(Saul Loeb/Getty Images)

President Obama is making a push to get immigration reform passed by the end of the year. The Senate passed a bill in June to beef up border security and provide a path to citizenship for 11 million undocumented immigrants, but the measure hasn’t been brought to a vote in the House. Meanwhile some House Republicans are offering their own, more narrow immigration bills. We discuss the politics of immigration and the chances that a reform bill will get passed.

Guests:
Brian Bennett, national security correspondent for the Los Angeles Times
Ken Rudin, former political editor at NPR

  • Steve

    I can’t believe that our system allows one man – in this case Speaker Boehner – to control what comes up for a vote before the House. And that in spite of a majority in favor of legislation – Speaker Boehner continues to put party before country and insist that a majority of his caucus must support something before allowing it to come to a vote.

    • Skip Conrad

      He is invoking the “Hastert Rule”. Yes, perfectly legal. Yes, our system allows one man (and when Pelosi was Speaker, one woman) to stand up for what is right. Obama says it all the time, that he’s doing something strange and seemingly illegal (i.e. DACA) because he says it’s the “right thing to do”. Why is anybody so surprised, when Boehner does the same thing? After all, he is 3rd in the line of succession. So what you have is the 3rd most powerful man in the nation, counteracting the 1st most powerful man in the nation. Obama is stepping out of his realm of authority. Somebody needs to point out that emperor is wearing no clothes, instead of cowtowing to the dreary party line.

  • Bob Fry

    You know, if you could get The Political Junky on every week, that would be great.

    • Fay Nissenbaum

      Agreed – the replacement show for the cancelled ‘Talk of the Nation’ is abysmal. The Political Junkie was one of the best things on all of NPR radio.

  • Fay Nissenbaum

    Why has no legislator called upon the independent legislative and budget analyst to audit the cost of mass legalization? There are costs to our social services that are already underfunded. This will impact poor people and those at the margins. And yet, no one discusses — let alone researches and analyzes– what the plans will cost us.

    • Skip Conrad

      Have you heard of the Jordan Commision on Population and Immigration (chaired by democrat Barbara Jordan) held in the 1990’s under the democratic Clinton administration? Their recommendation was that he US needs to lower her immigration rates. Have these findings been suppressed, or simply ignored?

  • Skip Conrad

    I guess I don’t get it. The big talk is about jobs, and getting unemployed Americans back to work. But if you import ever increasing numbers of foreign workers, you are shooting yourself in the foot. The employment improvements are not going to happen. Right thing or not.

  • Bob Fry

    While I understand the Dems’ desire to eventually have millions of new citizens inclined to vote for them, it seems to me a reasonable compromise is to grant only permanent residency to those undocumented people who came as adults, and eventual citizenship to those who were brought over as children.

    • Kurt thialfad

      And why not, as a compromise, grant permanent residency to an equivalent number of Americans into that country from which came those aliens who are members of the class awarded permanent residency?

  • Fay Nissenbaum

    I see Scott only reads the politically correct comments on air. It’s only journalism.

  • Fay Nissenbaum

    Is Ken Rudin’s “The Political Junkie” segment still produced and heard on air? Come on, Scott – don’t tease us!

    • Bob Fry

      If KQED would bring back Ken Rudin for an hour on Wednesday, and use the other hour for other national issues, that one day would soon be widely listened to across the nation. A win for everybody.

  • Kurt thialfad

    “The Senate passed a bill in June to beef up border security and provide a path to citizenship for 11 million undocumented immigrants, but the measure hasn’t been brought to a vote in the House”.

    The Senate bill SB744 contains no guarantee of better border security, and immigration enforcement. However, it will guarantee that on day one, there will be one massive amnesty, with little hope to deport anybody, however nasty, who has applied to the program.

    Why doesn’t the Congress guarantee the border security, and immigration enforcement aspects?

  • Ohh Snap

    CNN has a story on a pompano beach man who was deported or detained while the kids were at school . The kids are referred to as legal residents due to them being born on U . S . soil , but here’s my question – the social security card and birth certificates that we are registered by all have to be signed notarized and signed by the parent – the hospitals and state and government agencies issuing proper documentation for infants are first assuming that the parents documents are legitimate , correct ? How is anyone who is not legal U.S. Residents signing anything even a birth certificated recognizable in an U. S. Court ?

    • Skip Conrad

      Exactly! That’s because these people are not under the jurisdiction of the United States. They have no legal basis for their presence. Their lives are built on a house of fraud.

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