(Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

East Bay Congressman George Miller announced last week that he will retire at the end of this year, after 40 years in the House of Representatives. First elected in 1974 when he was 29 years old, the Martinez Democrat soon became a leader on education, health care and environmental issues. He joins us to reflect on his decades on Capitol Hill.

Guests:
George Miller, East Bay congressman representing California's 11th District and senior Democrat on the House Education and Workforce Committee

  • victoria s.

    Sorry to see him go! How will Congressman Miller spend his time after he retires? Any mentoring involved?

  • Bill Adams

    Thank you for your wonderful long and distinguished performance as our legislative representative at the state and national level. When I was in college my political science professor said that our Democracy would perform best under a two party system. I believed then and now that we could do well as a multiparty system which is more reflective of the actual opinions of the nation. What do you think about this? Also, I think you would make a great poli-sci. professor. Will you retire or work on a book about your career (sociopolitical) involvements/accomplishments?

  • Casey7931

    Thanks to Congressman Miller for all he’s done in the time he’s been in Washington, in particular for his work on the Lilly Ledbetter act. My biggest concern now is climate change, and I wonder what Mr. Miller thinks about the idea that gets talked about so much these days to put a price on carbon emissions by charging a fee on oil, gar, and coal production and rebate the proceeds back to households? It seems like a great way to use the market to reduce CO2 in the atmosphere.

  • Chemist150

    I think it’s wrong to take an opportunity to bash the Tea Party over the talks with Iran. Mostly I’m afraid that people associate Libertarians with the Tea Party which may be considered extreme.

    I’m not a tea partier but I am Libertarian and I’d like to point out that it was Ron Paul (Libertarian) who during the Presidential debates seemed to remember history the best and encouraged discussions with Iran.

    • Skip Conrad

      I think some bash the Tea party because it represents no special interest, but rather grassroots Americans. Correct me if I’m wrong.

      • Chemist150

        Interesting point.

        However, wasn’t there an association between the Tea Party and the Koch brothers? I don’t know how that would work, though, since there is no centralized Tea Party. Then again, it may make it easier.

        • Skip Conrad

          The Koch bros. contributed to the T-party. They did not start the TP, nor found the TP. It is decentralized and grassroots. There are no foreign interests in the TP, nor corporate interests. That is exactly why it is despised by some.

          • Menelvagor

            you have no idea what u are talking about. none. your absurdities are harmful to society. please stop lying and spreading harmful propaganda BS. Its just ridiculous. Please educate yourself.

          • Skip Conrad

            All that I write is the truth.

          • Menelvagor

            in your delusion. no need to make your hallucinations my hallucinations. ok skippy

        • Menelvagor

          they are completely centralized.

          • Menelvagor

            the tea party is centrally funded by the most fascist billionaires in america–instant money! However, there are “grassroots” foolish people–the undernourished malfunctioning brains/people, brainwashed and deluded, jumping on their bandwagon. Germany and Italy did the same thing once.

      • Menelvagor

        i think that is an absurd lie. the tea people are bought n paid for tooges by the richest billionaires in america–people by the way with fascist ideologies, bigoted ideologies, ad anti-american ideologies fighting a class war to destroy the middle class and create a third world wage-slave economy. “grassroots”–what a joke. just a dumb thing to say, and fraudulent and harmful. criminal really.

  • Skip Conrad

    Now that you no longer have any “dog in this fight”, what would you
    say is the ultimate solution to the water crisis in California?

  • Sarah

    I was a congressional page in 1989-1990 for Congressman Robert matsui. rep miller also had an appointed page that term. What does Rep.miller think of the end of the page program?

  • Kurt thialfad

    In this area of voter ID and voting rights, etc, what is the extent of voter fraud in the US? We all know there is voter and election fraud in the US. Historically, the US has been the home of election fraud – it was invented here, and there is a wealth of documentation about it.
    However, is there voter/election fraud in the US today? Any reasonable person would agree – of course there is voter/election fraud in the US today.
    Now, what is the extent of this fraud? One person per election or one million per election? The only way to find out is to study it. Draw up a commission. Collect the data. Establish some facts. Otherwise, Rep. Miller, can only say he doesn’t know what exactly he is talk about.
    (I might add that it is often said that there is “no evidence” of fraud. that doesn’t mean that no fraud happened. it only means that the fraud was undetected by anybody who cares)

    • Chemist150

      They do use the fact that there is “no evidence” as an excuse not to look so no evidence can be found to justify looking for it.

      I personally experienced election poll fraud when I live in San Francisco.

      I’m OK with voter ID laws as long as it gives reasonable time to get IDs.

      Using the argument that low income people can sign up for healthcare at the public libraries makes voter ID OK. The public library requires an ID and proof of residence by providing a bill or the like in your name at that address.

      I ask my neighbor who their voting for. They say they’re not voting. I now potentially have an extra vote.

      • Kurt thialfad

        On the other hand, you need show no ID when registering, and no ID when voting. It is an honor system. Don’t you think there is maybe one dishonest person out there? (Yes, at the very least.)

        • Menelvagor

          paid for by the millionaires running for office, often republicans. or how about republicans using the police to harass minoirities on the way to the polls.

          • Kurt thialfad

            who is paid for by millionaires?

          • Menelvagor

            If there are incidents of people voting more than once–such as in republican ohio–they are more than likely paid to do so by the same people who bring you the baggers. Thus any fraud that exists is Republican and Red county. Fraud in the electoral system is rampant behind the curtain among republican party fascists and neo-cons–BUSh was never elected, for example. But there is almost no voter fraud at the polls–it might as well be non-exsitant. Nothing to go changing laws over—if you are concerned about minorities–those colored folk—well, buddy–slavery was abolished and black folk are more Americana than you–blood been here longer and contributed more to Americana culture. Take away black culture and indigenous culture and its influences and america has almost no culture except commercial country western–yeah copenhagen, makes me feel so good! Dont hate man. just let people be. let them vote. it wont make a difference anyways. we dont have a real democracy. we have a plutocracy and no matter who you vote for, (if you can make it the polls wherever they have them hidden during work hours)–you voted for who they gave you. You didnt make any choices or changes. its a lie!

        • Menelvagor

          I always have to show my id when i vote–what are you talking about?

          • Kurt thialfad

            I’m not talking American Idol here, Frankie. Pay attention next time you cast your ballot in November on election day. Think about me, and remember this conversation. You will not have to show any id, and that’s the truth. Oh, btw, what state do you live in?

  • Robbie Raker

    Just wondering, why not tax USERS (individuals) of carbon, instead of oil and gad companies? It seems to me that it’s easy for one to vilify oil and gas companies and yet hop on a plane to travel, enjoy relatively low gasoline and natural gas prices, etc. shouldn’t we be responsible for our own carbon footprints?

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