is probably thinking of this wonderful board is trying so hard and these dumb over protective parents are messing what the board is trying to do. So screw them. Moderator was completely on the board side. The other side was done for even before the discussion started. I think the moderator should do some HW before taking sides in such a open manner. I have so much respect for KQED but today they lost a lot of it for sure.

  • Ben Rawner

    Teenagers will find this information out. Teenagers can learn from the school or they can learn from the Internet. Having conversations about sexual issues is important. Would u rather a child learn from a porn site or from a health education professional?

    • qwerty

      I prefer my son learns basic sexual ed from school but explicit stuff like ‘bondage’ from internet. Just as I did. I don’t want to steal that away from him.

  • Mrs. Eccentric

    i’m 52 years old and grew up a few minutes north of Fremont in Castro Valley. The parents who think that their kids don’t need to know about these topics, and that their kids will not find out about prostitution, bondage, and etc. are just kidding themselves and dangerously naive about the region in which they live.

    Much better for kids to find out about these topics in a responsible environment, rather than on the street. steph

  • D.A.

    There’s a good article here with some screen shots of the book. http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2014/08/12/california_school_district_suspends_your_health_today_parents_call_sex_ed.html

    Much better for kids to get some of this information in an academic format *before* they need it in their real lives. I’m annoyed that yet again, there is this group of parents who want to prevent information from getting to all the districts kids. Pull your own kid out, as is allowed, if you want, but leave the book in place.

  • Root_Admin1

    The lady from the school district is hogging all the time even cutting off the moderator. ALmost seems like the school district is bullying the parent

    • Francesca Haliburton

      I agree she’s combative. Why?

      • I apologize if I came off as combative. We have had little opportunity to reply to accusations which are untrue.

        • trite

          Truly, you ran the show.

  • Erin Vaca

    I am more upset by the fact that my son will probably now have to use a ten- year old, out of date textbook than the prospect that he might learn what a vibrator is, or how to put on a condom. And what era do the protesters think we are living in anyway? Teens can download 50 Shades of Gray to their smart phones from the public library. The health teachers all recommended this text and I respect their judgement as to what to emphasize in class.

  • Helen Kokkol North

    It would be very difficult socially for teens to be ” excuses” from ” certain” sections. They would most likely be embarrassed to be sent out of the room.
    If it is a college text book, it is NOT “appropriate” for high school kids. Especially 9th grade kids.
    The problem is also that we aren’t addressing what kids are exposed to and how we filter that.
    High school kids are not college students and they are not adult either.

    ALSO…. Stop letting Ann run this conversation!

    • qwerty

      Yes, I too felt that Ann was running the conversation and was quite rude in general.
      When my son grows up, I can easily opt out my son for this class. But its socially ackward, and I can’t have my son not know something which is the talk of the school.
      If my son opts out, and half the class is talking about bondage sex fetishes… that is not cool. I better not have my son feel left out.
      I hope this book is put on hold for good.

    • My daughter has friends who allow their daughter to drive other students though it is not legal to do so. I do not allow my daughter to ride with this student. It is difficult. It is at times inconvenient and awkward but I am teaching my daughter our values. Being a parent is not always easy.

  • Andrea Allen

    As a young woman just a few years out of high school, I can say first hand that only when parents and adults make subjects taboo or naughty do kids and teens start doing these things in secret. It’s the “forbidden fruit.” It’s so much more beneficial to kids and teens health when they are taught clearly and honestly about these subjects. Although certain content in the book may not be focused on 14-16 year olds, these are things that when taught actually create a safer community of knowledgeable teens.

  • David

    kids in Freemont don’t stay in Freemont. the issue there is an issue for all of us.

    • Teri

      And the main reason kids in Fremont are dying to get out of Fremont? The stifling resistance to reality that wants to control and limit every aspect of their lives, as demonstrated by the ‘parents’ trying to prevent this book from being taught.

      I grew up in Fremont, and I know how desperate most of the kids are to leave that town. I wound up going back to live and teach, thinking it would be good to have some progressive voices in the community to try and shift things into the 21st century. Nope, Fremont ain’t having none of that.

      It took me ten years to decide to move away, 15 to decide to leave my job…all because this town wants to keep living in a fictional past and ignore reality. If they could build a physical wall to prevent the rest of the world out, they would.

