(Greenbelt Alliance/Flickr)

Marin County is currently designated as an urban community by the state, requiring it to build new housing at the same density as cities like San Francisco. But under legislation approved recently by the state Assembly, the county would be re-designated as suburban, reducing the housing mandate from 30 to 20 units per acre for future developments. The bill’s author, San Rafael Assembly Member Marc Levine, says it would lead to smarter growth more in-character with the county’s rural nature. But critics say it would reduce affordable housing requirements at a time when Marin hasn’t met existing ones. We talk about the proposal, which now heads to the state Senate.

Guests:
Marc Levine, assemblyman for District 10 which covers Marin County and Southern Sonoma County
David Kunhardt, CEO of SolEd Benefit Corp. and founder and steering committee member of the Coalition for a Livable Marin

  • Luke Teyssier

    “critics say it would reduce affordable housing requirements…” High density housing is NOT affordable housing. They are completely separate issues. Plan Bay Area (The blueprint for Manhattan style density all over the Bay Area) itself even says that urbanizing Marin will make it less affordable. Regional Urbanization is NOT a plan for affordable housing. It’s a play that will make some very well connected dive-by high density housing developers wealthy building stack and pack housing, while the rest of us pick up the tab for decades.

    What the pro-urbanization advocates won’t tell you is that the Regional Housing Needs Assessment quota system only counts new, high-density developments near freeways and major transit areas. It doesn’t count assisted living complexes (only one kitchen), infill / “mother in law” units only count as 1/4 of a unit, and neither do refurbishments and remodels. They only want to see new grand-scale growth, not an efficient and effective reuse of existing structures and back lots.

    How can it be OK for un-elected, out of touch, regional agencies like ABAG dictate how and where we can live? How can it be OK to dictate that all new affordable housing be located near traffic noise and pollution, and encourage it to be allowed in flood zones, environmentally sensitive areas, on the easement for freight trains, and other marginal lots?

    Who benefits? It’s sure not the most vulnerable members of our society. And it’s not society as a whole either. Not the county. Not the average resident.

    It’s time for out-of-touch, un-responsive, un-elected regional agencies to stop trying to dictate to the rest of us where and how we can live.

    • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

      You said, “It’s time for out-of-touch, un-responsive, un-elected regional agencies to stop trying to dictate to the rest of us where and how we can live.”

      You can stop worrying, we always have had local control and I suspect we always will. Can you show me one housing element, housing project that was approved by any group other that our local town councils and local governmental bodies? Just one, that is all I’m asking for.

      It is your group that wants our supervisors to interfere with town governments…

      Just show me one luke

      • Luke Teyssier

        J. Fishbob – please take a look at “How to Disagree” by Paul Graham
        http://www.paulgraham.com/disagree.html
        When you have a DH4 Counter-Argument or better, I would be happy to engage you in a candid discussion.

        • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

          Perhaps you might not reply until you stop all the fear mongering and repeated lies.

          If our community is to have a decent conversation you need to stop the Fox News Sensationalism and understand and discuss the issues based on facts.

          I have sat in meetings with you, and the first thing you did was start with an ad hominem attack on me. Based on your behaviors I think you need to follow your own advice and reread “How to Disagree”…

  • Karen Westmont

    The pitch for this segment contradicts facts because jurisdictions are never ‘required to build’. Instead, by law every jurisdiction must plan for its own growth, rural areas too: no jurisdiction can close its doors and push its growth onto its neighbors.

    A smart rural county would plan for density in some areas because public services cost less over shorter distances. Surely Marin County does not want to be
    fiscally and environmentally irresponsible by stringing more houses along rural
    roads in wildfire zones?

    Marin County now plans to spend its land more for jobs than for housing, thereby taking jobs and tax base from other counties. (Marin’s jobs:housing now at 1-to-1 is
    planned for 1.09-to-1.) Funny thing, every Bay Area county but Santa Clara wants to under-provide housing by spending its land for jobs instead. Hmm. Wonder
    why house prices are squeezed?

  • Karen Westmont

    Contrary to some views, ABAG is elected with Marin’s county supervisors and city council members on ABAG’s board. RHNA counts any full unit as a full unit, regardless of location. But agreed that density does not equate to affordability: here state law is unfounded. Land price reflects the widest gap between what the market will sell compared to the construction cost given the codes: land that allows 20 units might be used for 3 houses, were that the most profitable for someone.

