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As 2013 comes to a close, we’ll take a look back at the year of work. We’d like to hear from our listeners about how your work-life has changed over the year. Are you a teacher adapting to new education standards? Are you working more flexible hours, or from home more often? Have there been any major shifts in the way your industry does things? Or are you spending less time working altogether because you can’t find enough work? We take up the changing workplace of 2013.

Guests:
Marty Nemko, career and education counselor and weekly contributor to USNews.com and to AOL.com

  • lombadesign

    After self employment in a near dead field I have been retraining and took a retail job I worked at in my 20’s. Before I made anywhere from $65-125 an hour, and am now making $13/hr part time and had to move back with my parents. The silver lining is growing closer to my dad and being there while he went through a knee replacement.

    • Fay Nissenbaum

      I worked in Macy for two years in the 1980s, I loved it because the sales were not hard core yet I sold well. The union wage rate in SF was $9/hour plus commission and time-and-a-half on Sundays, with full medical/dental insurance. Fast forward to today and they have removed the commission and time-and-a-half pay, while rents have more than tripled in SF. So the middle class is making less relative to their expenses which went way up.

      • lombadesign

        Been there. Done that before the career. It wasn’t a union job in the North Bay. One of the worst jobs I ever had, Macy’s. I really needed to remember the bad past, too. Thx.

  • Fay Nissenbaum

    Ask Marty about cover letters please. I fear mine are too long at one full page arguing why they should interview. Is it better to use two short paragraphs describing how you are a great fit for the job being applied for?

  • Mollie

    I work for a nonprofit which suffered from cutbacks and layoffs due to insufficient funding. I’m lucky to have stayed on, but my full-time position was reduced to 50%. However, I see it as a blessing in disguise because my small business, a cottage food operation, really took off in the latter part of the year. Now I’m hoping to expand my business in 2014 and make that my full-time job. I just have to thank the California legislature for enacting AB 1616, the Homemade Food Act, this year!

  • Fay Nissenbaum

    Please knock off the frou-frou bay area talk about work-life balance. How do people GET jobs today? How to improve cover letters & interview skills are needed please.

  • Chumbo Flummix

    I have been un/underemployed for two years. I’m 45, have a master’s, and have applied for hundreds of jobs — maybe over 1000. About a year ago, I started applying for entry-level jobs, still with no success. Having had many short-term jobs in different fields, my resume it a little wacky, but not bad. I have many skills, and could do almost anything with a little training, yet, I can’t even get unpaid internships. I scrape by with odd, underpaid jobs from taskrabbit, sidecar, etc. I have come to believe that if I was younger and didn’t have a master’s, I could get better employment. Hollowed out is right.

    • Chumbo Flummix

      p.s. If I didn’t have parents who care for me, I would have been homeless for about a year now.

  • Fay Nissenbaum

    Does LinkedIn really do anything?

  • $18238972

    Sorry we didn’t get to your important questions, Fay. I have written extensively on all your questions at http://www.martynemko.com

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