  • Raymond

    Why aren’t there any students on this program discussing their thoughts and feelings about the textbook?

  • Bette

    About Asfia Ahmed
    Don’t be fooled by this woman. This is the beginning of the Talibanization of Fremont schools.

    • Root_Admin1

      OMG, is this how people in fremont respond to a vocal woman from another culture?!!

      • Mrs. Eccentric

        Root-Admin, i agree that bettepage’s comment is racist and inflammatory. It’s also laughable, as the USA has been having these types of fights over textbooks since the 1970’s (at least) but mostly provoked by fundamentalist caucasian, home grown Christians.

        While i agree that school districts should be responsive to parents, they also need to be accountable to the community at large – including state and federal governments. Public schools are provided by the overall community as a community-wide benefit.

        It’s also interesting to see that people who don’t want kids to learn about bondage, etc. are miffed that ‘my kids won’t learn about contraception’. Why on earth can’t you do so yourselves? There’s plenty of great info. online and at public libraries, and that way you can tailor the lessons as you see fit. If these parents’ concerns were simply for their own spawns’ delicate constitutions, you’d think this would be the obvious course of action.

      • llaney

        how do you know that bettepage is a Fremont resident?

    • Lance

      Such the troll post, this isn’t /B/.

    • Stuart Yee

      You win the award for Most Ignorant Thing Said.

  • Francesca Haliburton

    Anne responds to the parents in a defensive manner. She speaks of the educational code as if it’s a entity unto its self. Codes and regulations are made by the people for the people and if the people aren’t in agreement we need to change the curriculum. We have the option of deciding when our children learn certain aspects of sexuality. Not the government. We should be concerned about the process. Please don’t assume everyone’s child is doing the same thing your child is. And it’s not that I don’t believe the topic should not be discussed. But parents get to decide how these topics are framed.

    • llaney

      You are correct, the Ed Code could be changed. However, until that happens, FUSD has to be certain that the materials used do meet the requirements of the current Ed Code. Parents do have the option of deciding, and they can choose to have their child/ren opt out of the Sex Ed portion of the Health class.

      • Francesca Haliburton

        Parents also have the option to not send their children to a school that does not respond to their voice. The conversations need to be age appropriate and agreed upon on all sides.

        • llaney

          You are correct, Francesca — parents do have that option, to homeschool or to send their child to private school. Of course you know that the likelihood of ANY topic being “agreed upon on all sides” is very slim. Responding to a voice is not necessarily agreeing with that voice. In addition, FUSD has already indicated that, pending board approval, this book will not be used in 2014-15 and instead, kids will continue to learn from a book that is 10 years old and rife with inaccuracies and outdated information. Seems like a response, yes?

          • Francesca Haliburton

            I don’t see that as a response no. We need to keep having these conversations and making decisions as a community. I hate the idea of being bullied by government whose job it is to serve us all. And because we are a diverse population with diverse ideas, how about diverse answers to these questions. One size rarely fits all.

          • llaney

            Francesca — it is the school board trustee’s job to make the decisions. That is why they are elected. If you view that as being “bullied by government” I am not sure how to continue the conversation.

          • Francesca Haliburton

            First I have to say I am as liberal as anyone can be. Government has a place in society. The bullying I am speaking of is the fallacy of the “either or choice”.

        • MonkInSF

          The FUSD will still collect your property tax even if you decide to send your kids to private school. For the FUSD, that is good news. They will cheer if all Asian parents send the kids to private schools.

    • Most kids may NOT engage in sex when these classes are offered, but they still will need the information presented in order to understand the world around them, which is unavoidably diverse. Depriving your kids of accurate basic information does them a disservice, since the information DOES NOT translate into trying the behaviors. If you have done your job as a parent well, you need not worry about accurate, neutrally presented information as such making them into demons. That just will not happen if you have *already* done your job.

      • Francesca Haliburton

        Again it’s the parents right to frame the conversation. Not yours. It’s not my job to go into your home and advise your children on all the intricacies and details of sex, religion, family relationships, how to spend your money or how to treat your family. There are still jobs for the parents to perform. We don’t need government raising our children.