    • Luke Teyssier

      This is parsing and semantics: “Full Unit” must include a kitchen. Senior and assisted living units, cited on the show as an example of successful high density housing, with everything but a full kitchen don’t count. There are many more examples of misleading rhetoric in the ABAG/MTC/TAM pro-urbanziation arguments.

      Take a look at the IMBY solution as just one way to solve the need for affordable housing in Marin:
      http://www.communityventurepartners.org/#!the-imby-solution/c1473

      • Another Mike

        Most senior housing allows seniors to live independently. Only “assisted living” units, nursing home, and dementia wards lack kitchens.

      • Luke Teyssier

        At “The Redwoods” cited on the show, there are (according them) 149 Apartments with Kitchens, 90 assisted living, and “maybe 100 total” more in Personal Care and Health Care units, on 10 acres. However, since only the apartments count (only they have a full kitchen) ABAG/MTC/TAM/RHNA density would be 14.9 units/acre. And that’s how they do it. By ABAG rules, The Redwoods is a low density housing development. Only 149 out of 339 units would count towards the quota. So, the high-density developer and the county are actually dis-incentivized to build a full needs community like The Redwoods instead of stack and pack housing at minimum floor sizes of 220 square feet (slightly larger than a one car garage).

    • Stephen Nestel

      Oh please. ABAG is virtually unelected and unaccountable. Plan Bay Area was approved by the “executive committee” not even the full assembly of 101 Bay Area cities. Most citizens were completely unrepresented in that vote. For a plan the magnitude of Plan Bay Area which radically impacts 8 or 9 million people and TRILLIONS of dollars of real estate development, it should have be a vote of the people. Some, want “Soviet Style” governance by panels of administrators and special appointees. The rest of us want democracy.

    • Kevin Moore

      Susan Adams won’t be on the ABAG board again. We booted her.

  • Sanfordia113

    Michael Krasney, please probe the issue of developer money (both private and allegedly “non-profit”) and the influence they exert on ABAG politicians.

    As a current San Francisco resident who grew up in Marin County for a few years (as well as LA, Paris, Tokyo, Copenhagen, Palo Alto, etc.), I feel that Marin, Sonoma, Napa, and Santa Cruz Counties should become “re-ruralized,” if anything. The industrial/high-density counties can and should increase population density towards levels seen in other world-class cities. Urban living is a great experience. Particularly when bicycle access to nearby rural landscapes is possible. With these ABAG developers who have pushing to increase Marin Population from an essentially rural/suburban county in the 70’s to their vision of Hong Kong today should be vehemently opposed. I would be willing to pay an additional $5 per year parcel tax to fund the purchase of land in Marin, Napa, Sonoma and Santa Cruz to permanently turn these parcels into organic cow/goat farms. The Buck/San Francisco Foundation should prioritize this effort.

  • Another Mike

    Marin County’s population density is only 476 people per square mile, less than the density of 500 people per square mile that the Census considers the minimum for a suburban area. Any one who drives through Marin will notice the wilderness and farming activities.

    • Another Mike

      To be clear — considering population density, Marin is a rural county.

    • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

      Most people see the 101 corridor, which is more urban and dense. That was how Marin was designed, keep housing in our transportation corridors, save open space, we should continue that tradition if we want to keep Marin and all its beauty. Marin is rural in West Marin, we planned it that way.

      • Kevin Moore

        “We planned it that way”. Now you’re being silly. We?
        When did you move to Marin? What part of Marin’s planning did you help with? Were you there to help get rid of Marincello?

        You strike me more of a “I never saw a development I didn’t like” kind of guy. Developers must love you.

        • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

          There you go again, telling silly stories… Don’t tell me you can’t figure out who the “we” is… come on Kevin… work on that.

          • Kevin Moore

            Just pointing out you had nothing to do with preserving Marin. All I have ever seen you do is push for more development and try to sweep any issues under the table.

            Time to get serious and come up with ideas. Measure the resources and fix the areas we come up short.

            Water shortage silly? Only in your mind.
            Most people take it seriously.

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            Storage Shortage, if you keep saying water shortage you will be seeking solutions for the wrong set of problems, let’s be clear about the PROBLEM.

            We DON”T have a water shortage problem (Marin Floods), we have a storage problem, so let’s talk about way to increase storage and stop with the mischaracterization of the issue.

            Deal?

          • Kevin Moore

            If we had more rain this year, we would have more than enough storage.

