(Brian Bahr/Getty Images)

Last month, the NFL and retired players and their families agreed to a $765 million settlement over concussion-related lawsuits. The suit has focused public attention on head injuries in all levels of football, and many other sports. We’ll discuss the prevention and treatment of sports-related concussions.

Guests:
Eric Freitag, co-founder of the California Concussion Coalition, board-certified neuropsychologist and executive director of the Mt. Diablo Memory Center Sport Concussion Program
Carlin Senter, primary care sports medicine specialist at UCSF, Concussion and Brain Injury Program
Pratik Mukherjee, associate professor of radiology at UCSF
Nate Jackson, former tight end with the Denver Broncos; author of "Slow Getting Up: A Story of NFL Survival From the Bottom of the Pile"
Alison Tetrick, professional cyclist based in Mill Valley who suffered three race-related concussions in a span of just 18 months

  • I’ll be Frank

    Maybe this pope fellow is suffering from some kind of sports-related concussion.

    First he tells people not to quibble over gay marriage, women’s right etc.

    Then it turns out he *excommunicated* a priest for advocating for precisely those things:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/24/pope-francis-excommunicates-priest-greg-reynolds_n_3983059.html

    A concussion is an odd injury for a churchman, but word has it such fellows engage in vigorous exercise sometimes with choir boys… ahem like playing soccer I mean.

  • bernice

    I’m an middle age nurse who had a fall a week ago with serious black eye after impact to eyebrow. At the time I had no loss of consciousness or other concussion symptoms. For the last few days, though, I’ve had a significant headache not responding to tylenol. Is rest enough?

    • bernice

      Thanks for the show, my question was answered . Other actions I took included ice packs to forehead and stopping ibuprofen because it can increase bleeding to bruised site.

  • Caffeine

    Here’s an interesting discussion of concussions in hockey, apparently conducted by Krasny’s twin up in Canada:

  • Caffeine

    What are the effects on astronauts’ brains when they leave and enter the atmosphere? It seems to be like a 5 minute long concussive event each way.

  • 1PeterDuMont2STARALLIANCE8

    Adults should teach young children about the natural function of the knees to absorb shock from jumping, and warn them NEVER to jump off anything without bending their knees! One can try enough of this effect by raising the heels just half an inch or so off the floor while standing, and let the body weight drop just that little bit without bending the knees.

    As a seven or eight-year-old kid, a naive little “scientist,” I decided to conduct an experiment by jumping off a two-foot planter box onto cement without bending my knees!

    I found out alright. It’s like a major sledge-hammer blow to the head. The full weight of the body gains momentum on the way down and comes to an instant stop, while all the force goes right up the leg bones and spine to the head.

    I felt like I’d been hit really hard and electrocuted at the same time, with strong effects lasting for many minutes. Yet since I didn’t quite pass out, and more-or-less recovered in half an hour or so, as I recall, it never occurred to me to report this important incident to my parents.

    Again, kids should be warned not to try this!

  • PBS, (many stations) will also be airing another documentary this fall that provide proven solutions to reducing the risk of concussions at the High School Football level: THE SMARTEST TEAM: Making High School Football Safer. Watch how one high school football team from Oklahoma reduced the rate of concussions by 75% last season.

    • Bill Tutuki

      Umm its not a surprise that ESPN was pressured by the NFL to pull out of the PBS Frontline Episode about NFL Concussions. Lets Hope the NFL does not pressure PBS affiliates including KQED to ban this movie you mentioned.

Sponsored by

Become a KQED sponsor