        • Francesca Haliburton

          And I never said you need to deprive them. But allow the parents to parent the child.

  • Stuart Yee

    The fact that the author states that the book was originally written for college students is not a statement taken out of context; rather that’s actually a pretty important fact. If you like scones, try this on for size- pants made for a 19 year old will seldom fit a 14 year old.

    Additionally, I remember very distinctly being a High School freshman. Speaking for myself and my friends in those days, I don’t think we had the maturity to constructively handle a discussion about bondage or legalization of prostitution.

    • As I explained, not all material in the book would be discussed in class.

      • Stuart Yee

        That’s fine. I’m just giving a perspective based how myself and my immediate peers would have reacted to material in this book. I have no idea how you can use that information, but something to consider.

        But your reply raises a question, if not all material can be discussed in class, why use this book? Why not use one that has far less provocative material?

      • shesa

        so why change the old book?

    • Jack Barry

      The scones analogy was completely inane blabbering by the board member. While I was listening to that, the first thought that came to my mind was idiots are running our school board! I hate using names, but that was a really bad analogy for her to use.

      • Steven

        Totally agree. The scones analog made was complete blabbering. How about this analogy … I buy dog food for my dog. You can certaintly eat it also (but I wouldn’t recommend it)

  • trite

    Too bad that the moderator was not more impartial about allocation of time.

    • Jack Barry

      It came off like the moderator favored the school board member’s argument.

      • trite

        Yes, it did.

    • quifzan

      Indeed. Even her questions were loaded in favor of the the school board member. I cringed when she spoke about ‘denialism’ and conservative ‘Asian Americans’.

      This is why Dr. Krasny should never take a break. 🙂

  • commonsense

    Kids in high school, especially 14 yrs old do not need to be taught about bondage and other types of sex acts. Are we teaching them how to start experimenting?? Sex ed is about about health!! This means what intercourse is, how the eggs are fertilized, stds, condoms, and probably rape issues like no means no. It does not mean how to use a vibrator, how to use bondage and sexual positions. Are we going to give them the Joys of Sex book too? And parents who dont have basic skills to put controls for things like porn on phones and computers by now are idiots. If this book is used, you’ll see high school pregnancy increase for sure at this high school. College books have no business being in 14yr old students hands.

    • D.A.

      No teacher is going to be giving step by step instructions on bondage and sexual positions. This kind of fear-mongering statement is what *really* irritates me about the book’s opponents. And studies pretty clearly show that areas with comprehensive sex education have far *lower* teen pregnancy rates than those with little or no sex ed, or those who rely on “abstinence only.”

    • Why not? We offer college-level math and English…Learning about Fascism in school did not make me into a Mussolini or a Hitler; learning about Communism did not make me a communist; learning about racism did not make me into a racist. Similarly, learning abut homosexuality, bondage, and contraception–as an adult, sadly, because I never was offered any useful information in my public high school–did not make me gay, or a transvestite, or into a sex maniac. And your assertion about increasing pregnancy rates is incorrect: comprehensive sex education DECREASES pregnancy rates among teenagers…

      • Teri

        The “concerned community members” in Fremont have curtailed access to college-level materials in the AP English Lit curriculum as well.

  • llaney

    I am curious as to why many parents are OK with using college-level textbooks for AP English, AP Calculus and AP History classes — maybe this class should be renamed AP Health — bet parents would rush to have their kid enrolled in that!!!

    • Stuart Yee

      Outside of the fact that AP Calculus seldom excites students the way sex does, it’s worth a shot!

    • Teri

      Um…if you knew Fremont, you’d know that they’ve also rejected perfectly legitimate, critically acclaimed, beautifully written books for AP English Lit because a handful of overzealous conservative parents (or even childless moralizing “activists” from neighboring towns) opposed it. This is a particular dysfunction of THIS community.

      • llaney

        Heh, I was being facetious, but that is very true, Teri…Bastard Out of Carolina…Angels in America…don’t get me started.

        • Teri

          Believe me, as the teacher who submitted those books repeatedly, I am still furious at FUSD’s cowardice.

      • Nina
    • shesa

      This is such a great idea. Totally agreed. If the text book is college material why not name it AP Health! Why the board did not think of that 😀

    • Nina

      AP classes are only offered to a group of advanced students at higher grade level such as 11th or 12th grade. I do not believe they are offered to general student body at 9th grade.