            Lack of rain combined with lack of storage = shortage.
            You’re cracking me up with your silly evaluation.

            Last year you were hung up on flush toilets.

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            And here I thought you want to look at facts and solutions.

            What I’m hung up on is people using potable water to flush their poop into a sewer system, pretty insane if you ask me, especially when those same people turn around and cry about a false water shortage… are they really that stupid as to not understand the problem and the alternative solutions available to them to solve the problem.

            On one hand they complain about government’s top down tactics and then want government to solve their problems. What’s it gonna be Alfie, you can’t have both.

  • Ben Rawner

    All counties right next to San Fransisco County should be considered urban. If this bill passes it would only aid those who do not want any new public housing in Marin County. All adjacent counties (Oakland, San Mateo, and others have been adjusting). Marin-ers are just elitist and would rather keep poor people out.

    • Kevin Moore

      This isn’t Robin Hood, it is “Housing Bubble 2 – The Urban Overbuild”

      We lack the transportation and water resources to take on a large population. The Bay Area voted to not extend BART into Marin when San Mateo dropped out. That wasn’t a Marin choice.

      Do you read at all or just take pot shots are Marin? Read Plan Bay Area. The largest group of housing it recommends building in Marin is “above average income” housing.

      • Kevin Moore

        “would rather keep poor people out”

        The Larkspur Station Area Plan wants to add 920 housing units to the area. For existing apartments at Larkspur Landing, market rate for a 2 bedroom apartment is $2900 to $3375. (I called 2 weeks ago.) It takes a household income of about $120,000 to afford that rent.

        So tell me how they will work the magic to make new apartments below market rate? For the most part, they won’t. It will just be a good deal for developers to build, sell, and count the cash.

      • Kevin Moore

        I get tired of people parroting the same old sound bites.
        “Where will policemen, Firemen, and teachers live?”

        The AVERAGE FIREMEN in San Rafael makes $93,000 plus benefits. Retire at 55 (if they make it that long, physical job). They are not exactly paupers. My point is not to pick on firemen, but to point out people repeat phrases without any thought to what they are saying. Plus, no one has told me of a preference by firemen to live in urban apartments vs living in suburban single family houses. With 24 hour shifts, there are few commute days in the month.

  • William Walker

    Marin wants its cake and eats it too. If Marin changes its designation from urban to suburban, then it should lose its federal funding for programs such as public transit that it runs for the working class to get to and from work. You cannot refuse to build housing for the workers but beg for every other subsidy government has to offer. Marin is urban.

    • Sanfordia113

      This would be a great result! The less people that live in the North Bay and Santa Cruz, the better it is for the 90% majority of residents in the greater Bay Area central counties.

    • Another Mike

      Most of the public transit from Marin to SF is funded by motorists paying tolls on the GG Bridge.

      • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

        And those motorist still moan and groan about traffic, I guess complaining about oneself is useless. Guess they can’t see the irony.

  • rhuberry

    Where will the water come from with all the new development this region seems to want? Never any discussion of that. Marin often is stretched as it is with the capacity to provide enough water for its current residents.

  • Stephen Nestel

    The citizens of Marin will fight back. Is ABAG crazy? We have been fighting for open space and human scale neighborhoods for decades. We lead the way for modern environmental movement in the early 1960s and created the GGNRA. We recognize this effort by greedy developers to greenwash their high density plans to urbanize Marin . See the Larkspur Rebellion here: http://youtu.be/XwyrJWiONjo

    • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

      Are you the same Stephen Nestel that worked on Tea Party TV videos with Steve Kemp?

      Don’t they tell stories about Agenda 21 and the big boogie man coming to take away your house and cars? Do you really believe that conspiracy theory stuff.

  • Luke Teyssier

    I have sat with David Kunhart in several meetings where he strongly advocated for high density housing (not affordable housing – high-density urbanization) using any and all arguments at hand whether they were based in fact or not. He is quite literally a poster-child for high-density urbanization in Marin (Featured in a county sponsored video advocating high-density).

    David Kunardt has several properties in Marin. How many of them
    would directly benefit from the urbanization that he advocating? KQED
    should screen its guests better.

