(Courtesy of George Lawson Gallery)

Artist Judith Belzer has spent the better part of the past two decades tracing the interplay between organic and manufactured landscapes. In her latest series of paintings, “Paths of Desire,” she looks down upon the convergence of nature and industry from the perspective of a crop duster, creating a semiabstract portrait of the Bay Area from a bird’s-eye view. Belzer joins us to discuss her latest series of oil-paintings, and the ways in which the man-made and the organic fold into one another in our day-to-day lives.

Guests:
Judith Belzer, artist whose recent exhibit is "Paths of Desire: New Paintings"

  • Angela

    Really interesting comments by your guest. I can definitely relate to her feeling of being dwarved by Californian nature. I grew up in the Bay Area, but moved to the UK for a decade. While there, I missed the grandeur of our Western landscape. But then returning, after living amid the relatively gentle countryside of southern England, I was surprised to observe that I , too, felt dwarved in Californian nature. It felt wilder, pricklier, and even a bit frightening. It’s alluring in its scale, and of course — BEAUTIFUL. I was just surprised to see how a local girl’s heart could be set racing returning to the redwoods, golden hills, and seascapes of Northern California. A ripe place for an artist, I’m sure!!

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