  • Michelle

    This 30 minutes were completely out of hand. and I blame the host for not being able to control the whole situation. The host needs to do a better job than just allowing bullying keep going on and on. Ann was not only rude to the other woman, she was rude to the listener who dialed in. what a disastrous show! I want Michael back.

    • Mary Biggs

      I am Catholic and raised my sons Catholic. I prefer my 9th grade son not to
      see the details in the book on sex toys, bondage, and whether or not to legalize prostitution.

      But, I also want my son to learn ALL of the CA Content Standards
      for 9th – 12th grade health, and so I will tolerate my
      son’s exposure to “too much” information in order for him to learn about his
      body, how it works, and how to properly care for it.

      Our goal should be to present the CA Health Standards to as many 9th
      grade students as possible.

      The School District should not be in the business of “chasing” students away from health class, by using a textbook that many parents object to because it contains “more” than the CA Health Standards.

      The reality is that if this controversial health book is placed upon 9th grade student desks the first day of school, more parents in Fremont than ever before will pull their children out of health class altogether.

      Last week, I sent an email to Dr. Morris & the School Board, encouraging them to “compromise” and simply “cut” out the unnecessary information from the book, and basically try and make the book “more”
      age appropriate.

      We are an intelligent community, and for the benefit of our children, we can, and absolutely should, come up with a current and age-appropriate health & Sex Ed book for 9th graders, so that as many of our children in Fremont as possible will take health class and learn the CA Content Standards for health.

      • llaney

        Oh Mary — do you think that FUSD and the school board has not spent a significant amount of time searching for another current and age-appropriate Health and Sex Ed book? I doubt that they just wrote the titles of a bunch of books on slips of paper, tossed them in a hat and did a random drawing that resulted in selecting this book.

        I was also raised Catholic, and I appreciate that my personal choice of religion would have no effect on what my kids learned in public school. If I wanted them to have a doctrine-approved education, they would have been enrolled in parochial school.

        It is my understanding that FUSD is indeed investigating the possibility of having the Sex Ed portion of this textbook revised to remove some of the topics that some parents have objected to. That will take time, and money, so for now it appears that Fremont 9th graders will learn about Health and Sex Ed as it was ten years ago, without updated and accurate information, from a textbook that does not meet the California Education Code standards.

        • Mary Biggs

          FUSD Health Teachers currently use an approved supplemental state-wide curriculum called FLASH to instruct our 9th graders on Sex Ed. They do not use the outdated book to teach Sex Ed. Obviously, the out-dated book currently used needs to be replaced. But realize, these past years, FUSD Health Teachers have been teaching CA Content Standards for 9th-12th grade Health (standards updated 2008) by using supplemental materials. This new Health Textbook will allow FUSD Health Teachers to do away with using supplemental materials they’ve had to use up until now to be adherent to Ed Code and to present all the CA Content Standards.

          FUSD has basically uncovered a unique business opportunity for textbook publishers . .and that is to come up with a current, age-appropriate high school health textbook that contains all of the CA Content Standards and is compliant with Ed Code.

          FUSD is not the only district in CA in need of new 9th grade health textbooks. So this discussion is very necessary and I hope it will result in the publication of a current, age-appropriate, CA Content Standard & Ed Code compliant health textbook that all school districts in CA can eventually use.

          Even Asfia is not challenging the current CA Content Standards for 9th – 12th grade. She is simply asking the School District to find a book that contains all the CA Content Standards but not the additional controversial topics like sex toys, bondage, etc. Her request is reasonable. In the meantime, FUSD Health teachers will continue to teach the CA Content Standards for 9th-12th grade health to our students, unfortunately using the out-dated book plus supplemental materials.

          I do agree with Asfia that the Mental Health Chapter does not address high school mental health issues. Sadly there is only one short page on suicide . . and it is not geared towards young teens, listing no coping strategies on how to deal with teen suicidal thoughts . . . . or how to deal with peer pressure and bullying that occurs in high school. I pointed this out at the June 16th book review meeting and even the FUSD Health Teacher agreed that the new book is lacking here and that teachers spend considerable more time in class discussing teen suicidal thoughts, than the new health book mentions.