    High Density is not affordable housing. Any attempt to tie the two is purely a smoke screen designed to silence reasoned and thoughtful debate. WinCup, for example, is not about affordable housing: Out of 180 units, only 8 are designated for income lower than the average income of San Rafael. How is this a justification for giving high-density developers exceptions to environmental, wetlands, runoff, wildlife habitat, coastlines, height, set-back, parking, water, sewage, and other requirements, while in many cases giving immense tax breaks not available to small builders providing, in many cases more suitable options for affordable living? There are many better ways to provide for our most vulnerable residents.

    For example, take a look at the “IMBY” solution. Watch the slide show for information about why the ABAG claims are completely misleading:

    http://www.communityventurepartners.org/#!the-imby-solution/c1473

    (If the link gets stripped out, google “Bob Silvestri IMBY”)

    Marin deserves better than to be strip-mined by high-density drive-by developers.

    • Kevin Moore

      Water
      At a recent Marin Municipal Water District meeting, we were told the current plan goes from 2010 to 2015. They are about to revise it. So far, all of the housing units added in the 2007 to 2014 cycle are not accounted for. This last cycle added a lot of housing.

      Southern Marin gets all water from rain trapped in reservoirs.
      Northern Marin gets most water piped in from Sonoma. Sonoma nearly had mandatory water rationing in 2009. Also, Sonoma is expanding a a high rate. It will be interesting to see what happens when Sonoma runs out of water and the lease to supply Marin comes up.

      • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

        We don’t have a water shortage, we have a storage shortage. So you can stop that silly talk right now.

        • Kevin Moore

          Glad you can admit we have a shortage.

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            But a storage shortage can be fixed… can you admit that or will you just keep up with more silly talk?

          • Kevin Moore

            I’m serious, you’re the one who is shrugging off issues, like water supply. Glad you finally woke up to the fact we need to make sure we don’t overbuild the water supply.

            We don’t have the Sacramento river flowing through Marin where we can tap off more water and trap it in a bigger reservoir. We have a few mountains to collect rainfall from.

            You forget that we can’t trap all of the water without killing off the salmon spawning grounds.

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            Kevin, get real, more water flows into the bay, we need to have distributive capture systems that serves. No one, especially me plan to take water from Salmon, but I would bet Ross valley would be damn happy if we could help solve their flooding problem.

            You really need to stop parroting the silliness of the NIMBYs, they are too easily proven wrong.

          • Kevin Moore

            Glad you are looking at the issues instead of sticking your head in the sand and pretending they are non issues.

            You have proved nothing, just put up a suggested improvement to our water shortage. Show me plans and funding to put in the water catch system.

            You still haven’t addressed the needs of the north bay, which is not served by the MMWD system to the south.

            Speaking of parrots, you could use one or an eye patch to go with your daily pirate uniform.

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            This is part of the process, having community discussion based on fact, not all this fear mongering and parroting of lies.

          • Kevin Moore

            As usual, you skip questions in the discussion and claim everything else is a lie.

            Oh that information I posted above is from a Water Board meeting. I was there. Not something I heard on the internet. Your information, made up as you go.

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            Don’t forget that this is an El Nino year. Does more rain mean more development, is that the rule book you want to use?

            MMWD says they have enough water for the county’s projected growth. Don’t listen to Citizen Marin’s fluff about Mahatannizing Marin, that is just not going to happen. That is lies and fear mongering that needs to be left out of the discussion.

          • Kevin Moore

            The county said the plan needed to be updated and would be updated in 2015.

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            Yes, that is called planning in advance, a good way to plan. Don’t you agree that storage needs to be part of that discussion, or do you want to use the storage shortage to stop all building?

          • Kevin Moore

            Yes, it is called complete planning and as I recall you use to scoff at any deficit in the water system. Now you’re on board with evaluating and improving the water system as needed, if possible.

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            I still scoff at the false “water deficit” fable, it is a storage deficit. And I’m always onboard for maintaining our infrastructure and adopting new technologies as we go… we should make the water resource abusers pay dearly for their anti-societal behavior.

          • Kevin Moore

            It’s a water supply question. People care about water coming out of their tap. To increase the supply, there are several solutions.

            I can see the trap you’re trying to set. “It’s not about water.”
            In the end, it is all about water.

            Go back to the start of this thread. I was just talking about updating the water resource evaluation. You know planning. Maybe the plan is out of date for our water resource.

            You started mentioning shortage. I didn’t. I was wondering how many times you would repeat shortage and deficit. LOL. I’ve been amused.

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            I’m not setting a trap, I’m be a realist and looking at the facts.

