(Courtesy SF Mime Troupe)

The San Francisco Mime Troupe started as an experimental actors’ workshop in 1959. Since then, it has become a Bay Area institution, tackling social issues with its satire and pop culture spoofs. The latest production, “Ripple Effect,” casts a critical eye on the tech boom and class warfare as it follows three characters: an activist, an immigrant and a tech worker. The troupe talks about its satirical comedy and 55 years in San Francisco.

Guests:
Velina Brown, actor with the San Francisco Mime Troupe
Michael Gene Sullivan, actor, director and resident playwright with the San Francisco Mime Troupe
Keiko Shimosato Carreiro, actor, director and designer with the San Francisco Mime Troupe

  • Another Mike

    In my experience, there seems to be considerable overlap between immigrants and tech workers.

  • Chemist150

    Back in ’98 when I moved here, I had gotten what I thought was a decent paying job paying way more than I could in my home state but found quickly that I could not afford much of the area. Looking at SF then, it was attainable but I found that many surrounding areas have much to offer. SF lost its appeal on many counts. Getting stuck in a traffic jam every time I went there due to a parade or protest is not worth it. Living there at the expense is not worth it. I looked at an apartment in SF and the owner lived in a broom closet and I would have been isolated to a 10’x12’ room for over twice what I paid for an full apartment in my home state. I don’t get the mentality. It’s not worth it, other areas have as much to offer at affordable prices.

    Solve the problems of SF by leaving. It truly is that simple. With no demand, it’ll become what you’re seeking. It’s the idealized SF that inhabits your mind that holds you back from discovering the world.

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