          Likewise, the FUSD Health Teachers admitted at the June 16th meeting that the two short paragraphs about abstinence in the new health book are not adequate. FUSD Health Teachers say they spend more time in class verbally explaining that abstinence is the best way to avoid pregnancy and STDs.

          In summary, to properly present Health & Sex Ed, there has to be an appropriate combination of teacher lecture and current textbook. Again we need to stay focused on the children, and adopt textbooks that will ensure as many children as possible take this important class, rather than less children. I mentioned my Catholic faith simply to note that even those of us with (sexually) conservative upbringing are not against educating and providing our children the latest information they need to know to lead a safe, healthy life.

          Thank you for your comments.

        • Mary Biggs

          Please unsubscribe my email address from Disqus

          I’ve completed my discussion on the topic.

          thank you

      • There is no way to better equip your son to help defend himself–and others–against manipulative attempts to engage him in undesirable behaviors than to teach him about them. This includes sex slavery, rape, prostitution, bondage, and other practices used to enslave people–some of whom might be his friends and classmates. Knowledge does not equal participation.

  • ChatterG

    News flash, 14 year olds hang out with 15-17 year olds.

    S&M rips, Bondage chain connected earrings with matching leather anklets-bracelets and Pink displayed prominently for the strap, tats depicting pleasurable pain.

    These are the bluejeans and tee shirts of this generation’s kids. And how many of these parents have such toys themselves either displayed openly or Yea, right hidden in drawers and closets that their child would never go through?

    All the stupid parents in Fremont are actually arguing is that 14 is too young to be armed beforehand with correct knowledge of that which they already inundated with daily. Though the only message coming through due to the lack of complete information is that everyone does it because it feels great but my folks just don’t want me to have any fun.

  • Mood_Indigo

    Neither Ms. Ahmed not Ms. Crosbie represented their side of the argument well. Ms. Ahmed’s combativeness played up to negative stereotypes of a section of the immigrant community, and Ms. Crosbie’s supercilious and condescending tone lived up to the stereotype of the education bureaucracy as an arrogant, arbitrary body acting on some informal political agenda of the board and administration and only responding to public pressure under duress.

    I appreciate points on both sides but, on balance, have more sympathy for Ms. Ahmed’s position. I confess I have not read this specific book, but if an author says that the primary audience of the book is college students (something that Ms. Crosbie did not dispute), then they need to find another book. Does one seriously expect the author to recommend that his book sales be reduced by withdrawing it from the HS curriculum? My impression (admittedly superficial) is that the book under review in this program is not age-appropriate.

    I have no patience with folks making this lazy argument that topics such fetish and bondage are better learned in class than on internet or playground. This is such a bogus argument. Should we also discuss bestiality and pedophilia in the ninth grade students because that’s something kids can learn on the internet? My experience is that folks who take this position also take little interest in their kid’s academic development and fully leave to the “professionals” in the public school system to educate their kids.

    I have limited trust in the public school system where my two kids are being educated. I just took my 10-year old son for a two-evening, father-son, sex-ed seminar conducted by Stanford Hospital. It’s just not the content, but the tone of the material and the presentation that is very important when it comes to sex ed. My son learned a lot in two evenings, along with getting a couple of books that were (here is the important thing) focused on pre-teens. The material (and the books) was surprisingly detailed/graphic but the it was presented with remarkable skill in an age-appropriate manner.

    I look forward to having my daughter taking a similar seminar when she turns ten. And, oh, I’m a south Asian immigrant.

    • Tara Dadd

      You state early in your comment that you have not read the book. That makes it hard for me to see your input as relevant or informed. You go on to say that you have “limited trust in the public school system.” Without intent to be argumentative or inflammatory, I wonder how much you have chosen to impact your (our) school system via your involvement as a parent and community member.

    • Clearly you are an invested parent who has been looking out for your child’s education. We are trying to provide this same information to students whose parents are disconnected, uncomfortable or ill equipped to talk about this topic with their children. If some parents do not want this information taught in school than I respect their option to make this informed decision. But they don’t get to choose for other parents and dictate what education those children receive. This is one of the few standards where parents can actually make a choice for their child. No one is arguing that because students are required to have so many years of English to graduate from high school – with no option to opt out if you don’t like the material – that the state is over-reaching. Yet when it come to health we are accused of being unfair.