            If your a fisherman and don’t catch any fish when there are millions in our oceans, the problem is not a fish shortage, the problem is a fisherman’s skill or equipment shortage… deal with the truth and your outcomes will improve.

            Tell Ross Valley about the water shortage the next time they flood. They’ll laugh you out of town.

          • Kevin Moore

            Go drink some of that flood water and see what happens.

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            Don’t be silly, it is only flood water if it isn’t captured. Do you understand that concept?

          • Kevin Moore

            In theory it will be an El Nino, a mild one.

            At the meeting, they said the housing added by the 2007 to 2014 needed to be assessed and evaluated. The study was completed in 2011 and RHNA for the area has been greatly increased. You boast there is no water problem. The Water Board did not sound so confident.

            Don’t over build the water resources is the goal. Same message I have been posting for over a year. There are various ways to fix it. Desalination is the last resort and we should avoid it at all costs.

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            And as we now know it is a storage problem, we’d be hard pressed to over build our natural water allotment.

          • Kevin Moore

            Nature has a water allotment?
            Wonderful pretzel logic.

          • Kevin Moore

            I’ve had enough of your silly mockery.

            Your political support is being voted out of office.
            Your support online, never much to begin with.
            You’re a waste of time wrapped in a yellow bandanna.

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            Hitler was also elected.

            It is about bringing facts to the table.

            Thou shall not attack the person’s character, but the argument.

            Thanks for the conversation.

          • Kevin Moore

            Usually, when someone brings up Hitler, their exhausted for crap to toss out. Time for you to retire.

            Maybe next time you can start the conversation in a civil manner.

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            You brought up electoral politics, I just reminded you of where that can take us if we aren’t careful.

            Thank GOD, we have laws and courts that (sometimes) protects the minority from the tyranny of the majority.

            Don’t you agree?

          • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

            Thou shall not claim that because a premise is popular, therefore it must be true.

          • Kevin Moore

            Good concept for you to cling onto. Very very few people like what you have to say. Keep pretending people think your comments are anything useful.

    • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

      Ad Hominem attack… And what is all this Fox News framing exercise about… Manhattanize, strip-mined, high density drive-by developers. All loaded statements and false… hummm do you have a good argument hiding somewhere?

      Thou shall not misrepresent or exaggerate a person’s argument in order to make them easier to attack.

      Thou shall not claim that because a premise is popular, therefore it must be true.

    • David Kunhardt

      Luke,
      I do not own any property in Marin, other than our home in Corte Madera.
      I do not advocate “high-density urbanization” in Marin. I have advocated for successful affordable housing developments, serving those who work here. As for WinCup, 10% (18 units) are below-market rate, though two of those not by much. I advocated that it be 20%, but was shut out by the developer and our own Town Council.
      When we have time, I will describe in detail for you how and why Bob S. is over 20 years out of date on his assessments of affordable housing.
      And please, no one would buy a poster with me on it, and I’m no child. I’m certainly not anyone’s ‘poster-child’.

      • Jimmy Fishbob Geraghty

        Much of Luke’s rhetoric is not based in realty, he makes up most of his stories to sound good.

        This applies to most of his arguments: Thou shall not misrepresent or exaggerate a person’s argument in order to make them easier to attack.

      • Luke Teyssier

        David – You told me on Sunday, May 10th, 2014 at the housing element workshop that you own 3 properties in Marin. Was that statement not accurate?

        You also chose to play a prominent role in the county’s video advocating for their plan, the version they presented at the housing element workshop, Sunday, April 26, 2014.

        “only 8 are designated for income lower than the average income of San Rafael.” We can do better than an entire WinCup for 8 units.

        > I will describe in detail for you how and why Bob S. is over 20 years out of date on his assessments of affordable housing.

        Please do write it up and post it in a location that the whole community can examine it, item by item, and evaluate each of your arguments on the merits. One would expect that, as the director of the MWHT, you already have this written up in detail.

        • David Kunhardt

          Luke, You are mistaking me for someone else. On Saturday, May 10th, I was with my family. I hear you were at the Strawberry Housing Element workshop that day, but I was not. Yes, I was invited to present some thoughts in the background video, primarily from the perspective of EMPLOYER, why a balance of housing types is necessary. Shame on the County for wanting to hear from a teacher, a firefighter, and an employer about their respective housing concerns. Who in the world does the County planning staff think they represent?