  • Jack Barry

    I enjoyed the woman who was a teacher named Carol who called in. She
    made good points and right after the host hung up on her, all Ann did
    was discredit her saying she was uncredited and her kids never went to
    Fremont. The host never gave Carol a chance to respond back.
    Regardless, it was character assassination by Ann and didn’t address any
    of the valid points Carol brought up. Shame on the F U S D for having
    someone so rude and incompetent representing them on this forum.

    • trite

      And shame on the “moderator.”

    • Francesca Haliburton

      The moderator has limits on time. But this Anne was a bit of a bully. There is no need for that in public service.

      • llaney

        You use the term “bully” a lot, Francesca. Having a different opinion about something does not make someone a bully. Being assertive and decisive does not make one a bully. A public servant doing the job they were elected to do does not constitute a bully. I wonder why you see things that way?

    • Teri

      Carol is a known agitator who makes false claims of being a “Fremont teacher and parent” when she is not.

      • Sally

        I don’t know her but she didn’t say she was, she said she was on a FUSD committee or board.

        • Teri

          She likes to say she’s a teacher and parent, and then she says she’s from Fremont, to create the impression that she’s got a stake in this when she doesn’t. Believe me, she’s well known at board meetings.

  • Kay

    While conservatives (or traditionalist) and liberals (or progressives) see each other as the adversary, there is clearly other forces that are playing. For example, having doctors talk to children and give them vaccines without parental knowledge is clearly being pushed by the industry who profits from vaccines in the garb of public health. I think the business lobbied state taking over some basic parenting should be a cause of concern for anyone despite where they stand in the political spectrum. Last check the outcomes were childhood obesity, autism, auto-immune disorders in the name of fast food, public health etc.

  • shesa

    I was hearing the discussing and what caught my attention is that, the member of the school board says something in lines of “All material in the book will not be covered” So they are aware that all the material in the book is not appropriate. So why try to change when they know there are issues with the book. Just use the old one. Also when a book is being changed there should be an opportunity for review by all concerned. If it will be use in fall 2014, parents should get their hands on the copy in 2013. You need a year to plan this stuff. It seems like there was some activity that happened way before every one got involved. Board probably is trying to cover their activities. If you want to go ahead and teach kids beyond what is their age required why not do it in math or english there no one wants to make changes because of financial issues. Wonder how that did not affect this situation. Like others have said information is available every where so why not in school? LOL This is so hilarious. Kids are not in school enough to finish material required for the state standards but on a specific class they want to go ahead. The lady from the board could learn to talk more respectful for sure. The analogies that she was using was cracking me up. I think she is frustrated that the whole world is not listening to the boards awesome ideas – change health books even if there is no money in the school but screw reading, math! If the board learns to talk a little more civil I think they could reach more audience.

  • Tony Luan

    This Ann Crosbie is SO RUDE! Feel sorry for parents and students in Fremont.

  • Sally

    Ann compared adult and teen health guidelines to scones, that both a daughter and father could eat the same scones. I was reading the comments below and that’s like saying it would be appropriate for both a daughter and father to wear the same string bikini to public school. Or if all the students wore string bikinis to school, would that be appropriate? No it wouldn’t. Even though a 14 year
    old may get in an adult situation such as drinking alcohol or becoming pregnant
    – the health guidelines and information are different than for an adult. Such as legal age, peer pressure, how it
    affects your life, and involving parents.

  • Steven

    To Ann Crosbie

    I am a FUSD parent and voter. Since school board members are elected officials, you have a responsibility to represent and listen to community (e.g. parental) concerns.

    Your comments on KQED were shameful and show woeful lack of leadership because it appears you do not respect other people’s opinions.

    I wonder why you could not simply say, “Parents and the community raised valid concerns, and because of that, we are reviewing and asking the publisher to make changes to the proposed text. We thank parents and the community for showing concern and providing feedback.”

    Following State Ed Code does not meet all the requirements and responsibilities of a school board member. The school board must represent the interests and needs of parents, students, school staff, and the community, while at the same time follow State and Federal guidelines/requirements/laws. Yes, indeed, it is an important responsibility. That is why we elect school board members and hold them to very high standards.

    The school board should not be involved in debating and attacking parental/community concerns. The board should weigh everyone’s concerns and make balanced decisions. No one side is right, but your comments on KQED show that you do not respect the parents who have concerns about the proposed text. Why must you be so defensive about the proposed text? You have a responsibility to listen to all your constituents. It is inappropriate for a school board member to speak out in a manner in which you did on KQED.

  • Julie

    Wow! I’ve never read such ‘dialogue’ before – so many heated and even hateful comments, by adults nonetheless; and so much misinformation and little listening!
    I think if my local school district had (or hopefully, will have second time around) followed professional and inclusive protocols and if the district had/will follow the law, then we wouldn’t/won’t be embroiled in such a mess.

    CA ED Code 51931(b) states comprehensive sexual health education (CSHE) is NOT required at all. CA ED Code 51933 states IF districts choose to teach CSHE, the district must follow certain mandatory requirements like the materials must be age appropriate and the teaching must include the infant surrender law. Under CA ED Code 51931(d), CA districts are required to teach, at least once in high school, an HIV/STD prevention education; requirements are in CA ED Code 51934.

    I hope the district will carefully consider the limitless implications of the electronic copy of the textbook each student has been slated to receive. Specialized teacher training with a potentially controversial textbook and a related Co-Ed culturally diverse population might limit future issues. Lastly, the curricular substitution for the opt-out students, for both part or all of the health course, needs to be carefully planned out in advance.

  • Julie

    Okay, I did this in reverse. I read the comments first, made my own comment, and then I listened to the forum. Disclaimer, I’m a Fremont parent of a 9th grader. Nonetheless, sorry, KQED, but this has got to be, hands down, the worst Forum show I have ever listed to and I’m a regular listener, several times a week. I know this is an anomaly for your great forum shows, so I’ll still be a faithful listener. Thank-you for making my future school board voting much easier!

    • Nina

      Me too. Now I know whom we should not vote for next time.

  • David

    It’s pure interest group politics. I have an interest in raising a moral son who respects the religion our family has practiced for the 2000 years before FUSD came along. Some people in San Francisco have an interest eroding the values of my children to satisfy their liberal constituents and the big money leftists who have their own twisted vision of what America should be. The Democratic Party, who runs the show in CA because you people keep voting for them, will side with the leftists. They win, you lose, and if you don’t like it you can pay $20,000 per year (plus the public school money you pay every year) to send your kid to a religious school. And one generation later the debate is about whether an even sicker book should be given to our grandchildren.

  • David

    I just had my post deleted that was anti – this textbook. Even what you are seeing on this topic is controlled by people who want to push this material on our kids. We can’t even have a free discussion.

  • David

    It’s pure interest group politics. I have an interest in raising a moral son who respects the religion our family has practiced for the 2000 years before FUSD came along. Some people in San Francisco have an interest eroding the values of my children to satisfy their liberal constituents and the big money leftist who have their own vision of what America should be. The Democratic Party, who runs the show in CA because you people keep voting for them, will side with the leftists. They win, you lose, and if you don’t like it you can pay $20,000 per year (plus the public school money you pay every year) to send your kid to a religious school.

  • Nina

    Let me tell you something funny. I am a Fremont parent with two boys. Yesterday I was telling my 12 year old son he is going to use a college textbook for sex education at ninth grade with some adult contents which are not targeted for high school students. He screamed, laughed and run away. Moments later, his friend, also a 12 year old boy came over to our house to play. I heard he was joking with his friend ” we are going to use a college sex ed book in ninth grade. No wonder Fremont is so perverted!”
    Kids are very sensitive to sex education contents. A 14 year old is not adult yet. They should use their age appropriate text book instead of adult sex ed book. Even AP English or AP Math are only offered to advanced students at higher grade level such as 11th or 12th grade. I do not think any school offer AP classes to entire 9th grade kids. They can not digest it yet.
    I am a big fan of “FORUM” and Michael Krasny. But I was very disappointed with this KQED show. Ann Crosbie run the entire show. The moderator even labeled Fremont parents as “conservative Asian parents”. It is very inappropriate, and not professional.

  • Jonnie

    Those two cackling hens gave me a headache!

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