  • Robert Thomas

    I missed the first few minutes of the discussion, marveling at how Marin County could possibly ever be thought of as an urban landscape rather than a suburban one.

    This is impossible to understand. The deity placed a formidable natural barrier between the San Francisco peninsula and the Marin headlands for a more profound reason than to just keep cows out of the Presidio.

    The prospect of being asked to think of Marin as an urbanized county is too rich. With the standard apologies to Mark and John Sebastian (and with NO rights reserved in any way),

    Hot town, summer in Novato
    Doin’ my part with a low emission auto
    Been down, but I don’t get blotto
    Stayin’ outta Rohnert Park, only play the lotto

    All around
    People lookin’ like like me
    Joggin’ down a bike path
    Sippin’ on a chai tea

    But at night it’s a different vibe
    Ya know I can’t describe
    Hold on, hold on I can order for you
    Despite the fog, it’s a decent venue

    And babe, meet our sommelier, Giotto
    Tiburon
    Nothin’ like the nights
    In the summer, in Novato
    In the summer, in Novato

    Big frown – building in Novato
    I’m too mad to keep the voce sotto
    Munch chaat – tasty insalato
    Crummy condos for the gatos in Novato

    Show up
    Fuming like a hot spring
    At the Civic Center
    Gonna tell ‘em what I think

    But at night it’s a different vibe
    Ya know I can’t describe
    Hold on, hold on I can order for you
    Despite the fog, it’s a decent venue

    And babe, meet our sommelier, Giotto
    Tiburon
    Nothin’ like the nights
    In the summer, in Novato
    In the summer, in Novato

    Hot town, summer in Novato
    Doin’ my part with a low emission auto
    Been down, but I don’t get blotto
    Stayin’ outta Rohnert Park, only play the lotto

    All around
    People lookin’ like like me
    Joggin’ down a bike path
    Sippin’ on a chai tea

    But at night it’s a different vibe
    Ya know I can’t describe
    Hold on, hold on I can order for you
    Despite the fog, it’s a decent venue

    And babe, meet our sommelier, Giotto
    Tiburon
    Nothin’ like the nights
    In the summer, in Novato
    In the summer, in Novato

  • Dave Coury

    I am sorry that I couldn’t make it to the broadcast as I was having a pleasurable weekend in the Sierra. I totally support what David Kuhnardt had to say. I would also point out that the density issue is a red-herring. Feasibility of actually building affordable housing is the key issue and the jurisdictions in Marin cannot demonstrate that creating a diverse housing stock in Marin is feasible and therefore “punt” to zoning for 25 units. To lower that bar anymore would be a slap in the face to those who want a more diverse, sustainable, and livable Marin.
    The urban land price gradient for the Bay Area makes Marin much more like San Mateo, Alameda, and Contra Costa Counties than Sonoma or Napa. In fact, the needed adjustment is to make Sonoma County urban in view of the recent spike in land prices there.

    http://www.people-press.org/2014/06/12/political-polarization-in-the-american-public/

  • Solange Echeverria

    Marin doesn’t need a bill to ease the pressure to build more affordable housing for everyone-as it hasn’t capitulated to existing efforts, thanks to well heeled opponents of affordable housing, However, for those of you that want to turn Marin into acres of organic pastureland, or open public space, just where are the ranch hands, farm workers, bus drivers, state park rangers, teachers, police and fire fighters supposed to live? Environmentalists-ever go to a nice restaurant while you are enjoying the view? Are the waiters, hosts, etc supposed to live else where, clog up our freeways just to get to work? There is a happy medium, where those of us that WORK IN MARIN might actually be able to LIVE HERE. No one is asking for a handout, but Marin county has to be the only place in the country where making $70,000 per year is barely enough to pay for a rental in Marin, never mind home ownership. Does any one that opposes affordable housing give a damn about where their gardener/ maid/ teacher of their child lives? I think not.

  • wandagb

    It would be well to keep in mind there is no shortage of ‘affordable housing’ in Marin requiring rejiggering the density requirement, rather there is is a longage of people. It is an inconvenient truth, but worth reflecting upon as any ‘solution’ to today’s problem will only postpone a future problem as the state and county swell from more population growth.

    http://www.capsweb.org/sites/default/files/direct_and_indirect_contribution_of_immigration_to_cal_growth_2000-2010_0.pdf

    http://articles.latimes.com/2011/nov/27/local/la-me-california-move-20111127

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor